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  • James 19:02 on October 2, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: au bout de la terre, bereavement, cancer, , family, , grief, , , RIP,   

    Grief 

    The way other people treat the deaths of celebrities is grief at its best, according to this psychopath.

    Related image

    My Aunt Teresa died on Friday. It was the end of a short and sudden battle with an aggressive cancer. Not a bad way to go all things considered, as you hear of people fighting a painful, drawn-out cancer over a number of years, with multiple remissions and recurrences before it finally getting the better of them.

    However, the speed and abruptness of this (just over eight weeks from diagnosis to death) has hit members of my family hard. Her husband, my uncle, is heartbroken. My grandfather, who celebrated his 90th birthday in May, is especially devastated, having already lost another of his children to alcoholism about seven years ago. My mother and my other aunt, who are the eldest and have always been closer to each other than to their other siblings, are in shock.

    Well, what can I say? Ever since we got the news about the cancer, I have watched my family go to pieces in disbelief and shock, which has been quite alienating because I don’t feel the same way. I can’t say I was expecting the illness, and then the death, but equally it’s not as though these things are unheard of. Why shouldn’t it happen to someone we know?

    Over the years, I have spent a lot of time at Teresa’s house in the countryside near the coast. It is – or was – an ideal place to get away, as the house is big, and both my aunt and uncle liked their privacy so we only saw each other for an hour or two in the evening on some days. However, being well-educated they were interesting people to talk to. There is great hiking countryside around, so I could disappear all day doing that, or one of them would drive me into Eastbourne or Brighton so I could go hunting girls and/or guys with a wadge of their cash. She liked having me around as she had no children of her own and I could make her laugh.

    At about the five week mark of her illness, I visited Teresa in hospital to have what I expected – and turned out – to be our last conversation. I informed her that since she was dying, she might as well know I was a psychopath and didn’t love her, but that I had genuinely enjoyed my visits to her house and that I hoped she would consider leaving some money towards my future, the plans for which I divulged. She was all weak and drugged up so she didn’t say a great deal, but did tell me she loved me no matter what and had already written me into her will. I guess I’ll find out whether that’s true within a few weeks.

    A couple of days later, I went on a two-week holiday to Lanzarote and enjoyed myself immensely exploring the volcanoes, watching some rare birds, and eating seafood.

    I’d been home a week when Teresa’s husband phoned to tell us the news. That day I spent some time thinking about my aunt and what she had been to me, remembering the interesting conversations we had had and thinking it was a pity there wouldn’t be any more visits to her house now that she was dead. In other words, I mourned.

    The next day was Saturday, and I got on with my life. The sun was out and I had a book to read, and places to be that night. The phone calls from tearful relatives did somewhat test my patience, but overall it was a satisfactory weekend.

    The funeral is next Tuesday, but I need to be free for job interviews so am not going, and to be honest the job interviews are just an excuse because I’d rather attend my own funeral than bore myself at that emotional shit show. Should probably send flowers to make people think I mean well.

    At this point, I am seriously sick of the histrionic drama of my mother, grandfather, alive!aunt and all the rest of them, so am glad they will all be elsewhere for a couple of days. All this random crying and sullen silences is very dreary when you’re the only one feeling upbeat, and it’s all utterly pointless, because Teresa is gone and not coming back. I don’t believe in the afterlife, but maybe it really does exist and she’s been saved! More likely, she no longer exists and the fact that she’s dead matters not one jot to her because there is no “her”. Nothing.

    Now I know our brains are hardwired differently so they physically can’t react like me, but I honestly think it would be simpler for them if they could have just spent a couple of hours on Friday remembering/discussing the good times they had with Teresa, celebrating the life she had, and then paying someone to dispose of the corpse in a way that would be appropriate and that would give us all a good laugh – maybe donate it to the Wolf Conservation Trust (she loved those animals) or launch it with a trébuchet into the sea from the cliffs near her house. Alas.

