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  • GeneticPsychosMom (Tina) 10:45 on October 3, 2016 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , organizations, , , ,   

    10 Ways Manipulators Use Emotional Intelligence for Evil 

    evil grin

    Emotional intelligence is nothing new.

    Sure, the term was coined in the 1960s, and popularized by psychologists in recent decades. But the concept of emotional intelligence–which I define as a person’s ability to recognize and understand emotions and use that information to guide decision making–has been around as long as we have.

    This skill we refer to as emotional intelligence (also known as EI or EQ) is like any other ability: You can cultivate it, work to enhance it, sharpen it.

    And it’s important to know that, just like other skills, emotional intelligence can be used both ethically and unethically.

    The dark side of emotional intelligence

    Organizational psychologist and best-selling author Adam Grant identified EI at its worst in his essay for The Atlantic, “The Dark Side of Emotional Intelligence“:

    Recognizing the power of emotions…one of the most influential leaders of the 20th century spent years studying the emotional effects of his body language. Practicing his hand gestures and analyzing images of his movements allowed him to become “an absolutely spellbinding public speaker,” says the historian Roger Moorhouse–“it was something he worked very hard on.”

    His name was Adolf Hitler.

    The last thing anyone wants is to be manipulated, whether it’s by politicians, colleagues, or even those who claim to be our friends.

    Below, I’ve listed 10 ways emotional intelligence can be used against you. Of course, these actions and characteristics don’t always identify a lack of ethics; a person may practice them unintentionally. Nonetheless, increasing awareness of these behaviors will equip you to deal with them strategically, and sharpen your own EQ in the process.

    1. They play on fear.

    A manipulator will exaggerate facts and overemphasize specific points in an effort to scare you into action.

    Strategy: Beware of statements that imply you lack courage or attempts to instill a fear of missing out. Make sure you have the whole picture of a situation before taking action.

    2. They deceive.

    All of us value transparency and honesty, but manipulators hide the truth or try to show you only one side of the story. For example, consider the manager or employee who purposefully spreads unconfirmed rumors and gossip to gain a strategic advantage.

    Strategy: Don’t believe everything you hear. Rather, base your decisions on reputable sources and ask questions when details aren’t clear.

    3. They take advantage when you’re happy.

    Often, we’re tempted to say yes to anything when we’re in an especially good mood, or jump on opportunities that look really good at the time (but that we haven’t really thought through). Manipulators know how to take advantage of those moods.

    Strategy: Work to increase awareness of your positive emotions just as much as your negative emotions. When it comes to making decisions, strive to achieve balance.

    4. They take advantage of reciprocity.

    Manipulators know it’s harder to say no if they do something for you–so they may attempt to flatter, butter you up, or say yes to small favors…and then ask you for big ones.

    Strategy: For sure, giving brings more joy than receiving.

    But it’s also important to know your limitations. And don’t be afraid to say no when appropriate.

    5. They push for home-court advantage.

    “A manipulative individual may insist on you meeting and interacting in a physical space where he or she can exercise more dominance and control,” says Preston Ni, author of How to Successfully Handle Manipulative People.

    These people may push to negotiate in a space where they feel ownership and familiarity, like their office, home, or any other place you might feel less comfortable.

    Strategy: If you need to negotiate, offer to do so in a neutral space. If you must meet the person on his or her home turf, ask for a drink of water and engage in small talk upon arrival, to help you get your bearings.

    6. They ask lots of questions.

    It’s easy to talk about ourselves. Manipulators know this, and they take advantage by asking probing questions with a hidden agenda–discovering hidden weaknesses or information they can use to their advantage.

    Strategy: Of course, you shouldn’t assume wrong motives in everyone who wants to get to know you better. But beware of those who only ask questions–while refusing to reveal the same information about themselves.

    7. They speak quickly.

    At times, manipulators will speak at a faster pace or use special vocabulary and jargon in an attempt to gain advantage.

