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  • GeneticPsychosMom (Tina) 09:15 on March 19, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: abusers, , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,   

    The Cruel Reign of Donald the Wicked 

    King Donald the Wicked

    The theme that unites all of Trump’s initiatives so far is their unnecessary cruelty.

    1. His new budget comes down especially hard on the poor – imposing unprecedented cuts in low-income housing, job training, food assistance, legal services, help to distressed rural communities, nutrition for new mothers and their infants, funds to keep poor families warm, even “meals on wheels.”

    These cuts come at a time when more American families are in poverty than ever before, including 1 in 5 children.

    Why is Trump doing this? To pay for the biggest hike in military spending since the 1980s. Yet the U.S. already spends more on its military than the next 7 biggest military budgets put together.

    1. His plan to repeal and “replace” the Affordable Care Act will cause 14 million Americans to lose their health insurance next year, and 24 million by 2026.

    Why is Trump doing this? To bestow $600 billion in tax breaks over the decade to wealthy Americans. This windfall comes at a time when the rich have accumulated more wealth than at any time in the nation’s history.

    The plan reduces the federal budget deficit by only $337 billion over the next ten years – a small fraction of the national debt, in exchange for an enormous amount of human hardship.

    1. His ban on Syrian refugees and reduction by half in the total number of refugees admitted to the United States comes just when the world is experiencing the worst refugee crisis since World War II.

    Why is Trump doing this? The ban does little or nothing to protect Americans from terrorism. No terrorist act in the United States has been perpetrated by a Syrian or by anyone from the six nations whose citizens are now banned from traveling to the United States. You have higher odds of being struck by lightning than dying from an immigrant terrorist attack.

    1. His dragnet roundup of undocumented immigrants is helter-skelter – including people who have been productive members of our society for decades, and young people who have been here since they were toddlers.

    Why is Trump doing this? He has no compelling justification. Unemployment is down, crime is down, and we have fewer undocumented workers in the U.S. today than we did five years ago.

    Trump is embarking on an orgy of cruelty for absolutely no reason. This is morally repugnant. It violates every ideal this nation has ever cherished. We have a moral responsibility to stop it.

    Excerpt from: Robert Reich: 4 Reasons the Trump Administration Is Unspeakably Cruel, March 17, 2017

    Robert B. Reich has served in three national administrations, most recently as Secretary of Labor under President Bill Clinton. His latest book is “Saving Capitalism: For the Many, Not the Few.” His website is http://www.robertreich.org.

    Photo courtesy https://twitter.com/kingdonaldtrum1

     

    Psychopath TEST Politicians

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    • Amaterasu Solar 11:33 on March 20, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      I wish I could post a graphic here… I have one I have been tweeting out that says:

      Cut the military
      Feed the poor
      I do not
      Consent to war!

      Yes, Grump is another psychopath puppet for the psychopaths in control, and again, I suggest We withdraw Our consent from systems that promote psychopaths. My latest article:

      I AM anti-New World Order – A Better Way
      http://tapyoureit.boards.net/thread/99/anti-new-world-order

      Like

      • James 15:21 on March 20, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        You’re still an author here, so you should be able to put any image you like in a new post (as long as it’s of a certain common type supported by WordPress – .jpg, .png, .gif etc). I certainly can.

        Like

  • GeneticPsychosMom (Tina) 10:45 on October 3, 2016 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: abusers, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,   

    10 Ways Manipulators Use Emotional Intelligence for Evil 

    evil grin

    Emotional intelligence is nothing new.

    Sure, the term was coined in the 1960s, and popularized by psychologists in recent decades. But the concept of emotional intelligence–which I define as a person’s ability to recognize and understand emotions and use that information to guide decision making–has been around as long as we have.

    This skill we refer to as emotional intelligence (also known as EI or EQ) is like any other ability: You can cultivate it, work to enhance it, sharpen it.

    And it’s important to know that, just like other skills, emotional intelligence can be used both ethically and unethically.

    The dark side of emotional intelligence

    Organizational psychologist and best-selling author Adam Grant identified EI at its worst in his essay for The Atlantic, “The Dark Side of Emotional Intelligence“:

    Recognizing the power of emotions…one of the most influential leaders of the 20th century spent years studying the emotional effects of his body language. Practicing his hand gestures and analyzing images of his movements allowed him to become “an absolutely spellbinding public speaker,” says the historian Roger Moorhouse–“it was something he worked very hard on.”