    This blog post will, I hope, be the last time I give more than a second’s thought to my dead aunt, but I’m writing it specifically because French singing legend Charles Aznavour has also just died; they ran a 30 minute feature on the radio celebrating his life. It was brilliant – they summed up the sort of man he was, brought out Paul Gambaccini to recount the first time he met Aznavour, and played some of his biggest hits. It was short and to the point, giving those of us who knew of Aznavour a chance to feel sad he was gone and informing those who didn’t why they should care. Tomorrow, the news cycle will roll on, and that’s how things should be for all deaths, no matter who it is.

    In fact, since Monsieur Aznavour actually left behind some music that can still be enjoyed, perhaps he’ll be in my thoughts more often.

    Aunt Teresa, this is for you:

    Emmenez-Moi means “Take me away”. Off they go.

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    • nowve666 10:33 on October 3, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      It’s great that you are blogging again. This post is awesome! Ah! The voice of sanity! The way most people deal with death of someone close to them is a shame. I remember one Thanksgiving when I had cooked dinner and had Vicki’s sons and granddaughters over and we were having a lovely time. Then the phone rang with the news that the second wife of Vicki’s father had just died. Boom! The whole party was blown. Everyone had to go around with really sad looks on their faces. There’s a movie called “Devil Dog: The Hound of Hell” in which this family’s dog had been run over. It was the little girl’s birthday and the place was decorated for a party which the little girl cancelled. Her brother picked up some nuts from the table and she said, “Charlie! How can you eat at a time like this?” He apologized and said he wasn’t thinking. LOL!

      But, say, if you hate the histrionics of grief, you would love this movie, “Fatso.” It starts with a funeral and the hysterics would gag a hyena.

      ” I informed her that since she was dying, she might as well know I was a psychopath and didn’t love her, but that I had genuinely enjoyed my visits to her house and that I hoped she would consider leaving some money towards my future, the plans for which I divulged.”

      NO! YOU DIDN’T! I was in the dining room when I read that and I just started laughing. You really told her that? What chutzpah! And to ask for money too?

      I’m not at all sure the way the media deals with the death of celebrities is any better. They can get pretty stupid too. And the way people react to the news! I remember I was at work when the news came of Princess Diana’s death. These people who didn’t even know her went on and on.

      Liked by 1 person

    • nowve666 10:10 on October 4, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      People are always talking about how our brains make us “unable” to feel this or that or process information the way they do. That’s why I loved your saying, “Now I know our brains are hardwired differently so they physically can’t react like me…” LOL! Two-way street, after all. If we “can’t” react like them, they can’t react like us. I wonder how many readers picked up on that.

      Liked by 1 person

      • James 11:35 on October 4, 2018 Permalink | Reply

        All of them, now you’ve pointed it out.

        Like

    • Critter 07:53 on December 13, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Too bad you guys aren’t that into funerals, I’m sure you would approve of the rich traditions they have in other parts of the world like Tibet:

      “…All the eyewitness accounts remarked on the fact that the rogyapas did not perform their task with gravity or ceremony, but rather talked and laughed as during any other type of physical labor. According to Buddhist teaching, this makes it easier for the soul of the deceased to move on from the uncertain plane between life and death onto the next life…” https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sky_burial#Disassembling_the_body

      or maybe Persia https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tower_of_Silence

      In Bhutan they sure seem to have a sober approach to the topic:

      “…Rich people in the West, they have not touched dead bodies, fresh wounds, rotten things. This is a problem. This is the human condition. We have to be ready for the moment we cease to exist…”
      http://www.bbc.com/travel/story/20150408-bhutans-dark-secret-to-happiness

      Even when not taking the cultural aspect into account, then non-psychopathic people respond very differently to losing friends or relatives. Ever considered how useful funerals can be for reminding us “neuro-typicals” that everything in life is temporary, nature doesn’t favor the passive and that it’s a good time to start adapt a more productive attitude towards our brief existence?