    Strategy: Don’t be afraid to ask people to repeat their point, or to ask questions for clarity. You can also repeat their point in your words, or ask them to name an example–allowing you to regain control of the conversation.

    8. They display negative emotion.

    Some people purposefully raise their voice or use strong body language to show they’re upset, in an effort to manipulate your emotions. (Basketball coaches are masters at this.)

    Strategy: Practice the pause. If someone demonstrates strong emotion, take a moment before reacting. In some instances, you may even walk away for a few minutes.

    9. They give you an extremely limited time to act.

    An individual may try and force you to make a decision within a very unreasonable amount of time. In doing so, he or she wants to coerce you into a decision before you have time to weigh the consequences.

    Strategy: Don’t submit to unreasonable demands. If your partner refuses to give you more time, you’re better off looking for what you need somewhere else.

    10. They give you the silent treatment.

    “By deliberately not responding to your reasonable calls, text messages, emails, or other inquiries, the manipulator presumes power by making you wait, and intends to place doubt and uncertainty in your mind,” says Ni. “The silent treatment is a head game, where silence is used as a form of leverage.”

    Strategy: After you’ve attempted communication to a reasonable degree, give your partner a deadline. In situations where alternatives are unavailable, a frank discussion addressing his or her communication style may be necessary.

    Putting it into practice

    There will always be those who work to increase their emotional awareness–in both themselves and others. Sometimes, they’ll use that power for manipulative influence.

    And that’s exactly why you should sharpen your own emotional intelligence–to protect yourself when they do.

    (If you’d like more tips on how to make your emotions work for you, instead of against you, make sure to sign up for my free monthly newsletter.)

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  • GeneticPsychosMom (Tina) 09:04 on September 16, 2016 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , , , organizations   

    Green Criminal Activity 

    trash dumping

    Crime statistics often present a distorted view of crime because they fail to include the large volume and scope of crime and harm that ecological disorganization produces. In short, green criminologists often reference this harm in comparison to traditional ‘street’ crimes that the state records for statistical purposes for crimes such as murder, rape, robbery, assault, larceny and motor vehicle theft. Green crimes easily surpass the volume and number of victims reported in crime statistics that are kept by the state. There are a wide variety of green crimes, and the victims of green crimes include non-traditional victims whom criminologists do not ordinarily examine. In addition to human victims, green crimes also have non-human victims including animals, plants, and ecosystems. Green crimes do not outnumber the crimes reported by the police such as murder, rape, assault, larceny, burglary and motor vehicle theft simply because there are more categories of victims. For instance, green-harms often victimize larger numbers of human victims in a single incident compared with typical street crimes.

    A single green crime may produce hundreds, thousands or even millions of human victims. Some of those victims suffer repeated victimization as green crimes can also unfold over long periods of time and have a duration not typically associated with street crimes. Each of these factors increases the scope, intensity, and numbers of green victimizations, making these forms of victimization quite different from the typical street crime victimization incident. Green harm and crime are important conceptually and theoretically as well because they have the ability to cause forms of ecological damage that change the very nature of the world.

    These green harms can also make the world uninhabitable. Abandoned towns and communities exist because of the health hazards posed by toxic pollutants and other related environmental disasters that are counted among green crimes. In the United States, for example, these locations include: Times Beach, Missouri (due to dioxin pollution); Centralia, Pennsylvania (due to underground mining fires); Love Canal, Niagara Falls, NY (due to widespread disposal of toxic waste); Pitcher, Oklahoma (due to concentrations of lead and zinc pollution); Treece, Kansas (due to lead pollution). These cities, and others around the world, stand as monuments to the tremendous harms green crimes can produce. In addition to these abandoned cities, there are currently 1,163 Superfund sites that are portions of cities, towns, and communities in the United States listed as containing sufficient levels of ground pollution to require remediation.