    His name was Adolf Hitler.

    The last thing anyone wants is to be manipulated, whether it’s by politicians, colleagues, or even those who claim to be our friends.

    Below, I’ve listed 10 ways emotional intelligence can be used against you. Of course, these actions and characteristics don’t always identify a lack of ethics; a person may practice them unintentionally. Nonetheless, increasing awareness of these behaviors will equip you to deal with them strategically, and sharpen your own EQ in the process.

    1. They play on fear.

    A manipulator will exaggerate facts and overemphasize specific points in an effort to scare you into action.

    Strategy: Beware of statements that imply you lack courage or attempts to instill a fear of missing out. Make sure you have the whole picture of a situation before taking action.

    2. They deceive.

    All of us value transparency and honesty, but manipulators hide the truth or try to show you only one side of the story. For example, consider the manager or employee who purposefully spreads unconfirmed rumors and gossip to gain a strategic advantage.

    Strategy: Don’t believe everything you hear. Rather, base your decisions on reputable sources and ask questions when details aren’t clear.

    3. They take advantage when you’re happy.

    Often, we’re tempted to say yes to anything when we’re in an especially good mood, or jump on opportunities that look really good at the time (but that we haven’t really thought through). Manipulators know how to take advantage of those moods.

    Strategy: Work to increase awareness of your positive emotions just as much as your negative emotions. When it comes to making decisions, strive to achieve balance.

    4. They take advantage of reciprocity.

    Manipulators know it’s harder to say no if they do something for you–so they may attempt to flatter, butter you up, or say yes to small favors…and then ask you for big ones.

    Strategy: For sure, giving brings more joy than receiving.

    But it’s also important to know your limitations. And don’t be afraid to say no when appropriate.

    5. They push for home-court advantage.

    “A manipulative individual may insist on you meeting and interacting in a physical space where he or she can exercise more dominance and control,” says Preston Ni, author of How to Successfully Handle Manipulative People.

    These people may push to negotiate in a space where they feel ownership and familiarity, like their office, home, or any other place you might feel less comfortable.

    Strategy: If you need to negotiate, offer to do so in a neutral space. If you must meet the person on his or her home turf, ask for a drink of water and engage in small talk upon arrival, to help you get your bearings.

    6. They ask lots of questions.

    It’s easy to talk about ourselves. Manipulators know this, and they take advantage by asking probing questions with a hidden agenda–discovering hidden weaknesses or information they can use to their advantage.

    Strategy: Of course, you shouldn’t assume wrong motives in everyone who wants to get to know you better. But beware of those who only ask questions–while refusing to reveal the same information about themselves.

    7. They speak quickly.

    At times, manipulators will speak at a faster pace or use special vocabulary and jargon in an attempt to gain advantage.

    Strategy: Don’t be afraid to ask people to repeat their point, or to ask questions for clarity. You can also repeat their point in your words, or ask them to name an example–allowing you to regain control of the conversation.

    8. They display negative emotion.

    Some people purposefully raise their voice or use strong body language to show they’re upset, in an effort to manipulate your emotions. (Basketball coaches are masters at this.)

    Strategy: Practice the pause. If someone demonstrates strong emotion, take a moment before reacting. In some instances, you may even walk away for a few minutes.

    9. They give you an extremely limited time to act.

    An individual may try and force you to make a decision within a very unreasonable amount of time. In doing so, he or she wants to coerce you into a decision before you have time to weigh the consequences.

    Strategy: Don’t submit to unreasonable demands. If your partner refuses to give you more time, you’re better off looking for what you need somewhere else.

    10. They give you the silent treatment.

    “By deliberately not responding to your reasonable calls, text messages, emails, or other inquiries, the manipulator presumes power by making you wait, and intends to place doubt and uncertainty in your mind,” says Ni. “The silent treatment is a head game, where silence is used as a form of leverage.”

    Strategy: After you’ve attempted communication to a reasonable degree, give your partner a deadline. In situations where alternatives are unavailable, a frank discussion addressing his or her communication style may be necessary.

    Putting it into practice

    There will always be those who work to increase their emotional awareness–in both themselves and others. Sometimes, they’ll use that power for manipulative influence.

    And that’s exactly why you should sharpen your own emotional intelligence–to protect yourself when they do.

    (If you’d like more tips on how to make your emotions work for you, instead of against you, make sure to sign up for my free monthly newsletter.)