      Like

  • James 15:50 on April 4, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: arguments, coming out, , family, , , , , , , , , step aside Mr Shakespeare, true story   

    Fessin' up 

    Pleased to meet you.

    Scene I: Friday evening, kitchen table

    JAMES’S FATHER (eyes narrowed): So, once again we find ourselves in this situation. For the fourth time, you’ve been lying to us.

    JAMES (in his head): Four times that you know of. (aloud) I don’t think it’s really been four times. What were the others?

    JAMES’S MOTHER outlines each of the three previous occasions. JAMES argues that at none of those times was he lying, and that this is a different situation. He wins 1 of 3 rounds.

    JAMES’S FATHER (exasperated): Three times, four times, what’s the fucking difference?! What matters is for the nth time, you have deliberately deceived us over months, and I don’t know why.

    JAMES: Neither do I.

    JAMES’S FATHER: No, that’s not going to fly anymore. You must know why you lie.

    JAMES (breathless) : It’s just an impulse. I don’t know why I do it. I can’t stop myself.

    JAMES’S FATHER: Don’t give us all this “it’s just an impulse” bullshit. You made a choice to lie each time you spoke to us and you did it comfortably.

    JAMES (internally admiring his father’s shrewdness): No! I didn’t do it on purpose-

    JAMES’S FATHER (cutting James off): You knowingly and comfortably lied to us over months. You deliberately hurt us.

    JAMES (truthfully): I did not lie to hurt you. (in head) I lied to benefit me. You didn’t come into the equation.

    JAMES’S FATHER (shouting): You lied knowing you would hurt us. You deliberately hurt us.

    JAMES (shouting back): NO! I didn’t lie to hurt you! I mean, I knew the consequences if you found out, but you weren’t supposed to find out.

    JAMES’S MOTHER: You may not have set out to hurt us, but that’s the result.

    JAMES (flatly): Yes.

    JAMES’S FATHER: So come on, why did you do it? I want an explanation.

    JAMES (long silence): I don’t know what to say. (another long silence) I have nothing to say.

    JAMES’S FATHER: Do you know right from wrong?

    JAMES (quickly) Yes. (pause) I mean I think I do. Who knows at this point? I don’t know. I feel bad for hurting you, if that’s the same thing.

    JAMES’S FATHER: Then why did you lie

    JAMES shrugs, but says nothing. After a whole minute:

    JAMES’S FATHER: Well I’m not going to sit here while you say nothing. If that’s the best explanation you can give, I guess we’ll have to take it. But I don’t know how we can trust you ever again, knowing how easily and convincingly you lie. We want to trust you, but there’ll always be a niggling doubt in the back of our minds. I want to believe you.

    JAMES (deciding now is not the time to make an ‘X Files’ joke): Yes, okay.

    JAMES’S MOTHER bursts into tears and runs from the room. JAMES looks at his father impassively.

    JAMES’S FATHER: You should go after your mother.

    JAMES: I don’t know what to say.

    JAMES’S FATHER (shouting again): How about telling her you’re sorry you hurt her?

    Exeunt

    Scene II: Monday lunchtime. JAMES’S MOTHER’S garden, where she has been chatting to her son and sitting on a bench

    JAMES’S MOTHER: I know you won’t like this, but I have to ask anyway. All those times you were telling me how useless [person] was and how she was so disorganised and feckless, that was all made up, wasn’t it?

    JAMES: Yeah, it was.

    JAMES’S MOTHER (gobsmacked): You had me stressed out and really hating that woman for putting you through so much, but it was all just fabricated.

    JAMES (half-smile): Well I was just describing myself, wasn’t I? I was the disorganised one, so I was just using her as a scapegoat.

    They sit in silence for a few moments. Then, JAMES’S MOTHER asks why JAMES told a lie a certain way, when he had told similar lies in a consistent, but different way.

    JAMES’S MOTHER: Why didn’t you just follow the same pattern?

