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  • James 21:10 on January 12, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: aura, , crying, Discard - the final frontier, emotions, , , , , , No Psychos - now with more boobs, , , , , , , tears, , Wet pussy   

    No need to cry about it 

    What is your problem?

    I’ve always found it odd that very young children cry. I think “What have you got to cry about? You have no responsibilities. You can play all day. You’re intellectually a simpleton, so there’s little chance of getting bored and the littlest things can keep you entertained. You have no concept of morality, and the normals haven’t even infected you with the misery they live with yet, so you can quite literally do whatever you want. Compared to this, the rest of your life is going to be a disaster zone. Wait until high school! Wait until mortgages and bill repayments and supermarkets and annoying coworkers. Wait until you’re mopping up the sick and poo of your own child, and wondering why they’re always fucking crying. Wait until you’re old, and your body and mind both start decaying before you’ve finished using them, and you keep putting baking soda in your tea and your cat in the dishwasher. These, your carefree days of childhood, are the good times. It’s all down hill from here. And yet, there you are – bawling like a, well, like a baby.”

    Then someone was kind enough to point out: “they have no other way of communicating.” Of course! It’s obvious. Silly me. But that is true primarily of babies, and it does beg the question as to why psychopathic babies (God, is that even a thing? A little cherub from hell come to devour your life savings and personal freedom.) don’t cry. Psychopaths are good communicators, or at least they’re good at communicating their needs to others and getting those others to provide for them, so why don’t they cry? That’s not rhetorical. Hey, I don’t have all the answers!

    Still, once we get into late toddlerhood, most kids have been talking for a couple of years and are getting quite good at it, and especially at asking questions. And we’re still in “Everything in life is great” territory, so what’s with the crying? Note that we’re talking genuine tears here, not tantrums or other such manipulations. Why do they cry with emotion?

    Now, having met and spoken with at least one person claiming to be an “empath”, the answer to this puzzle might be teased. I am still skeptical as to the existence of empaths, i.e. people with an abnormally heightened empathy such that they can almost read minds (or certainly hearts, if hearts be the organ of emotion). To me, it all sounds a bit Star Trek, a bit Deanna Troi. But I’ve met and spoken with a self-proclaimed empath, and since I’m the one claiming to be something most people believe only exists in slasher films, who am I to judge?

    Worst counsellor ever.

    According to the empath, most people are noisy. She doesn’t mean that they’re loudmouths (although I would attest to that also being the case), but that they’re emotionally noisy. Apparently, most people give off a kind of aura of emotion and for this empath at least the aura manifests itself as noise. Maybe the ‘noise’ is just metaphorical and other empaths choose to use more visual or tactile descriptors of auras, or maybe it’s all bullshit. I don’t know, but what I do know is that I am apparently not noisy. I am very quiet. Being around me, says the empath, is calming. Being around me is like when she’s alone. She can just be who she is, and focus on her own mind and her own emotions, without a constant onslaught coming from other people.

    I have never denied that I have emotions; all humans are by their nature emotional beings. But I have noticed over the years that mine are more level and altogether less bumpy than others’. I don’t get wound up easily, I don’t jump with fright, I don’t go to pieces under stress – indeed if anything adverse circumstances excite me and get me fired up. Knowing this about myself, and have it be recognised by this empath unprompted, does give a clue as to why, even in infancy, a psychopath may be far less prone to crying than others. The frequent crying of even children old enough to speak may not be nearly as much of a puzzle to others as it is to me; and indeed, given the apparently different emotional worlds we inhabit, this, I suppose, is to be expected.

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    • nowve666 23:15 on January 12, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      ROTFLMAO!!! So you didn’t cry as a baby? Do you remember? Have you asked your mother what you were like then? One reason babies cry is physical discomfort. They get things like colic. They wake up hungry with wet diapers. They get diaper rash. And they might get lonely if they are left alone in their crib. They cry when they are startled with loud sounds. And I understand they need their mothers to “mirror” their facial expressions and get upset if their mothers don’t do it. Also, I understand most babies have empathy. So if another baby outs crying, the baby who hears it can start crying out of empathy. Obviously, we didn’t do that, I guess. Why do you call babies little psychopaths?

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      • James 05:42 on January 13, 2018 Permalink | Reply

        I don’t remember being a baby, but there are videos of me. I didn’t call babies little psychopaths; I was referring to babies who are psychopaths later in life, and was wondering if they already were psychopaths even as a baby.

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    • nowve666 09:01 on January 13, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Oh. OK. I read this very late at night. I don’t blame babies for crying a lot. After all, finding themselves thrust into this world. They don’t even known where their bodies end and the world begins. They can’t coordinate their arms and legs or even see in the beginning. They suddenly depend on an outside person, the mother, usually. She controls when they eat, when they are warm or cold, when their diapers change, etc. Then they begin crawling and then walking. Everything is really difficult. Fortunately, it’s not in the nature of a baby to be a quitter. They keep trying until they succeed. As for “the normals haven’t even infected you with the misery they live with yet,” I knew at an early age that adults were full of shit. I assumed most of what they told me was a lie. One of my earliest memories was distrusting what I was told. It’s not that they were necessarily lying. But they seemed to be deceiving themselves. I distrusted even things that later turned out to be true. For example, I was told New York, my hometown, was the biggest city in the world and the Empire State Building was the tallest building in the world. I immediately thought, “I’ll bet everyone says that about the city they live in.” I was also told over and over that childhood was the best time in my life, just like you are saying. I thought, “I don’t believe it.” Guess what. I grew up and discovered that childhood was not the best time in my life. I enjoyed adulthood much more. Sure, there are hassles. But there is also more freedom.

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    • Christopher Flore 15:30 on January 13, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Their parents’ struggle. I’ve always been interested about them crying, i figure sometimes they are born and don’t cry and other times they cry into the world, the other part is if the birth itself isn’t smooth but the two go hand in hand sometimes. There is a need to cry when there is sometimes btw and it takes the sadness out of you.

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      • James 10:55 on January 14, 2018 Permalink | Reply

        Good point. Thanks for your comment, Christopher.