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  • GeneticPsychosMom (Tina) 09:24 on January 3, 2016 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: abusers, , , , , , , , , , , , , ,   

    How Can My Baby Boy Be a Psychopath? 

    Little girl with flame on middle finger

    He is 8 years old. I was in denial for a long time that he fit the description of a Sociopath. Even after the diagnosis, I struggled to find excuses which would invalidate this diagnosis. But I knew it was true, even if it took a long time to admit it to myself. A few months ago, I began to accept it. I started doing research, but most cases like his are deemed hopeless. I don’t think so.

    My son is very intelligent. He has been nominated by his teachers into ‘gifted’ programs. His mind is not that of an 8-year-old child. I began to recognize the signs in him when he was around 4 years old. He’s now 8, and things are deteriorating for us as he gets older and smarter.

    He taught himself how to write in cursive when he was 7. He has perfect cursive handwriting – much better than mine. And he has perfected my signature. He can forge anyone’s signature by simply watching them sign it one time. He has filled out credit card applications that came in junk mail. He can address a letter, put a stamp on it, and fill out all necessary information to obtain a credit card in my name. He has also used my credit card to order thousands of dollars worth of merchandise from Amazon including cell phones and tablets. Despite being banned from using the internet for this reason, he always finds a way. I change my passwords and pin numbers – but he somehow learns them again. He is seemingly unstoppable.

    He has no regard for the safety or feelings for others. He will do whatever it takes to get what he wants. I do not mean in the same way that a child will manipulate a parent in order to get a cookie before dinner. I mean in a way that he would destroy a person’s life for a cookie, and think nothing of it. That is NOT an exaggeration.

    I have tried to teach him what is right, what is wrong, and why it is so. I sit down with him, and I explain in depth all of the reasons for why it is not okay to steal my credit card and order merchandise from the internet. I spend hours upon hours with him, face to face, explaining how and why his actions are harmful, as well as the consequences of those actions. He can recite my words back to me and he can even explain it back to me in his own words. He understands what I am saying, but he will turn around and do the exact same thing 2 seconds later if he feels like it. If it means losing our house, if the consequences are that it would ruin our lives. If someone could die.. He truly does not care about those things whatsoever.

    I’ve exhausted myself trying to reason with him. I’ve tried everything to get him to care about what he’s doing. I used to think that he did care and that he was sorry, but just could not control himself. I wanted to believe that. He was very convincing when it seemed he was expressing remorse. But I learned that his words are just that. Words. There’s no intention of keeping any promises. There’s no actual guilt or remorse. He simply goes through the motions of apologizing – but he is not actually sorry. Sometimes I felt like I didn’t know him at all. I could not distinguish what was real, what was pretend, what was mimicking.

    He says things to purposely hurt me. He blames me no matter what I do, and no matter how hard I try to make him happy. When I try to stand up to him, he uses hurtful words and breaks my heart. When I try to stand up to his violence, he pushes even harder. He threatened me that if I reach out for help that he will lie and say that I do bad things that I don’t really do. He had me backed into a corner with no way out before I could even realize what was happening. I was left to decide: Do I ask for help and risk them believing him over me and lose everything including him? Or do I back down and continue to let him do these things? I was on the verge of suicide, and I reached out for help.

    Despite everything he’s done, I love him. These details are just the tip of an enormous iceberg. Life has been truly horrible for a long time. He’s in a hospital now and in an environment that is controlled so that he can be helped and I can safely do what I can to help him, too. He’s my child, and I want him to be with me. I just need to be able to get to him. I can’t accept that this is all he’s capable of and I can’t accept that there’s no hope for him.

     

    Excerpt from “How can I reach my child who’s a Sociopath?

    Image courtesy: Anake Goodall

    For more information about psychopathy:  TED-Ed Lesson “What is a psychopath?

    Search tem: Are there psychopathic children?

    Psychopath TEST Politicians

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    • insanitybytes22 09:49 on January 3, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      That’s a very sad and frustrating thing to read.

      Like

    • James 10:00 on January 3, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Really interesting article, this kid is a lot cleverer than I was. I wonder if being in a hospital will help him though. It may well change his behaviour to be more pro-social, but it will probably deepen the emotional rift between mother and son. He will see it as being abandoned rather than ‘helped’. She may get rid of the psychopathy (or at least the more overt symptoms) but also lose her son altogether in the process.

