Recent Updates Page 2 Toggle Comment Threads | Keyboard Shortcuts

  • James 08:42 on May 5, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , ASPD, , , , , DSM, , , , ICD, intelligence, just testing to see if you're reading these, myths and legends, personality disorders, prison, , , , reality check, , workplace   

    Mythbusting psychopathy (part 1) 

    There are far too many common myths about psychopaths out there that I am sick of reading about. Here is a list of the most irritating, along with a hearty dose of reality. Note the links, which are my citations.

    Which one surprises you the most? Let me know in the comments. 

     

    MYTH: Psychopaths don’t know they’re psychopaths.

    Oh really? While some psychopaths (particularly very young or uneducated ones) may not know the specific term “psychopath”, or that it applies to them, all psychopaths of at least young adulthood are fully cognisant of their difference from others. What’s more, in this age of near-universal internet access, I’d be very surprised to come across an adult psychopath without some understanding of their psychopathy, though I expect back in the pre-web days many lived their whole lives without ever finding out why they were different. Most couldn’t be happier to be what they are; that is to say, most are fucking arrogant pricks.

     

    MYTH: Psychopaths are ‘worse’ than sociopaths; psychopaths are born, sociopaths are made; psychopaths and sociopaths are different things.

    Actually, neither psychopath nor sociopath are medical terms. The official term covering both in the latest versions of the Diagnostic Statistical Manual (DSM – 5) and the International Classification of Diseases (ICD – 10) is antisocial personality disorder (ASPD).

    The terms “psychopath” and “sociopath” have been used for the various theoretical explanations for the condition, with specialists using “psychopath” preferring a biological or neurological explanation (e.g. a psychopathic gene, brain damage) and researchers using “sociopath” more interested in social causes (e.g. childhood abuse, poor parenting). Modern consensus among psychologists and neuroscientists points toward a combination of the two, and most researchers in the field prefer the use of “psychopath” over the now rather dated and pop-sciencey “sociopath”. Osteopaths and homeopaths are something else entirely…

    Yes, Bob Hare’s famous PCL-R Checklist is a slightly different beast, but since it is only administered to dickheads locked up in prison, I would argue it focuses too strongly on criminality (and how an individual should be treated by the justice system) for it to be considered a legitimate diagnosis. I will concede that Hare himself does not like psychopathy being lumped in with ASPD. However, the British National Health Service and the American MedlinePlus medical encyclopedia both consider psychopathy to be a severe form of ASPD. Wait, this is stupid.

    So in actual fact, it seems nobody can agree on what, if anything, is the difference between these three terms: psychopathy, sociopathy and ASPD. Abandon hope and run to the hills.

     

    MYTH: Psychopaths have no empathy.

    Psychopaths have little or no warm empathy; that is to say they do not typically share the emotions of others or care about how other people feel. They are unsympathetic and lacking in compassion toward others. Psychopaths are quite capable of cold empathy, however; that is to say understanding how other people think and feel. They deliberately mimic facial expressions and behaviour that they see in others. Autistic people (in the broadest sense of what is a very broad spectrum) are kind of the opposite of this: they care about others’ feelings and share emotions, but are usually very bad at working out what other people are thinking or reading facial expressions.

    Recent research has also suggested psychopaths are capable of warm empathy when they actively try to empathise with other people, and that they can activate it like a switch when asked to do so.

     

    MYTH: All evil in the world is psychopaths’ fault.

    This barely warrants an answer. Every human being is capable of evil, but non-psychopaths mostly use their morality, their political ideals or shudder their religion as justification for their wrongdoing. The infamous Milgram experiments on obedience demonstrated that average Joe is more than happy to electrocute someone to death when told to do so by an authority figure.

    Yes, psychopaths do bad things if they feel like it. I’d say that’s a hell of a lot more honest than, for instance those who claim to believe in equality but still want a strong border to keep out the people with dark skin, or those oh-so-pious liberal saints who ignore Hobo Bill every day to get their morning Starbucks, or the followers of the Religion of Peace™ who blow themselves to kingdom come for a sniff of virgin. Ask most psychopaths, they will say the same. We are sick of taking the blame for everything, and laugh at the hypocrisy of those who assign said blame.

     

    Pic #2 - This is what happens when a psychopath gets access to coloring pages

    MYTH: Psychopaths actively wish harm on others. They hate everyone else. 