    JAMES (genuinely stumped): Hmm, I don’t know. Maybe for variety? But it was back in December, so I’m really not sure. Interesting question.

    JAMES’S MOTHER (still disgruntled, but with a note of pride): You put a lot of detail into your lies, don’t you? A lot of unnecessary stuff, but you get really committed to the story, I’ll give you that.

    JAMES: Um, thanks, Mum.

    They smile at each other genuinely

     
    • nowve666 18:41 on April 4, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      “Pleased to meet you.” Where you been? I can show you incredible things.
      They sit in silence for a few moments. Then, JAMES’S MOTHER asks why JAMES told a lie a certain way, when he had told similar lies in a consistent, but different way.

      JAMES’S MOTHER: Why didn’t you just follow the same pattern?”
      Criminal versatility?

      Like

      • James 05:45 on April 5, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        Nvm, I found it.

        Like

        • nowve666 09:28 on April 5, 2017 Permalink | Reply

          I just copied it, selecting the text and Ctrl-C. The text of your blog has italics in it which I guess you put there by selecting the Italic icon in the editor or by just doing Ctrl-I.

          Like

    • nowve666 21:14 on April 4, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Hey! Do your parents know you’re a psychopath?

      Like

    • Amaterasu Solar 23:09 on April 4, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Interestingly, I find that I like You a lot, James. Would trust You as far as I could throw You…which, as an old, arthritic lady, is nil. But I like You.

      Liked by 1 person

      • James 04:28 on April 5, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        Lol that is funny.

        Liked by 1 person

      • James 05:43 on April 5, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        Most people who know me, like me. What I lack in trustworthiness, I make up for with personality 😉

        Liked by 1 person

        • Amaterasu Solar 21:36 on April 5, 2017 Permalink | Reply

          Serves You well, no doubt. [smile]

          Liked by 1 person

          • James 08:33 on April 6, 2017 Permalink | Reply

            What do you like about me? 🙂

            Liked by 1 person

            • Amaterasu Solar 09:08 on April 6, 2017 Permalink | Reply

              i like Your willingness to “fess up” (presuming it’s a true account, which I think it likely is). I like Your intellect and Your way of Self examination. I like that You do not resort to ad hominem (as witnessed in a previous exchange with anOther). I like the debonair quality You exude. I suspect that You would be fun to spend time with, provided One does not take anything You might say to heart. [smile]

              Liked by 1 person

              • James 07:45 on April 8, 2017 Permalink | Reply

                Thank you, that comment seems sincere, and altogether too charitable. You’re not half bad yourself 🙂

                The exact script is almost certainly wrong, such is the atrocious state of human memory, but the gist of the exchanges is all true.

                Liked by 1 person

      • James 11:28 on October 5, 2018 Permalink | Reply

        Oh, fuck me. This is still so funny 😀 You still alive?

        Liked by 1 person

  • Amaterasu Solar 12:32 on April 8, 2017 Permalink | Reply

    I surely did not expect a verbatim recounting. I figured it was a general portrayal. [smile] Indeed, I always express from the heart, and I meant every word I said. “Charitable?” Not at all. It is what I pick up from You. And thanks. For a conspiracy analysis, I guess I do ok, eh? [grin]

    Like

  • GeneticPsychosMom (Tina) 11:13 on April 13, 2017 Permalink | Reply

    Thank you for this from the bottom of my heart. Thank you for all you have contributed. I am truly sorry that I have neglected you in this regard.

    Liked by 2 people

  • bloodyfuckingdiatribe 14:32 on June 2, 2017 Permalink | Reply

    “Life of James: A Heart-Worming Tale”

    Liked by 2 people

  • GeneticPsychosMom (Tina) 11:41 on May 20, 2015 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , , , , failure, family, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , success   

    What makes a successful psychopath? 

    James Renard manipulation quote

    This discussion came about because, in one of his comments on Meet the Parents of a Psychopath, James said,

    “…childhood is no doubt a critical phase in anyone’s life, so it stands to reason a properly-guided psychopath will be more successful and less destructive later in life.”