      Liked by 1 person

      • @GeneticPsycho (Tina) 21:19 on January 4, 2016 Permalink | Reply

        I don’t think it is yet possible to get rid of psychopathy. Maybe the overt misbehavior will be toned down so he is easier to live with – like you 🙂 I think you are right about the abandonment that the son will feel. One of my psychopath brothers accuses my mother of abandonment even though it is not her fault that she was stricken with severe illness. Nothing can convince him otherwise.

        Liked by 1 person

    • Allie 10:11 on January 3, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      This is heartbreaking to read. I’ve read the famous book “Without conscience and her story seems to fit. Prayers.

      Like

    • C-PTSD Awareness 06:06 on January 4, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Empathy. Mom’s who have kids with Childhood Conduct Disorder know.

      Like

    • lucy 15:01 on January 4, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Hi! I feel for you.
      Maybe first solution is by starting to seriously not being scared of him. Learn him what boundaries are, and not softly and apologizing, but clearly and efficiently. If you feel helpless, get help from an educator.
      This kid needs authorities and clear boundaries to hold his -apparently strong- anxiety. Hence for now you get anxious and he gets even more anxious too and so abuse you even more… and its a never ending toxic circle. Until you react.
      It’s tiring and he might be very manipulative, but you are powerful and, as his mother, much stronger than him; at least morally. Hope it will give you some hope. You are not a victim and he has no power (well, the only power you let him have). Take care!!

      Like

      • James 06:00 on January 5, 2016 Permalink | Reply

        Not only is what you say mostly incorrect, you are also not writing to the mother in question. This article is an excerpt from “https://www.quora.com/How-can-I-reach-a-child-whos-a-Sociopath”. Take it over there.

        Like

    • Gretchen 21:43 on January 4, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Children can not know that what they say hurts their parents. I have an overly empathetic child, so she becomes very upset if she thinks she has hurt me. For my friend… His son was diagnosed at ten. He is now a young adult. He wreaked havoc on their lives. False molestation charges. Almost caused his parents to divorce over it. Stolen money, small animals captured and dissected- it was horrifying. Upon speaking with my friend, he emphasized that if he could have done anything differently, it would be to assert his authority more. Pyschopathic children cannot be parented the same way. They are without a moral compass and work only with logic.
      I am glad that he is getting help. It must break your heart to have a child that you know is mentally incapable of loving you back. I cannot even fathom that pain.

      Liked by 1 person

      • James 06:40 on January 5, 2016 Permalink | Reply

        Correct me if I’m wrong, but I guess the ‘pain’ is akin to grief. Grief which may be misplaced, I might add. Your child can still make you proud, even if s/he is a psychopath, and you can still have a relationship with them.

        Like

        • @GeneticPsycho (Tina) 07:21 on January 5, 2016 Permalink | Reply

          The grief/pain is unavoidable. Even if a parent is proud and has a relationship with a psychopathic child, the pain from the palpable absence of love is ever present.

          Like

          • James 08:53 on January 5, 2016 Permalink | Reply

            Yeah, I understand that. I don’t think my parents experience “a palpable absence of love”, in fact I think they accept that I do love them. The most either have said on the matter is lamenting a lack of care shown toward them. But as far as I know, they don’t know anything about psychopathy.

            Actually, come to think of it, I have a bad memory from when I was very young (certainly a pre-schooler, and now so long ago that it may be a dream or a mis-remembered event) of my dad saying “I don’t think you love / like* me” and leaving me alone in my dark room (it was bedtime).

            *Can’t remember which he used.

            Like

          • James 08:55 on January 5, 2016 Permalink | Reply

            Is “enough love for the both of us” a myth then?

            Like

    • madken 03:59 on January 28, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Put a gun to his head and blow it wide open…. now seriously… I think you’re exaggerating.
      You are the psychopath!

      Like

      • Laura 23:36 on March 3, 2016 Permalink | Reply

        For you to think anyone is exaggerating without loving it makes you an ignorant, insensitive ass. As for the article, you are being codependent. If your son is truly without a conscience, he is not going to grow one because of your love. You are wasting your time with that, and he is exactly where he needs to be: where he can’t hurt others. I hope he stays there for good. All sociopaths needs to be separated from the population permanently.

        Like

    • Laura 23:43 on March 3, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      This child is where all sociopaths need to be: separated from the population. To “love” him like he is going to change because of that love is waste of energy.

      Like

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