    You’re thinking of sadists and misanthropes. There is certainly a lot of overlap between sadism and psychopathy, but the true psychopathic attitude toward others is indifference. Everything I do is to benefit me; you do not come into the equation. If in the process of taking care of number 1, I make you laugh, cry, smile or squeal, well that was just incidental. You’re welcome / sorry / I don’t care.

     

     

    MYTH: Psychopaths are all active criminals or behind bars.

    It is true that as much as 25% of the American prison population may be psychopathic, and that some of the worst serial killers and mass murderers in history were psychopaths. What’s more, probably every psychopath out there has committed a crime at one point or other in their life (who hasn’t?) and clever ones are likely to get away with them for longer. Taking my whole life into account, I am guilty of physical assault, fraud, theft and petty vandalism (oh and probably “psychological abuse”, which my country in its infinite wisdom has recently made a crime. Talk about discriminating against my lifestyle!) These are not regular occurrences in my life though, and I am not known to the police.

    It is simply not the case that every psychopath is a hardened career criminal. Many, indeed probably most, psychopaths have never killed or seriously hurt another person. These ‘socialised’ psychopaths live normal lives, going to work, walking the dog, paying taxes, washing up, beating up prostitutes in back alleys… Psychopaths are found in all walks of life, more often than not with good, stable jobs and at a high or upwardly-mobile point on the social hierarchy. Which means that yes, some are drug lords, mafia bosses and terrorist leaders. But most are… well, see below.

     

    Image result for i'll kill you i'll kill all of you especially those of you in the jury

    MYTH: Psychopaths are a horrible scourge and a drain on our society.

    Just look at the list of the top 10 jobs with the most psychopaths:

    1. Corporate executive
    2. Lawyer
    3. Broadcast media
    4. Salesperson
    5. Surgeon
    6. Print or web journalist
    7. Police officer
    8. Member of the clergy
    9. Chef
    10. Civil servant

    So your society would likely collapse without psychopaths running your shit for you.

     

    MYTH: Psychopaths are more intelligent than non-psychopaths

    Psychopathy does not affect intelligence. There are some psychopathic geniuses, and many who are borderline retarded. Most lie somewhere in between, just like the general population. I would describe myself as well above average intelligence, but not (yet!) at the level of a genius. Bearing in mind my own “inflated self-worth” and “arrogance”, you may wish to adjust that estimate slightly lower.

    Keep your eyes peeled for part 2 next week. Stay in touch.

     
    • nowve666 10:10 on May 5, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      I’ve got a new one, kinda related to “All the Evil in the World” being our fault. Psychopaths are regularly blamed for the economic meltdown. I think the right-wing had something to do with it. And, as you pointed out, NTs are capable of evil. I’m frankly shocked that emotional “abuse” can be prosecuted as a crime. These things are so subjective. How does a prosecutor prove someone isolated his/her partner? Maybe they just found the other person’s friends more interesting or something. I guess you have “criminal versatility” but no drugs? Never? Do you think, as does PsychoMom, a brain scan can reveal a psychopath?

      Like

      • James 14:08 on May 5, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        I don’t know how psychological abuse can be proven. There’s no physical evidence like with wife beating or sexual assault, but maybe the police have phone-tapping powers or something typically underhand to gather evidence.

        Brain scans can definitely reveal psychopaths; have you heard of James Fallon?

        If you’re asking if I’ve taken drugs, I have, but I don’t really like things which take me out of myself. LSD doesn’t appeal, nor do any hallucinogenics really. I rarely drink enough to get drunk, but I like many kinds of alcoholic drink. I have found both weed and tobacco to be good about half the time, but otherwise disappointing, so both seem like a waste of money. Coke is the best I’ve tried, but I can’t afford to make a habit of it, and it is quite moreish.

        Like

  • James 18:30 on April 29, 2017 Permalink | Reply  

    I just discovered I have the power to delete YouTube comments on threads I’ve started.

     
    • nowve666 18:34 on April 29, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      I’ll have to check that out. I find the stupidest comments seem to be made on YouTube so I usually don’t even bother following up on threads once I’ve said my bit. But if I can delete the stupidest, most offensive, why not?

      Like

      • James 18:59 on April 29, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        Or just lord it over those with the temerity to disagree with me.

        Like

    • 1jaded1 22:40 on April 29, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      I know nothing about YouTube other than tap and watch. Would you rather delete the comment or leave it up to show that the poster was a posterior hole?

      Like

      • James 08:47 on April 30, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        It really depends on the comment. If I want to have an argument, I’ll reply. If not, I’ll delete.