    Tina: I need this clarified, James. What do you consider to be a successful psychopath? All of the psychopaths I know, (over 20), are destructive, but in different ways. My definition of success does not allow for the scheming manipulation tactics being perpetrated on unsuspecting victims. The resulting devastation stays hidden. So, I am of the mind that psychopaths can’t really be termed successful by societal standards. What is your view of a successful psychopath?

     

    James: OK, well first of all I should note that I don’t agree that the tactics a person decides to use can have any bearing on how successful they are deemed. Let’s take CEOs of major corporations as a group. Some of them will have used manipulative or underhand tactics to get to where they are now. But these individuals are no less successful than their more honest peers, indeed they may be more successful. You can say that you don’t believe it is morally right for individuals to manipulate their way to the top but that is not the same thing as saying these people are not successful; any CEO of a major corporation is clearly very successful.

    James log assault quoteNow that’s been cleared up, I can answer your question. My conception of a successful psychopath is one who is able to adequately function in society. He or she has or is working toward a productive career with a decent salary, he is able to fulfil his physical, sexual and emotional needs, she does not behave in a way that will get her incarcerated. Unsuccessful psychopaths live on the margins of society, unable to control their behaviour or to fit in, or are currently behind bars for long periods of time. Successful psychopaths live within society, benefit from it and provide it with benefits. Some of them, as we know, get to shape and change their society due to the position they have attained within it. This is my definition of the most successful psychopaths.

    Just to clarify things further, you have said quite clearly what your definition of success does not include, and I have explained my opposition to that particular view, but would you mind giving a definition of what does constitute success in your mind?

    Tina: I am one of those hippies that does not admire people simply because they are titled in any regard, whether that be a CEO or some kind of royalty. A person is successful by achieving a goal by their own work, on their own merit, and they are not successful when they get something through inheritance, secret manipulations, or abuse. I look down on deceivers, even more so than I look down on people who do not try. At least people who do not try are not causing pain. There needs to be another word besides “success” that defines a person who steps on another to achieve their appearance of phony success. Maybe Phuccessful.

    Ok, returning to psychopaths…

    What you have described as a successful psychopath is just a regular member of society. Apparently the psychopathy makes success in that regard a constant struggle. For a psychopath, it takes a concerted effort to just be a member of society?

    I agree with you on that point, but the underlying aggravant to me is that the so-called successful psychopaths of today are merely successful at hiding their psychopathy. They are taking advantage of people’s ignorance by pretending to be of the same mindset. To be truly successful, in my opinion, would be to go forward into the world with your psychopathy well-known, and actually be a regular member of society, not a pretender. For example, Sam Vaknin and James Fallon have found ways to be successful. I am not talking about the fame, but rather the fact that they must forever more interact with other people without the secrecy.

    James: Sorry, not letting that first point go just yet! I agree completely people who inherit titles or privileges are not benefiting from their own success. But I have to disagree with you that manipulators are not deserving of their success. It is after all, in your own words, “by their own work and on their own merit”. If one of my skills happens to be that I am good at manipulation, that skill can contribute to my success regardless of how your morals sit with it. Success is not defined as being admired by Tina Taylor. Success is having (enough) happiness, fulfilment, wealth, power or status (to satisfy yourself). (I say ‘or’ because different things attract different people. I am not too concerned about either wealth or status but I sure do covet the other three).

    So, back to psychopaths…

    Yes, we are in agreement here. If a psychopath can lead an ordinary (or an extraordinary) life without being imprisoned, then he or she is successful, in my books at least. However, in order to do that we are unfortunately obligated by society to remain hidden. The way I naturally would like to behave and the things I would truthfully like to say do not reflect society’s expectation of me and would result at best in my exclusion and at worst in my incarceration.

    Bob Dylan success quote

    Nah, scratch that. The worst case scenario is that I would be murdered at the hands of an angry mob of normals. The way to be a “regular member of society” is not in my case total honesty, it is to lie and pretend. If I was being completely myself right now, I would be writing more or less the same thing, but it would resemble the word soup of my ‘stream of thought’ post and there would be a lot more expletives; I would be typing every insult to you that is running through my head as they occur to me. But, you wouldn’t like that. It would spoil the working relationship we have. And it would not be in keeping with the spirit of a reasoned debate. In the same way, if I was entirely honest in my every action and sentence, I would be a long way out of what society deems acceptable. For society, lying is not the problem, it’s everything else. My dishonesty is as much for society’s benefit as it is my own. Do you understand?

    With regard to your specific examples, Sam Vaknin is not publicly a psychopath. The filmmaker of I, Psychopath  [Ian Walker] clearly thinks he is, and the way the film depicts him we’re left in little doubt that he is one, but Vaknin himself does not claim the title. In his own words, he is a ‘malignant narcissist’, which as we know means more or less the same thing as ‘psychopath’, but in the eyes of the public there is a difference. The film also shows that despite people knowing he’s a narcissist or psychopath or even both, he still controls his long-term partner’s every thought and still plays manipulative games with the filmmaker. Your idea that the games would stop if only psychopaths could admit what they are is a fantasy. Look at the film, Vaknin says “I am a narcissist” into the camera, gets diagnosed with ASPD on camera, and talks about his condition with the filmmaker, but still charms, bullies and manipulates him whenever he can.

    Then we’ve got James Fallon (Jim Fallon? Jimmy Fallon? That would be a turn up for the books…). He was already a well-known and well-respected neurobiologist (or whatever he is) before he ‘discovered’ he was a psychopath. And, like Vaknin, he subsequently made a career on the back of his discovery plus the fact that he has the expertise to (claim) to be making a difference to people’s lives and contributing to the total sum of knowledge of the condition.

    I do not have that luxury. Neither does almost every other psychopath. My academic specialisms are philosophy and the French language. Can I use my psychopathy to be better in these fields? Certainly. Would my public declaration that I am a psychopath help my career, or would it in fact destroy it before it has even properly begun? Vaknin can say “I am a narcissist, but don’t worry because I am actually using my personal insight into my condition to be one of the leading voices on… what topic again?? Ah yes, narcissism!” Fallon can say “I am a psychopath, but don’t worry because I am actually using my personal insight into the condition to improve my chosen field of work which oops! just happens to be the study of psychopathic brains!” Contrast with my situation, as an example for the situation of most psychopaths. I cannot say “I am a psychopath, but don’t worry because I am using my personal insight into the condition to translate this French legal document into English for you.” So my success does not just benefit from dishonesty, it depends on it.

    If that isn’t enough to be sinking your teeth into for now, let me raise a further point which could perhaps determine where this conversation goes next. I am not completely defeatist. I am not arguing that just because it is currently nigh on impossible for psychopaths to live openly, it will always be so. It’s a societal issue like any others. If attitudes change, if people are educated, it could happen.

    As a side note, have you ever considered the increasingly psychopathic nature of society that you have noted is part of that change in attitude?

    Arne Tiselius quote

    Tina: I have noted the lack of empathy in society, but I don’t think it is increasing. I think people in general are the same as always – oblivious and aloof, except for caring about their community circle of friends and family. I saw a poll that says 45% of people support the drone bombing of other countries to fight ISIS. Would those same people support the bombing of their neighbors because the Charles Manson cult was suspected of hiding in the neighborhood? People can be very shitty when it comes to “outsiders”.

    I do happen to think that the number of psychopathic leaders are increasing. I think that the number of psychopathic ideas being forced upon us by mass media is increasing – and that has a lot to do with the psychopaths who own the media.

    It is not morals, nor a sense of fairness, nor envy that have me anti-manipulation. Stomping on manipulators is survival instinct. People want to eliminate psychopaths, not because it is the moral thing to do, but because the manipulation is life-threatening. Since phuccess is dependent on threats, it is not just Tina Taylor who disagrees. You don’t even like manipulation, nor threats, yourself.

    James: So I’m concerned that we’re getting seriously off-topic here, that is to say no longer discussing how psychopaths can be successful in society. Perhaps that is my fault for posing the question I did at the end, but all the same none of what you just wrote is a response to (or even an acknowledgement of) what I said about psychopaths needing to lie to stay hidden. Instead we’ve gone all violent, talking about “eliminating psychopaths”, “stomping on manipulators” and using a made-up word with dubious connotations.

    I am intrigued by what you mean when you say “(I) don’t even like manipulation, nor threats, yourself”, but other than that I have nothing further to add until we’re back on track.

    Tina: I already gave my opinion on psychopaths remaining hidden. It is what psychopaths are successful doing. It is what psychopaths will try to continue doing, because that is the crux of your success. If I was in your boat, I would not want to stop hiding, either.

    In your own words,

    ” I would be writing more or less the same thing, but it would resemble the word soup of my ‘stream of thought’ post and there would be a lot more expletives; I would be typing every insult to you that is running through my head as they occur to me. But, you wouldn’t like that.”

    Nobody likes that, whether they are psychopaths or not. You are trying to control yourself, however I feel free to express myself as I am. I believe that you have a skewed interpretation of the world – thinking that society is holding you back, when it is really coming from yourself. I, myself, am free to write things “talking about “eliminating psychopaths”, “stomping on manipulators” and using a made-up word with dubious connotations.” Should I stop? Why? Because you don’t like it? Because society doesn’t like it? Note how you are the one trying to be “proper”. Why is that?

    Let’s go to the childhood upbringing. Successful psychopaths learn to hide their lack of empathy and conscience from an early age. What develops after that? Holding yourself to an extreme form of controlled behavior and blaming it on society?

    James:  “I already gave my opinion on psychopaths remaining hidden.” Yes, in a private exchange. Not in this discussion, which is supposed to be made public at the end of all this.

    Alright, we’re back on track, though I note a change in your tone that means I’ve irritated you somewhat. It’s fine, you’ll probably deny it in your next reply, but I know it’s there. I digress.

    “Nobody likes that, whether they are psychopaths or not.” – Well that was my point, people wouldn’t like the completely honest version of me. But let me clarify something. I don’t think society is holding me back, I’m still going to be successful, with or without a ‘coming out party’. Yes there are certain limits on my behaviour, just as there are different limits on yours, but I can live with that. And I don’t blame society for the way it is; even so I can wish it to be different.

    “What develops after that?” Simple, we learn how to mimic other people’s behaviour and to appeal to their needs and desires. Yes, this is  necessary for ‘social survival’. No, I don’t especially like it. But I have benefited from it enormously. A turning point for me was when I worked out how to make people laugh. Intentionally and consistently I mean. Of course I’d done it before, but it was always hit-and-miss and often unintentional. And that didn’t come until surprisingly late, I was probably 15 or 16. So afterwards, once I could have people in stitches on a whim, the other things like charm and social grace and all that bullshit slotted into place. There is no better way to dehumanise someone than by realising you can control their thoughts and feelings through words alone.

    It would be natural for me to end on a question to pose you. Since I don’t have one, perhaps we are nearing the end of this discussion? I’ll let you have the last word on the matter, that is if you yourself have no further questions.

    Tina: I really don’t feel irritation. I am just blunt and succinct by nature. In fact, my father (a phuccessful psychopath) was the one who was irritated with me at age 13 when he said, “You are too truthful.” Many people don’t like the way that I talk because it “hurts feelings.” The truth hurts. That is not something that you, nor anyone else, has any influence on. It is all me, I am unique, and I like it.

    (It is odd that psychopaths don’t latch onto that fact, – if you want to hurt someone, just tell them the truth. I don’t like to hurt people. So, why don’t I curb myself and lie more? I like to be myself more than I like to please others’ sensibilities.)

    So, your view is that people wouldn’t like the completely honest version of you. The honest version of you enjoys dehumanising people. You would not be able to dehumanise people if they knew that was your intention. In private, you told me some things that reveals that you have caused grievous emotional harm to other humans. Unsuccessful psychopaths are not liked because everyone can see their antisocial side. My conclusion, therefore, is that your success at being secretly antisocial depends on your acting ability.

    Were you even tempted to go run amok and leave an undeniable path of violent destruction? Is there a point in time of your childhood when you made a conscious decision to care about your life direction? What is your ultimate motivation to be successful by your definition? (I was going to ask you why some psychopaths don’t concern themselves with being liked, but antisocial behavior is not a domain of psychopaths only.)

    Bruce Hood self-control quote

     James:

    “(It is odd that psychopaths don’t latch onto that fact, – if you want to hurt someone, just tell them the truth.)”

    Yes, and the ugly truth hurts even more when it follows a series of beautiful lies. Just remember that, if you ever change your mind about hurting people.
    “The honest version of you enjoys dehumanising people”. Nah, I didn’t say that. The “dehumanising” line (“There is no better way to dehumanise someone than by realising you can control their thoughts and feelings through words alone.”) refers to how people can be dehumanised in your head, i.e. they become less than human in your eyes. It’s not something that actually happens to someone else. Sorry that wasn’t clear before, I was touch and go on the wording of that particular sentence and it looks like I got it wrong.

    “In private, you told me some things that reveals that you have caused grievous emotional harm to other humans.” Did I? What was that then? You can publish me word-for-word, if you can find the text.

    Your conclusion is on the mark, however. I am still tempted to this day, Tina, but I have committed to living life free and happy so I restrain myself. Actually the time I decided was just before I learned how to make people laugh, in fact it was the catalyst for that discovery. When I realised the negative consequences my poor behaviour was having on my well-being (namely, people were starting to hate me for being a ‘creep’, frightened of the physical pain I enjoyed causing, among other things), I turned things around.

    “What is your ultimate motivation to be successful by your definition?” What does that mean? Are you missing some punctuation or is it just poorly written altogether?”

    (I was going to ask you why some psychopaths don’t concern themselves with being liked, but antisocial behavior is not a domain of psychopaths only.)” Very true, it is not. As for what I’d have said, I couldn’t care less what other psychopaths concern themselves with; that’s not my business.

    Tina:  That was a poorly written question, but you got the gist of it. It was answered by your commitment to living free and happy.

    In some of our email exchanges, you had revealed the grievous harm of changing someone’s life path for the worse.

    (You had written, “Just a shame the ladies on LoveFraud can’t do the same as you; get over it and stop being bitter that you lost years after the fact.”)

    I replied: “It took me 10 years to get to this point and I will never “get over it”, so I can’t fault the people who are suffering endlessly. The consequences of loving a psychopath are forever. Every facet of my life was adversely affected. I had big plans. I had goals. I had dreams. I had hopes. I thought I was making progress in life, only to discover an all-encompassing scam. People like me (neurotypical) have an identity that is firm we don’t have the luxury that you do to change on a whim. My life decisions, very important directions I was taking in my life, were based on false information. It all could have been avoided. There was absolutely NO REASON for the trickery. It’s not just a few lies, it’s a whole illusion. My identity was flushed down the toilet and the man is lucky to be alive.”

     

    And your response: Big Bad Wolf and Little Red Riding Hood photoOK, point taken, it’s hard work to recover. That would explain why my last one dropped out of her degree in our excellent university.”

     

     

    Formerly titled ” Phuccessful Psychopaths (Who are they?)”

    Peter Pan and Captain Hook Photo courtesy gavinodd’s Bucket

    Little Red Riding Hood and Big Bad Wolf photo courtesy of PsychopathsandLove

     

     

    Psychopath TEST Politicians

     
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