    The environmental impacts of the international capitalist economy include escalated carbon dioxide pollution and other hazardous pollutants. As some researchers note, corporations fail to consider how their behaviours impact ecological disorganization because they externalize the costs of ecological harms—ecological problems that are produced by corporations become social problems which the government, rather than the private firms that create those problems, must address. This shifts the expense of anti-environmental practices to the state, which must tax citizens to generate the funds for remedies. Corporations benefit from the combination of weak environmental regulations and a pseudo-free market which enables the corporations to externalize costs to the state. This, in turn, facilitates private-sector accumulation by transferring corporate costs to individual tax-payers.

    Exerpts from “IS IT A CRIME TO PRODUCE ECOLOGICAL DISORGANIZATION?” by Michael J. Lynch, Michael A. Long, Kimberly L. Barrett and Paul B. Stretesky. BRIT. J. CRIMINOL. (2013) 53, 997–1016

    Photo courtesy CoastalCare.org

     

    Psychopath TEST Politicians

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    • nowve666 10:26 on September 16, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      I wouldn’t call this “green crime.” Civil disobedience in protest of pollution such as the activists who are trying to stop the pipelines through Native American lands or the disgusting desecration of our marine life committed by BP can be called a green “crime.” Harming the ecology isn’t “green.” I’m not trying to be a word-nazi. But this terminology confused me until I read the whole article.

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    • Narcissism alert 00:42 on September 27, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      It is a green crime because it desecrates God’s green earth. It is another example of how laws have to be toughened in every arena to stop sociopaths from befouling everything sacred and important to the livelihood and sustainability of others. If not, they always game the system.

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  • GeneticPsychosMom (Tina) 09:45 on September 14, 2016 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , corporate psychopathy, , , organizations, ,   

    Psychopathic Corporate Ideology 

    Take the money and run

    Social Darwinism views self-interest and competition as values to be placed above all others: injustice and inequality are justified as the strong (the richest, in corporate theology) rise to the top, and the weak do not deserve compassion, they deserve what they get. Social Darwinistic values and thought, spearheaded by corporate America, are deeply ingrained at this point in history in the United States, and the spread of this vicious belief system is what is benignly referred to as “globalization.”

    International legal scholar Joel Bakan has expanded the discussion of corporate institutional power to specifically address the “psychopathic” characteristics of the drive for corporate profit. These institutional qualities are very similar to those characterizing individual psychopaths, indicating tendencies toward irresponsibility, lack of empathy and antisocial behavior, manipulation, grandiosity, a refusal to accept responsibility, lack of empathy and antisocial behavior, manipulation, grandiosity, a refusal to accept responsibility for their own actions, and an inability to feel remorse. They are basically publicly and socially irresponsible in their need to realize the corporate goal, shareholder profit, and the externalization of social and environmental costs, thus putting others at the risk of great harm.

    Perhaps the most dangerous personality characteristic of this institutional psychopath is the overwhelming motivation to represent itself as caring, compassionate, and socially responsible. Bakan draws a parallel between the human psychopath’s penchant to use charm to mask his or her own narcissistic self-absorbed behavior and that of the corporate institution. Public relations thus becomes the primary directive of the corporate sociopath, to carefully present itself to the public as a caring and compassionate “person,” at once concerned with social and environmental responsibility. This presentation to the public, however, is designed to hide its own selfish motivations, the externalization of social and environmental costs onto an unsuspecting public. This public relations machine, relentless in its drive to charm the public, essentially displays sociopathic qualities, for the sociopath functions quite well in society and superficially appears quite caring and compassionate. Nevertheless, the charm masks an inherent disdain for ethical and moral concerns, norms, and rules.

    Excerpt from the book, “Oil, Globalization, and the War for the Arctic Refuge“, Chapter “Neoconservative Corporate Theology”, by David M. Standlea

    Photo Courtesy geralt on pixabay

     

    Psychopath TEST Politicians

     
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