        Like

  • James 18:00 on April 28, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , dreams, , fun, hallucination, , , questions,   

    Do psychopaths dream? 

    Scary Painting

    Sweet dreams

    It is a question that is often posed by the victims of psychopaths, by people who have known them, and just by the curious. In fact, when you type “do psychopaths” into Google, the search suggestions are as follows:

    1. do psychopaths cry?
    2. do psychopaths feel fear?
    3. do psychopaths yawn?
    4. do psychopaths love?
    5. do psychopaths dream?

    The first four are boring questions, and very easy to answer by anyone who ever gave them any thought:

    1. Rarely
    2. Yes, but hardly. Fearlessness is one of the main criteria in the PCL-R
    3. You might as well ask, “do psychopaths need to breathe?” Yes, we yawn when we’re tired, just like you!
    4. Nah

    But the fifth question is interesting. Its answer isn’t immediately obvious a priori and it tries to delve into the inner worlds of psychopaths in a clever way. What’s more, it’s one question to which, despite its popularity among inquisitive souls, is difficult to find a satisfactory answer, amid tedious conversations that go nowhere, and threads where everyone says equally plausible but mutually contradictory things.

    Well look no further, because I am a psychopath, and I can confirm that yes, I dream. I don’t dream very often (or at least I don’t often remember my dreams), in fact more often than not I have the stereotypical “death sleep” of a vampire, unburdened by thoughts and concerns from the day. I don’t have sleepless or disturbed nights because of stress, and I don’t lie awake mulling over ‘bad’ things I’ve done. But I do, on occasion, dream. My dreams tend to be fairly weird, though nothing so surreal as to inspire artwork.

    One recent dream I had, there was a bird trapped inside my room, beating its wings pointlessly against the closed window. As I walked over to open the window and free it, it seemed to panic and fly at me, so I hit it to stop it pecking me and it fell to the floor, dead. A couple of nights ago, I dreamt the house next door was on fire. The family that lives there has three children and two dogs, and they were also trapped upstairs (noticing a pattern yet?) I dialled for the emergency services, but when the fire brigade arrived, they had brought the police and accused me of setting the fire, which as far as I can recall, I hadn’t. In both dreams, I tried to do the decent thing, but the other ‘characters’ in the dream had other ideas and did their best to throw my help back in my face. I’m not really into dream interpretation, but if anyone wants to have a go at figuring these ones out, be my guest.

    Most commonly, I’m not even in my own dreams. Or rather, I’m like a static observer or an omniscient narrator, and the other people in the dream are acting out a story in front of me. Usually they’re not people that I know in real life, just ‘characters’ that inhabit the dream world. Sometimes I can go in and out of different people and take control of them for a while, make them do what I want to do, see the dream from their perspective, and then fly out and go back to watching again. These dreams tend to be violent, and seem to be set predominantly in horror movies or wars, but there’s not really any emotional content to them or consequences for being in them. Like I said, I’m more of a bystander watching things happen. Even when I ‘take over’ the characters, what happens to them doesn’t really end up affecting me. If the person I’m inhabiting gets hacked to death, then I just fly out of them and look down on their mutilated corpse with detached interest.

    Scary Painting

    are made of this

    Very occasionally I dream of people close to me dying. In real life, this sort of event doesn’t cause much emotion in me. If I liked the person, I am sorry they’re no longer around for me to enjoy them, but the idea of crying about it is utterly foreign. However, in these dreams, I’m very upset, grief-stricken even, in a way I have never been in my waking life. I seem to imagine myself as an ordinary, empathetic person, crying about the death of someone I love, just like I’ve seen other people be around death, and being really cut up about their loss. Unlike the previous two types of dream, these are closer to what I would think of as a nightmare, in that they’re actually unpleasant to experience. I don’t enjoy feeling those emotions, or at least dreaming that I am feeling them, and I especially don’t enjoy losing control of myself. Then, when I wake up, I’m back to normal. My pillow is sometimes wet; whether with tears or sweat, I don’t know. But I just think “huh, that was weird”, and go about my day.

     

    I have no idea if these dreams bear any resemblance to the sorts of dreams other people have. I’d be interested to hear from you.

    Art credit goes to the extremely creative, extremely talented and extremely dead Zdzisław Beksiński.

    I wonder if he’s living his dreams now?

     
    • nowve666 18:37 on April 28, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      When I was a child, I had repetitive dreams. I had dreams of exploring. I dreamed I was on a beach. My favorite dream was I am on a beach and a giant tidal wave comes over the entire beach. There is no way to avoid it. I am swept out to sea. But I can breath under water.