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    • Critter 07:51 on February 14, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      “…And we’re still in “Everything in life is great” territory, so what’s with the crying? Note that we’re talking genuine tears here, not tantrums or other such manipulations. Why do they cry with emotion?…”

      Crying with emotion over seemingly trivial stuff just happens to be a useful way for a developing brain to find ways to make those emotional responses be useful by the time they reach adulthood. That behavior is just a sign of impulse control and emotional regulation developing in a young brain. Good thing that process starts early isn’t it?

      “According to the empath, most people are noisy. She doesn’t mean that they’re loudmouths (although I would attest to that also being the case), but that they’re emotionally noisy. Apparently, most people give off a kind of aura of emotion and for this empath at least the aura manifests itself as noise. Maybe the ‘noise’ is just metaphorical and other empaths choose to use more visual or tactile descriptors of auras, or maybe it’s all bullshit.”

      I honestly don’t belive in the whole empath consept. Although to her credit, people probably do have the neurological equivalent of both a signal amplifier and noise filter, both somewhat adjustable, otherwise it would be extremely hard for people to adapt to different social environments. If that happens to be the way the brain does works, then empaths probably has a noise filter dialed to minimum and an amplifier dialed to max. In that sense, I would have to compromise and agree to empaths being ~ 50% right, lol.

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      • James 09:59 on February 14, 2018 Permalink | Reply

        Hi, welcome back (assuming you’re ‘Typical Critter’ from before)

        The noise filter concept definitely seems intuitively like it must exist. If you had the same level of focus in a large crowd as you did in a small group of people or in a one-to-one exchange, the stimuli would likely be overwhelming. As it is, a lot of people find large crowds stressful, but it must help a lot not having to listen to everyone’s conversations or keep track of what everyone in the crowd looks like, smells like, what they’re doing, what they’re wearing, various non-verbal cues such as body-language, expression, gait etc.The fact that we mostly don’t do this would strike me as evidence of a filter in action. Indeed, people I know who are most on edge in crowds (generally there is a past trauma behind that) report that they’re unable to tune everyone out; if they’re in a restaurant, they have to keep an eye on all the customers, staff and anyone else who comes through the door.

        “That behavior is just a sign of impulse control and emotional regulation developing in a young brain. Good thing that process starts early isn’t it?” Is that rhetorical? I don’t see much or indeed any use for crying over spilt milk or dead puppies. The emotional responses are not useful, they’re wasteful. While weak neurotypicals waste time leaking salty water out of their faces and grimacing, psychopaths (and indeed pragmatic neurotypicals) are working out how to solve the problem they’re faced with. So I would have to say that no it is not a good thing children learn how to be emotional wrecks from a very young age.

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        • Critter 17:39 on February 15, 2018 Permalink | Reply

          I have one anecdote when it comes to people who claim to be empaths, they seem to have a tendency to overinterpret things when it comes to other peoples emotional responses.

          “…While weak neurotypicals waste time leaking salty water out of their faces and grimacing, psychopaths (and indeed pragmatic neurotypicals) are working out how to solve the problem they’re faced with…”

          Most adults don’t get an emotional breakdown every time life throws shit at them, lol. Teaching children the basics for how to sort out their problems by themselves is kind of what parents are supposed to do. Kids aren’t as emotionally stable as adults because that makes it easier for their brains to develop. Pragmatic neurotypicals are just people who have figured out how to overcome fear, not give in to anger, not take themselves too seriously and especially not take everything people say too seriously either, but rather pay attention to their behavior in the longer term.

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  • James 14:21 on May 12, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: anti-Semitism, , demonic psychopaths, demons, emotions, , , illuminati, , mythbusters, myths, myths about psychopaths, myths and reality, , , neurology, , , , , psychosis, , reptiles, retards, ,   

    Mythbusting psychopathy (part the second) 

    Related image

    Here we are again, back to kick more stupid myths into the long grass where they belong.

    What myths or misconceptions about things would you like to bust, if only people would listen?

     

    MYTH: Psychopaths have no emotions.

    This is one myth psychopaths themselves (and narcissists) love to propagate to enhance their mystique, but it’s bullshit. Everyone has emotions. The only living people with no emotions are comatose or else so severely brain-damaged they can only live with the help of a life-support machine. Even dementia patients with little or no sense of self, a completely blank memory and utter dependency on caregivers show signs of emotion when properly stimulated.

    Psychopathic emotions are selfish and inward-looking. In my experience, these emotions are often fleeting and can change rapidly. Some emotions are very blunted and don’t really cause much of a change in mood, while others can be so strong they temporarily obsess or enthral the psychopath. It can also be the case that the physical signs of an emotion are there (e.g. sweaty palms, quick heart rate, out of breath) but the psychopath feels calm in themselves, in their mind.

     

    MYTH: Psychopaths are crazy, or ‘psychotic’

    Psychopathy and psychosis are two different things. Just because a word looks similar, doesn’t mean they refer to the same thing. Psychotic people are people who have lost their grip on reality; they may hear voices, hallucinate or show magical thinking. They are very much not in control of their behaviour and generally need close medical attention for their own and others’ safety. Many otherwise healthy people suffer from psychotic episodes throughout their lives, and often recover with time or medication. Schizophrenia is an example of a psychotic disorder.

    Psychopaths are fully aware of their surroundings, their behaviour and the consequences of that behaviour. Psychopaths do not have a conscience, and are not unwell in the normal sense of the word, nor will they ‘recover’ with time or medical help. As a personality disorder with roots in an individual’s genetic makeup, this is who they are for life. Both psychopaths and psychotic people can be dangerous and violent, but many are not.

    “I’m not strange, weird, off, nor crazy, my reality is just different from yours.” – the Cheshire Cat

    There is absolutely no reason I can see why a psychopath couldn’t develop a psychotic disorder separate to and unaffected by their psychopathy. This is called co-morbidity. In fact anyone can reach sub-clinical psychosis simply by staying awake for abnormally long periods of time (symptoms start kicking in beyond the 36 hour mark). I’ve tried it once or twice; it’s an interesting experience, though not an especially pleasant one. I heard shouting voices in my head and felt off balance when I tried to walk. Overall, my memory of the experience is fuzzy. Yay, temporary brain damage!

    Oh, while we’re on this subject, unlike what certain pop psychology crackpots would have you believe, “psychopathology” is not the study of psychopaths, nor is it anything whatsoever to do with psychopaths. Psychopathology is the psychiatric version of pathology, therefore it is the study of all mental illnesses and psychological disorders / abnormalities. I repeat, similar-looking words don’t always have the same meaning!

     

    MYTH: My psychopathic ex planned to ensnare, manipulate and abuse me from the start of our relationship

    Psychopaths enter relationships in a very positive frame of mind; they often love everything about the other person and are so obsessed they want to learn every tiny little detail about them, know their entire history and the full spectrum of their emotions and thoughts. In extreme cases, the psychopath may have a painful urge to possess or climb inside their new partner. They try to please the other person by mirroring them closely and being the ideal mate for them.

    After a period of time, this effort is exhausting and the other person starts to lose their appeal. Most psychopaths’ relationships stall at this point as the other person ceases to have any interest. It’s all just the same old person, same old stuff. Boredom sets in, and the psychopath either moves on without a backward glance (I prefer this), or else takes their anger and frustration out on the other person.

    I have no citation for this and am just recounting from experience; you’ll just have to take my word for it (or not). If anyone can find actual research done in this field that contradicts me and not just pull up Lovefraud or similar bilge, that would be very welcome.

     

    MYTH: Psychopaths are in all the positions of power and are the puppet masters behind an international conspiracy to bring about a new world order.

    Image result for illuminati funnyWhile there are undoubtedly psychopaths in high places, including bankers, businesspeople and world leaders, the idea of them all working together behind the scenes for not just years, but decades, is frankly absurd.

    Listen, I don’t have any evidence to back this up, but psychopaths are not nearly co-operative enough for this to work. We don’t tend to get on well with each other, and are not known for our willingness to work in teams. Every single one of the conspirators would want the top job in the Illuminati and would be working to eliminate the competition, i.e. each other. The bloody thing would not get off the ground.

    And of course, when you realise this is the exact same idea as the Evil Zionist conspiracy theory, the exact same poisonous garbage just with the word “Jew” switched for “psychopath”, you know what kind of beast you’re dealing with.

     

    MYTH: Psychopaths are lizard men in skinsuits

    No, just no. You are welcome to verify that by getting hold of your nearest psychopath and opening him up to check all his lungs and bones and whatever else you humans have inside you are in the right place. You might need the help of a surgeon, except she’ll probably be a psychopath too and will naturally be in league with one of her kind, so you see the flaw in the plan? But seriously, demonising people (even psychopaths) is, apart from being rather insulting, a lazy way out of trying to understand why others are different. Speaking of demonisation…

     

    MYTH: Psychopaths are demons from hell

    Hell is a fairy tale designed to scare the gullible into obeying the clergy – who as you’ll remember are all psychopaths of course. The idea of demons may well originate from uneducated mediaeval people’s encounters with illnesses they couldn’t explain, such as epilepsy and schizophrenia. In fact, enough ignorants are still unconvinced about this that there is a whole department of the Royal College of Surgeons dedicated to correcting idiotic superstitions among certain communities.

    Despite the hysterical imaginations of cretins who swear they’ve seen a satanic glint in the eyes of their psychopath, I assure you I am not a demon, I am a liz-… human like you (I’m assuming here. If there are any non-humans reading this, I’d love to hear from you.)

    Talk to me. Read part 1 here.

     
    • Amaterasu Solar 15:53 on May 12, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Excellent article, James. Indeed, I have had many mistake psychotic with psychopathic. But I will explain that indeed there ARE psychopaths in control on this planet, who inbreed to retain the psychopathic gene. In fact, grasping that psychopaths alone would not think much past Themselves to a future They would likely not see in Their lifetime, I was at first mystified by the clear (to Me, I suppose) evidence of a very long-term plan, a generational plan, being played out before Us on the literal world stage (what We see are actors following a script written by Ones We do not see and who have the ultimate control). I have theories, and My highest probability goes to an ET influence that has these top level psychopaths convinced that They are doing “satan’s” work (“Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic.” – Arthur C Clarke).

      Others give highest probability that it IS “satan,” or demons, or interdimensional Beings, or other metaphysical elements. As I have no evidence that such metaphysical things exist, but, in reading ancient texts and legends from around the globe, I feel I have enough to suggest ET has been interacting with Our planet a long while and that ET lives substantially longer than do We. I favor things that have 3D+T explanations, and so ET is My highest probability.

      Overall, though, a very good explanation of things.

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      • James 09:43 on May 13, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        Thank you for your praise, it’s always welcome. I’m glad you enjoyed the article.

        Unfortunately the rest of your comment would indicate a psychosis on your part, though I understand if you don’t see it that way. I do not believe in Satan or the supernatural, and since the validity of your claims seem to based on the assumption that both exist and play an active role in shaping the universe, I can’t possibly take your claims seriously, so won’t even pretend to.

        Don’t take this the wrong way, I still like you 🙂

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        • Amaterasu Solar 11:18 on May 13, 2017 Permalink | Reply

          Hardly “psychosis.” Decades of research and a keen grasp that money promotes psychopaths to power, aiding in promoting Them to power in top-down controlmind (government) systems. You can dismiss My observations, and I will still like You as well. [smile]

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      • Zachary 07:50 on May 27, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        Lmafo.
        What a twat

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    • nowve666 16:22 on May 12, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      ROTFLMAO!!! I laughed my head off reading that. These myths that annoy me of course were funny to read about in your debunking article. I really liked what you said about relationships. That’s such a refreshing insight after all the bull about “lovebombing” as if we just stalked future love partners as prey and pretended interest (for what end?). Of course, some people could do that in order to get money from someone who has it. These people don’t need to be psychopaths. And NTs sometimes fall in love rapidly and then lose interest too. But then the person jilted can go to Lovefraud and call that person a “psychopath” whether he was or not.

      The myth about psychopaths ruling the world and causing all the problems is one I find particularly irksome. I’m glad you compared it to the anti-Semitic myths, particularly about the Rothschilds. As a Jew, I get pissed off whenever I hear this, especially when it comes from people who are otherwise politically sympathisch. I even blogged about the similarities between anti-psychopath scapegoating and the anti-Semitic kind.

      I laughed myself silly over the one about the reptiles. I think our moms would have noticed upon giving birth if their baby had scaly skin and so forth. Ditto to the one about demons. It’s human, all-too-human to want to demonize people who push our buttons. I don’t think people can face the fact that behavior they disapprove of is part of the human spectrum. I also don’t think anybody deserves to go to Hell. Not even Ronald Reagan, the person I most loath. The fact that most people (at least in the Western world) believe God, a supreme being would put anyone in such a place for all eternity only goes to show how dark the human psyche is capable of being.

      Thank you for this excellent post and for being my friend.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Amaterasu Solar 18:07 on May 12, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        I may point out that if psychopaths were NOT in control, thet the bulk of the planet flows to very Few here, and They choose not to truly help – 99% of money donated by ANYONE to “charities” goes to pay ridiculous salaries at the high end – and given that some of these People could end poverty ten and more times over yet choose not to…suggests psychopathy. If They were caring Beings, They would be caring for Humanity… And given the psychopathic things We see – GMO’s, “geoengineering” with toxic elements, fake events touted as “reality,” and on and on… It becomes clear the Ones at the top are, indeed, psychopaths, inbreeding to retain the psychopath gene.

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        • nowve666 18:52 on May 12, 2017 Permalink | Reply

          There is a basic logical error here. You point out that there are lots of things wrong with the world we live in.
          Then you jump to the conclusion that it must be because psychopaths are in control of the world. What you are missing is a causal link between these two propositions. You assume that anyone who does anything wrong or unethical must be a psychopath. If that were true, there would be many more psychopaths than the 1% estimated by the experts. Have you looked at the PCL-R, the “gold standard” test for psychopathy? There are 20 items on the list. You only mention one: lack of caring.

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          • Amaterasu Solar 11:15 on May 13, 2017 Permalink | Reply

            The causal link? Money. The accounting for Human energy added into the system, required to survive. “If You have to account for Your energy to anOther to survive, You are NOT free; You are a slave.”

            That power over Others that money provides is what give the psychopaths in control the drive to get it and retain it. Money systems promote psychopaths to power.

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            • nowve666 12:16 on May 13, 2017 Permalink | Reply

              So only psychopaths go for money? Psychopaths like money. Nons also like money. Don’t tell me you don’t like money, Amaterasu. Everyone likes money. That doesn’t mean that everyone has money. Nor have you shown that have more than anyone else. Psychopaths exist on every level of the class structure. What “decades of research?” And doesn’t money promote whomever has it to power, psychopath or not?

              You talk about ETs but offered no evidence that ETs are working with psychopaths. I don’t think you’re psychotic. I just think you need to study the syllogism. Wikipedia says, “A syllogism (Greek: συλλογισμός syllogismos, ‘conclusion, inference’) is a kind of logical argument that applies deductive reasoning to arrive at a conclusion based on two or more propositions that are asserted or assumed to be true.” You start with a premise. For example, if your premise is “only psychopaths seek and get money,” then follow it with “only people with money have power,” your conclusion can be “psychopaths have all the power.” But your first premise is wrong. Psychopaths are not the only ones who seek and get money (and power). Therefore, your syllogism breaks down.

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              • Amaterasu Solar 14:47 on May 13, 2017 Permalink | Reply

                I did not say only psychopaths go for money – surely We all do as that is how We survive on this planet. BUT, psychopaths are the Ones who will do ANYTHING to get money/power over Others. And They do, accumulating money/power over Others far more than Others who have limits to what They will do for it, because of conscience and caring.

                And I don’t think the THEORY of ET needs proof. Geez. Did You notice I gave it as a theory based on ancient texts and legends. If I had proof, it wouldn’t be a theory, now would it. I am just saying that the plans, the scripts written, are clearly generational. And without some long-term direction, psychopaths would not work for things that are beyond Their life span. Ergo I THEORIZE an ET involvement on this planet. A PSYCHOPATHIC ET involvement.

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                • nowve666 16:16 on May 13, 2017 Permalink | Reply

                  Ama, your proposition that “psychopaths are the Ones who will do ANYTHING to get money/power over Others,” must be based on the fact that we do not have a conscience. Since freedom from conscience enables us to do anything, you assume that we WILL do anything to get money/power. I addressed that issue in my blog at https://kiasherosjourney.wordpress.com/2016/04/16/free-to-choose/ where I pointed out the freedom to do something doesn’t mean that we will inevitably do it. There are reasons why a psychopath wouldn’t “do anything for money.” In my case, I never really cared about money as long as I had enough to satisfy my rather modest desires. Sure, I could hold up a liquor store, I suppose. That would get me more money but it could also get me a stretch of prison time. I don’t want money that badly. Furthermore, as James and I have both tried to point out, non-psychopaths can and have done terrible things for money. If they are not psychopaths, they probably feel guilty afterwards. Having a conscience doesn’t prevent everyone from doing wrong. You just can’t assume someone is a psychopath because he has done something you consider terrible. That’s why they have tests and expert diagnoses.

                  I wasn’t poo-pooing the idea that there are extra-terrestrials. I just think the idea that they are in league with psychopaths is far-fetched.

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                  • Amaterasu Solar 16:58 on May 13, 2017 Permalink | Reply

                    I am not saying that ALL psychopaths WILL do that. I am saying that MANY of Them will. While Those who are not psychopaths will stop short, in high probability, thereby giving the many psychopaths that will do anything the upper hand in gaining power over Others. Ergo, money systems promote psychopaths. And money long ago promoted certain families (ones We seldom hear of, even) to the top, and They inbreed to retain the gene, and have a generational plan to take over the planet – and the reason I give highest probability for Them doing this is that there is some influence that is directing Them, that has a longer life span than Us Humans. Else there would be no such “new world order” plan.

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                    • James 18:03 on May 13, 2017 Permalink | Reply

                      But there is no “new world order” plan, so that solves that 😛

                      Trust me, Amy, we do not have enough family loyalty to spend our lives on a plan that only our great-great-great-grandchildren might benefit from. Your theory of psychopathic families hatching a plot over centuries doesn’t hold water. Now there may be a type of personality that does behave in that way, but they are not psychopaths because their behaviour is illogical from a psychopathic point of view. If I’m going to enact a new world order to put me in charge of planet Earth, I’m going to do it now, while I’m still around to enjoy it. Fuck future generations, I wouldn’t even share power with my living family, nevermind some hypothetical descendants.

                      As for being directed by ET; fuck ET! ET would be my bitch, not the other way around.

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                      • Amaterasu Solar 19:05 on May 13, 2017 Permalink

                        That’s why We can find “leaders” like George H W Bush talking about it. MANY of Them have brought up the NWO. So I guess We can concluded it’s fictional, right? Do a search for quote “New World Order” and see just how many “leaders” have brought it up.

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                      • nowve666 20:54 on May 13, 2017 Permalink

                        Our money has “Novus Ordo Seclorum” under a truncated pyramid. I guess that’s Latin for “New World Order” “Thus the motto Novus ordo seclorum can be translated as “A new order of the ages.” It was proposed by Charles Thomson, the Latin expert who was involved in the design of the Great Seal of the United States, to signify “the beginning of the new American Era” as of the date of the Declaration of Independence.” So this is a very old thing. Dates all the way back to the Declaration of Independence. You think the Founding Fathers were psychopaths?

                        Seriously, Amy. The “New World Order” is talked about a lot. But that doesn’t make it any more “real” than the Illuminati nor God, for that matter. These things have a certain meaning but not the conspiratorial one that’s so popular on the internet. And, as James said, psychopaths are not into that kind of sacrificial planning that would be needed to build some future dystopia. We’re more into the here and now.

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                      • James 03:59 on May 14, 2017 Permalink

                        The “NWO” mentioned on your banknotes is, and always was, the shifting of power away from the old world of empires and kings and towards the New World, i.e. America. That has pretty much happened over the past 200 years, and now the pendulum is swinging the other way, back east and towards Asia for the first time in about six centuries. I’d say the “New” World Order was a bit past its sell by date, wouldn’t you?

                        Liked by 1 person

                      • nowve666 13:14 on May 14, 2017 Permalink

                        My point. The NWO is nothing new. Just as the Illuminati was an ancient order in Bavaria that had nothing to do with the conspiracy theories, the NWO is basically a concept politicians can now evoke when needed. It can mean whatever someone wants it to mean.

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                      • Amaterasu Solar 08:33 on May 14, 2017 Permalink

                      • James 03:54 on May 14, 2017 Permalink

                        Or you could show me a video clip of at least one leader mentioning it 🙂

                        Anyway, you fixated on the least important part of my comment. Fact is, I can’t prove there’s no NWO conspiracy (just as you can’t prove there is one), but I have made a good stab at proving it’s not psychopaths. How about addressing that, largest and most important point of my comment?

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      • James 09:54 on May 13, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        Yes, when I hatched out of my egg, my mother was quick to dismiss any fleeting similarities between myself and Gary, our pet gecko.

        Hell is a brutal concept really, and I can see how people might believe it justified for really horrible individuals to go there for a limited period of time, but an eternity of neverending torture seems unjustly cruel even for someone like Stalin or Hitler (or Reagan). I can understand centuries, maybe even millennia, of agonising punishment being reasonably well-deserved, but an eternity? God is one cold motherfucker. It’s ridiculously out of proportion to any evil even the worst human is capable of committing.

        Liked by 1 person

        • nowve666 10:08 on May 13, 2017 Permalink | Reply

          Right. As mortals, we are incapable of infinite evil. We are finite. Infinite punishment for finite crimes is absurd.

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    • Amaterasu Solar 17:17 on May 16, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Well this is weird. I got an email of a post here by nowve666 discussing the cremation of care ceremony at Bohemian Grove (something I already knew about this), and other stuff which She rightly points out supports My research on the psychopaths in control. But when I get here… It’s not. Can’t see it anywhere. Any clue what’s up there?

      Liked by 1 person

    • nowve666 17:52 on May 16, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Amy, I can’t see it either. How weird. Maybe James didn’t approve it.

      Liked by 1 person

  • James 18:00 on April 28, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , dreams, emotions, fun, hallucination, , , questions,   

    Do psychopaths dream? 

    Scary Painting

    Sweet dreams

    It is a question that is often posed by the victims of psychopaths, by people who have known them, and just by the curious. In fact, when you type “do psychopaths” into Google, the search suggestions are as follows:

    1. do psychopaths cry?
    2. do psychopaths feel fear?
    3. do psychopaths yawn?
    4. do psychopaths love?
    5. do psychopaths dream?

    The first four are boring questions, and very easy to answer by anyone who ever gave them any thought:

    1. Rarely
    2. Yes, but hardly. Fearlessness is one of the main criteria in the PCL-R
    3. You might as well ask, “do psychopaths need to breathe?” Yes, we yawn when we’re tired, just like you!
    4. Nah

    But the fifth question is interesting. Its answer isn’t immediately obvious a priori and it tries to delve into the inner worlds of psychopaths in a clever way. What’s more, it’s one question to which, despite its popularity among inquisitive souls, is difficult to find a satisfactory answer, amid tedious conversations that go nowhere, and threads where everyone says equally plausible but mutually contradictory things.

    Well look no further, because I am a psychopath, and I can confirm that yes, I dream. I don’t dream very often (or at least I don’t often remember my dreams), in fact more often than not I have the stereotypical “death sleep” of a vampire, unburdened by thoughts and concerns from the day. I don’t have sleepless or disturbed nights because of stress, and I don’t lie awake mulling over ‘bad’ things I’ve done. But I do, on occasion, dream. My dreams tend to be fairly weird, though nothing so surreal as to inspire artwork.

    One recent dream I had, there was a bird trapped inside my room, beating its wings pointlessly against the closed window. As I walked over to open the window and free it, it seemed to panic and fly at me, so I hit it to stop it pecking me and it fell to the floor, dead. A couple of nights ago, I dreamt the house next door was on fire. The family that lives there has three children and two dogs, and they were also trapped upstairs (noticing a pattern yet?) I dialled for the emergency services, but when the fire brigade arrived, they had brought the police and accused me of setting the fire, which as far as I can recall, I hadn’t. In both dreams, I tried to do the decent thing, but the other ‘characters’ in the dream had other ideas and did their best to throw my help back in my face. I’m not really into dream interpretation, but if anyone wants to have a go at figuring these ones out, be my guest.

    Most commonly, I’m not even in my own dreams. Or rather, I’m like a static observer or an omniscient narrator, and the other people in the dream are acting out a story in front of me. Usually they’re not people that I know in real life, just ‘characters’ that inhabit the dream world. Sometimes I can go in and out of different people and take control of them for a while, make them do what I want to do, see the dream from their perspective, and then fly out and go back to watching again. These dreams tend to be violent, and seem to be set predominantly in horror movies or wars, but there’s not really any emotional content to them or consequences for being in them. Like I said, I’m more of a bystander watching things happen. Even when I ‘take over’ the characters, what happens to them doesn’t really end up affecting me. If the person I’m inhabiting gets hacked to death, then I just fly out of them and look down on their mutilated corpse with detached interest.

    Scary Painting

    are made of this

    Very occasionally I dream of people close to me dying. In real life, this sort of event doesn’t cause much emotion in me. If I liked the person, I am sorry they’re no longer around for me to enjoy them, but the idea of crying about it is utterly foreign. However, in these dreams, I’m very upset, grief-stricken even, in a way I have never been in my waking life. I seem to imagine myself as an ordinary, empathetic person, crying about the death of someone I love, just like I’ve seen other people be around death, and being really cut up about their loss. Unlike the previous two types of dream, these are closer to what I would think of as a nightmare, in that they’re actually unpleasant to experience. I don’t enjoy feeling those emotions, or at least dreaming that I am feeling them, and I especially don’t enjoy losing control of myself. Then, when I wake up, I’m back to normal. My pillow is sometimes wet; whether with tears or sweat, I don’t know. But I just think “huh, that was weird”, and go about my day.

     

    I have no idea if these dreams bear any resemblance to the sorts of dreams other people have. I’d be interested to hear from you.

    Art credit goes to the extremely creative, extremely talented and extremely dead Zdzisław Beksiński.

    I wonder if he’s living his dreams now?

     
    • nowve666 18:37 on April 28, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      When I was a child, I had repetitive dreams. I had dreams of exploring. I dreamed I was on a beach. My favorite dream was I am on a beach and a giant tidal wave comes over the entire beach. There is no way to avoid it. I am swept out to sea. But I can breath under water.

      We spent a summer on a farm and there was a cross rooster who scared all the kids. One night, I dreamed I loved the rooster. After that, I wasn’t afraid of him but that same day, they slaughtered him. I cried and cried and swore I would never stop crying. However, later, they served him for dinner and I ate him. He was delicious.

      One more childhood dream. I dreamed I turned into a monster. I got very tall, I was all the way up to the ceiling. I knew if my parents saw me, they would know I was a monster and destroy me so I knew I had to kill them. The dream didn’t go any further however.

      As an adult, Vicki and I like to watch our favorite movies on our DVD player. I often fall asleep. I watch the DVD from my bed. I enjoy the kind of twilight state of sleeping and intermittently waking to see the screen. I almost always think I’m seeing the window at first. Then I realize it’s the TV. The movie and the dream kind of merge.

      As far as emotions in dreams go, I experienced a lot of euphoria, especially when dreaming of the beach. When I was in the nut house, I had a scary dream about a nurse who worked there. In my dream, she was evil and powerful. After I woke up, I still felt creepy about her until I talked to my shrink and we worked out the dream was about feeling unable to communicate. After that, she didn’t bother me.

      Oh! And I had a dream after I saw The Exorcist. That is the only movie that ever scared me. In the dream, In saw Regan’s head twisting around like it did in the movie and she had a really evil look on her face. Then I realized I can witness evil without being consumed by it and my fear went away both in the dream and in real life related to the movie.

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      • James 19:00 on April 28, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        You have a better memory for dreams than me. There’s no way I could remember such details from dreams years and years ago. Your subconscious is clearly more creative than mine. Interesting that you have had “scary dreams”. I don’t think I’ve ever been scared by a dream.

        Some pisshead just tried to scare me (in real life) by shouting “ALRIGHT, MATE!” at the top of his voice. He and his friend were drinking behind a tree in the shadows, so I hadn’t seen them, but I don’t jump or have any sort of fight / fight response, so I just called back “I’m great. How’s it going with you?” They were drunk enough to just laugh, so I left them to it.

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    • 1jaded1 23:48 on April 28, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Hi James. This is most interesting. The responses to the first 4 questions made me laugh. The response to the 5th…idk and am not a psychologist…iatrist…analyst or anything. Sounds like a battle though. Wanting to help and being pecked…Feeling upset in a dream where you wouldn’t be upset if you were awake.

      Since you asked….and not that you may care other than amusement.

      My dreams consist of paranormal. Entities want to eat me. They would starve bc I lost my soul at a very early age. Some want to protect.

      This week has been a cluster fk of nightmares. Tuesday, I dreamt that a lady wanted to kill me bc it should have been me. When I was allowed to make sense , I should have had my face peeled off at the pinball machine. I elected to use the washroom. Total made up dream. I didn’t see anyone’s face peeled off. Maybe a narcissist mask. Maybe I am one.

      The side by sides last night revolved around calls to 911. The leaser of the traumatic had the operator wanting me to verify my date of birth and a newspaper article on the date of me calling… My co-worker passed our.. I asked wtf any purpose that had.

      The more disturbing one had my ex who has NPD beating my parents to a pulp. My sister and I called 911 for2 assaults, but they only sent one ambulance. My dad (who is already deceased) told me he was dying and to have the amby take my mom. Then he died in front of me. I woke up traumatised and called my mom. Lol. It is still sticking hence my response. Subconscious is my ex wants to get back into my life and take agression out on family? Who knows? So disturbing . i want nothing more to do with him.

      Thank you for your post. TMI in my response? Okay. Question was asked..

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      • James 11:06 on April 29, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        Thank you for reading and for your comment. I wonder, do you feel at all better for having written all that? I got a certain cathartic pleasure from writing my dreams out, though yours seem to be more closely connected to the real world and your fears about things going wrong. Have you any reason to think your ex may be trying to get back into your life?

        Liked by 1 person

    • 1jaded1 20:28 on April 29, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      You are welcome. It sometimes helps to release the dreams through writing. My ex is trying to contact me and I am ignoring him.

      Like

    • TypicalCritter 14:36 on September 24, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      You sure have a remarkable ability to recall your dreams. I’m kind of curious whether you made these little dream stories up as a little experiment, to test if the readers interpretations go in the direction you had hoped, or if you are actually describing your own dreams. Anyways, they are pretty facinating either way.

      I’ll do an honest attempt to describe which details I find most interesting. So here we go:

      Dream 1: An animal that normally to detects and avoid predators effortlessly has found it’s way into your room, the bird seems to be fairly confused to begin with and has no idea how to get out. It sees you and attacks instead of trying evade you, also unusual behavior for an escape artist. You try to remove a confused fragile little bird but, a small flash of impulsive agression from your part is all it takes to kill it. Maybe you have had previous experiences where you tried to interact with someone experiencing confusion as well as anxiety or fear and they reacted both too quick and unexpected, before you could figure out an appropriate way to respond.

      Dream 2: The people next door does not seem to be any more rational than that bird. They are not messing around, they make it very clear that they don’t believe what you say, they are convinced you are the source of their misfortune. If they immediately assume you were the reason their house was on fire, does that mean they have been holding a grudge against you for some time without you being aware of it? Could it be that there are a side to those people you weren’t aware of, could they be using the fire as an oppourtunity to both get rid you and find an excuse to tell the insurance company, covering up their own mistakes? Or does their behavior in some ways reflect your impression of people in panic, do they get both irrational and unpredictable?

      Dream 3: These types of dreams sounds like they are more like lucid dreams. You seem to be aware that you are dreaming and you can control, or at least have a strong influence on what happens. I kind of get the impression that they are kind of like a sandbox or videogame where you can interact with the characters and see what happens when you try the different dialogue options. This “sandbox theme” is the only part that sounds more different than what I can relate to personally. The violence part is not particularly psychopathic, even people with the least psychopathic traits can be extremely violent. Non agressive people with no history of violence can have both violent dreams and fantasies, both being a way to maintain behavior.

      Dream 4: Not sure if I understand you properly, do you see yourself unvoluntarily behaving as if you were feeling sadness and grief? Because if you do feel any extent of sadness and grief in your dream, then that happens for real, that part of the brain is not very good at telling the difference between dream or not. Since psychopathic brains seem to have an impaired ability to recall memories of those types of emotions, I can imagine those dreams are pretty confusing if you try to recall them. As you probably know, the current theory is that emotions like sadness, fear, guilt and shame occur more like background noise in psychopathic brains, too weak to have any inpact under normal waking consciousness. Apparently they can get amplified enough to be overwhelming during psychosis, believe it or not.

      Liked by 1 person

    • James 16:38 on September 25, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      They were all true dreams, yes. No fake news here 😉 1and 2 were recent dreams (relative to the publication date), while 3 and 4 are recurring.

      Your interpretations are intriguing, and I especially like the idea of the hysterical neighbours reflecting my impression of panic. Crises and imminent danger are the absolute worst times to get swept up in panic, but I guess the panickers can’t help themselves.

      Just to clarify number 3, most of the violence is committed by other characters in the dream, not by me.

      I did not know that current theory; thanks for sharing. It makes sense actually; I’d never claim to have never felt any of those emotions, just that when I did, they didn’t last very long. From what I understand about guilt and shame, they are more effective when they last longer, and really get a chance to turn the thumbscrew on a person’s conscience.

      I’m kind of curious about your last sentence. Is it that psychopaths find emotions overwhelming when experiencing psychosis, or everyone?

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      • TypicalCritter 08:05 on October 6, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        Regarding number 3, I wasn’t assuming you were taking part in the violence, it’s more that since you describe it as a recurring theme, I kind wonder if you have some facination with violence in general. Are these types of dreams more vivid than average? Just as an experiment, if you were to compare these types of dreams to somewhat similar experiences of watching people getting badly injured in real life, would that make more of an impression on you, or about the same?

        The reason why I’m curious of this is because of a principle explained by Niels Birbaumer, where he states that seeing (for example injury in) other people are more abstract than an intuitive to psychopathic individuals, because (among other things) their ability to form memories of unpleasant bodily experiences is severly impaired. This in turns mess up the developement of an intuitive ability to anticipate painful or unpleasant experiences in both themselves and others, making highly psychopathic individuals in many ways detached from their body (and in a sense, from themselves). So I can imagine feeling vulnerable themselves would be pretty foreign, in childhood this can make (more) careful people pretty confusing to play with. Over time this could be the root cause of an refined ability to spot vulnerability in other people.

        Regarding guildt and shame, you could say that it’s the threat of re-experiencing those unpleasant emotions (ability to anticipate them) that makes up the foundations for developing an intuition for what’s ok to do and what’s not.

        I was explained by someone working in a mental health ward that psychopaths suffering from for example a drug induced psychosis are in no way having an easier time in that state. I don’t know if there has been done any studies on this, so sorry to dissapoint that it’s second hand anecdotal stuff. As you probably know, psychosis is more or less scrambled reality. Sometimes emotional regulation stay fairly intact in some people, other times not. In psychopathic brains an impaired ability to regulate is balanced out by low emotional impulses. In a drug induced psychosis, what happens if those emotional impulses get amplified? Panic and confusion could suddenly become a real thing.

        Liked by 1 person

        • James 13:06 on October 7, 2017 Permalink | Reply

          I’m not sure what kind of life you think I lead where I’m often encountering people getting badly injured. Can’t say that anything springs to mind as being memorable. Other people’s injuries don’t figure so much, except when those injuries prevent the person doing stuff with me we both enjoyed. Idiot friend fell 12ft off a ladder onto concrete so can’t come hiking with me anymore like we used to, so I haven’t got much use for him anymore. You could say “in childhood this can make (more) careful people pretty confusing to play with.” still applies now, but the confusion is now irritation…

          I’m not a “highly psychopathic individual” either. I score 28 on the PCL-R, where the top score is 40 (“highly psychopathic individual”) and the average score among the general population is between 0 and 2. If you’re looking for a real nutter to run experiments on, I’m not your man. We’ve all heard that oft-repeated and possibly made-up anecdote of the psychopathic prisoner being shown pictures of faces exhibiting a variety of emotions. The prisoner performs exceptionally well until shown a fearful face, “Hmm. I’m not sure about this one. I couldn’t put a name to it, but that’s what people look like before I kill them.”

          Thanks for the explanation re: psychosis. It’s pretty cool that you have a contact in a mental health ward.

          Regarding dreams, my mother coincidentally told me about one she had two nights ago. She dreamt I was a murderer, but that dream-James was blissfully unaware of doing anything wrong; while my family were frantically trying to seek legal advice I was just carrying on as normal (dream logic, eh?). She described it as a nightmare that made her skin crawl and woke up badly shaken and relieved.

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          • TypicalCritter 16:56 on October 8, 2017 Permalink | Reply

            Just clear up a few misunderstandings, you don’t strike me as super psychopathic and I was not assuming you were encountering badly injured people frequently. I mean come on, if you live anywhere with a lot of people the chances are pretty high that you will witness something sooner or later. If it makes an impression on you, it could just as well be because you got curious how it happened. I do anyway, I know that part would stick to my memory a lot more than how I might have felt a little unconfortable. Do I think psychopathic traits make a good predictor for violent behavior? Probably not, environment on the other hand, different story. At least my understanding is that it’s really about how the brain process stimuli differently when it comes to psychopathic traits. That’s why I find it interesting to read about how you describe your dreams. I’m not trying to make them fit with personal biased views. Do you see what I’m getting at, and am I completely off track?

            Also I could probably have phrased it differently, better and to my defence I’m not as good at expressing my thinking as you are, lol.

            The example you gave was a pretty good one, so thank you for that and also for taking the time to answer my interpretations. Also your mothers dream was very interesting.

            Another thing, If I thougth you were highly psychopathic I wouldn’t have bothered attempting to interpret those dreams you described. The reason is that I find mild manered people with threshold psychopathy far more interesting to interact with, they see the world differently and they have figured out how to balance the benefits and drawbacks that come with having psychopathic traits.

            Also I find it kind odd that so many people think top politicians or billionares are mostly highly intellegent people with high psychopathic traits and that they are the root cause of everything from wars, finance crises, climate change, capitalism and annoying shitty tv shows. Those theories fail to take into account all the actual dangerous factors in society like ideology, deregulation, structural flaws and the fact that group mentality and shortsighted solutions tend to get the better of us.

            Just to clear up some other biases. Do I know psychopathic people? A few and no, they have not made any trouble for me. I don’t see them as dangerous, that category are reserved for the lunatics with bipolar, schizophrenia, major narcissism and/or APD. I personally have the impression that it’s the right combination of high intelligence, sensitivity to reward, a little APD and maybe a bit of narcissism that makes it easier to reach the top positions in society. Those people are willing to cross boundries, are very fluent in manipulation and don’t look back.

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            • James 19:02 on October 8, 2017 Permalink | Reply

              “Also I find it kind odd that so many people think top politicians or billionares are mostly highly intellegent people with high psychopathic traits and that they are the root cause of everything from wars, finance crises, climate change, capitalism and annoying shitty tv shows. Those theories fail to take into account all the actual dangerous factors in society like ideology, deregulation, structural flaws and the fact that group mentality and shortsighted solutions tend to get the better of us.” You, sir, are a fucking godsend to this site. You’ve probably seen some of the painfully unintelligent stuff some of the other contributors have posted. But you have a nuanced view of things backed by an understanding of geopolitics. I like it.

              So, who am I talking to? You know a bit about me, it only seems courteous to ask about the man or woman of mystery with friends in crazy places. You evidently have an aptitude for psychiatry; is it just an amateur interest like mine, or something more professional?

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              • TypicalCritter 08:06 on October 16, 2017 Permalink | Reply

                It’s just an amateur interest in neurology, pharmacology and genetics. It does help to have a relative with a high degree of narcissism who suffers from varying degree of delusions and has a history of impulsive violence, parasitic lifestyle and manipulating people.

                Just the mix of traits some people mistake for psychopathy, which has reminded me more than a few times how useful it would be if more people would learn to recognise traits in people, acknowledge that they are there, and not get too obsessed with categoric labels like psychopath, narcissistic- or antisocial- personality disorders.

                I also have to give credit to books like “Swimming with sharks” by Joris Luyendijk and Kevin Duttons work for giving me a more nuanced view. Destructive culture/ideology can make most people almost blind to what’s really going on. If you want things to change then change rules of the game, don’t hope for every player to regulate themselves.

                Also it’s very useful to know a bit about neurology and pharmacology when you have the non-hyperactive/impulsive variation of adhd. Which is a very misundestood diagnosis among a lot of health professionals, they often have a hard time when it comes to being able to tell it apart from other conditions. Also it doesn’t help that most people belive in simplified ridiciluous stereotypes perpetuated by media and quackery.

                Liked by 1 person

                • James 13:06 on October 16, 2017 Permalink | Reply

                  It doesn’t help that most people are idiots. You know it to be true.

                  So, I’m guessing you use your knowledge of neurology and pharmacology to speak to health professionals who really should know better (again, idiots), to convince them of the reality of your condition. Does that save on disagreements, or do people just think you’re trying to do their job for them?

                  Amateur interests are often the most worthwhile, given that they don’t carry the same possibility of bias as with a professional or academic (having to reflect your employer’s ethos) or self-interest (wanting to keep your job).

                  Kevin Dutton has (I think – it’s been a while since I read his stuff) proposed that workplaces adapt themselves to work with employees showing psychopathic traits – not bending the rules as such, but by encouraging and rewarding behaviour that is beneficial to the psychopath, which is obviously a must as otherwise nothing productive will get done, and also beneficial to the company / hospital / newspaper / government / whatever.

                  The much-maligned bankers’ bonuses are one industry-specific example of this, but Dutton evokes a more holistic approach: hiring psychopaths to do the sort of job a psychopath would enjoy and be good at, while using rewards to encourage manipulation and aggression in the ‘right’ way (i.e. what is beneficial for the job) and not in the ‘wrong’ way (stealing from the company, bullying workmates).

                  None of this will happen without some kind of educational and cultural revolution however. People are currently too ignorant, and too fearful. Kudos to Dutton and his friend Andy McNab for The Good Psychopath’s Guide to Success.

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