      We spent a summer on a farm and there was a cross rooster who scared all the kids. One night, I dreamed I loved the rooster. After that, I wasn’t afraid of him but that same day, they slaughtered him. I cried and cried and swore I would never stop crying. However, later, they served him for dinner and I ate him. He was delicious.

      One more childhood dream. I dreamed I turned into a monster. I got very tall, I was all the way up to the ceiling. I knew if my parents saw me, they would know I was a monster and destroy me so I knew I had to kill them. The dream didn’t go any further however.

      As an adult, Vicki and I like to watch our favorite movies on our DVD player. I often fall asleep. I watch the DVD from my bed. I enjoy the kind of twilight state of sleeping and intermittently waking to see the screen. I almost always think I’m seeing the window at first. Then I realize it’s the TV. The movie and the dream kind of merge.

      As far as emotions in dreams go, I experienced a lot of euphoria, especially when dreaming of the beach. When I was in the nut house, I had a scary dream about a nurse who worked there. In my dream, she was evil and powerful. After I woke up, I still felt creepy about her until I talked to my shrink and we worked out the dream was about feeling unable to communicate. After that, she didn’t bother me.

      Oh! And I had a dream after I saw The Exorcist. That is the only movie that ever scared me. In the dream, In saw Regan’s head twisting around like it did in the movie and she had a really evil look on her face. Then I realized I can witness evil without being consumed by it and my fear went away both in the dream and in real life related to the movie.

      Like

      • James 19:00 on April 28, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        You have a better memory for dreams than me. There’s no way I could remember such details from dreams years and years ago. Your subconscious is clearly more creative than mine. Interesting that you have had “scary dreams”. I don’t think I’ve ever been scared by a dream.

        Some pisshead just tried to scare me (in real life) by shouting “ALRIGHT, MATE!” at the top of his voice. He and his friend were drinking behind a tree in the shadows, so I hadn’t seen them, but I don’t jump or have any sort of fight / fight response, so I just called back “I’m great. How’s it going with you?” They were drunk enough to just laugh, so I left them to it.

        Like

    • 1jaded1 23:48 on April 28, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Hi James. This is most interesting. The responses to the first 4 questions made me laugh. The response to the 5th…idk and am not a psychologist…iatrist…analyst or anything. Sounds like a battle though. Wanting to help and being pecked…Feeling upset in a dream where you wouldn’t be upset if you were awake.

      Since you asked….and not that you may care other than amusement.

      My dreams consist of paranormal. Entities want to eat me. They would starve bc I lost my soul at a very early age. Some want to protect.

      This week has been a cluster fk of nightmares. Tuesday, I dreamt that a lady wanted to kill me bc it should have been me. When I was allowed to make sense , I should have had my face peeled off at the pinball machine. I elected to use the washroom. Total made up dream. I didn’t see anyone’s face peeled off. Maybe a narcissist mask. Maybe I am one.

      The side by sides last night revolved around calls to 911. The leaser of the traumatic had the operator wanting me to verify my date of birth and a newspaper article on the date of me calling… My co-worker passed our.. I asked wtf any purpose that had.

      The more disturbing one had my ex who has NPD beating my parents to a pulp. My sister and I called 911 for2 assaults, but they only sent one ambulance. My dad (who is already deceased) told me he was dying and to have the amby take my mom. Then he died in front of me. I woke up traumatised and called my mom. Lol. It is still sticking hence my response. Subconscious is my ex wants to get back into my life and take agression out on family? Who knows? So disturbing . i want nothing more to do with him.

      Thank you for your post. TMI in my response? Okay. Question was asked..

      Like

      • James 11:06 on April 29, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        Thank you for reading and for your comment. I wonder, do you feel at all better for having written all that? I got a certain cathartic pleasure from writing my dreams out, though yours seem to be more closely connected to the real world and your fears about things going wrong. Have you any reason to think your ex may be trying to get back into your life?

        Liked by 1 person

    • 1jaded1 20:28 on April 29, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      You are welcome. It sometimes helps to release the dreams through writing. My ex is trying to contact me and I am ignoring him.

      Like

c
Compose new post
j
Next post/Next comment
k
Previous post/Previous comment
r
Reply
e
Edit
o
Show/Hide comments
t
Go to top
l
Go to login
h
Show/Hide help
shift + esc
Cancel
%d bloggers like this: