Tagged: politics Toggle Comment Threads | Keyboard Shortcuts

  • GeneticPsychosMom (Tina) 22:54 on December 11, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , , pathocracy, , politics   

    Kakistocracy: “Government by the worst people.” 

    If we were watching a satirical TV series in which the President of the USA re-tweeted deeply offensive messages without checking their veracity or source, the ability to switch off the screen or choose a different programme might make the events seem like a poorly written script. Because the show would have been poking fun at the so called leader of the free world in an extremely far-fetched manner, some of us might enjoy the programme despite its absurdity. If the programme gained enough popularity, the real life President might even be asked if he had ever been tempted to tweet something outrageous and no doubt the real President would turn that into a joke and move on to the much more important issues such as how to deal with poverty and healthcare, how to ensure that all US citizens feel equal despite the colour of the skin or their gender and how to deal with matters across the rest of the free world.

    The fact that this is not satire and Trump has chosen to defend himself by suggesting he is not the problem and has called on his press team to claim the real problem is the rest of the world shows just how weird life has become. This is particularly disturbing when in real life, men and women in various positions have lost their jobs for the unprofessional use of social media. Meanwhile back in the UK the recently resigned Secretary of State for International Development has just proposed improving our prospects of a clean Brexit by telling the rest of the EU to “sod off”. This sort of language in public from a leader in virtually any other profession would at the very least bring a reprimand to the person concerned, however the voters in Witham are in no position to challenge Ms Patels words, even though she is paid to represent them. Elsewhere in our country a previous leader of the Conservative Party who was Home Secretary for 4 years and is qualified as a QC has just had a conviction quashed for failing to complete a form correctly, even though he did not fill it out as he should. While he did not design the form himself, it is one of the documents that his old department were responsible for creating. The numbers of people who have been denied justice or benefits because they have failed to complete badly designed forms properly, runs into tens of thousands. Their position in life and wealth however mean that unlike Michael Howard, most simply had to take such matters on the chin.

    The truth is that the behaviour of a select group of our political leaders has reached a level that is so low, it is hard to imagine that things could get any worse. A recent analysis of the House of Lords identified around 90 Peers who had voted or asked questions less than 5 times in the year, yet between them had claimed over £500,000, so along with the privilege of being a member of the upper House they have each benefited from an average of £6,000 of public money for their attendance and other expenses. Along with the examples above there are numerous cases such as those of Boris Johnson, Michael Fallon, Damien Green etc who have brought their previously high office into disrepute. Yet behind these people or perhaps above them, there are many MPs, Peers, Councillors and MEPs whose hard work on our account barely gets a mention on TV or in the newspapers. It seems as though we need some way of truly holding our representatives to account and rewarding those who distinguish themselves by working hard in their roles. One person whose name comes to my mind is Frank Field who was elected in 1979 so he has been an MP for 38 years which is a huge length of time. Although I have disagreed with him on many occasions, he has achieved a huge amount of good. The same could be said for the current group of MPs in our City who between them have served a mere 10 years as MPs but all seem to work hard for our city. At a more local level, Tracey Hill is an extremely hard working Councillor in my ward and peers such as Tanni Grey-Thompson and Janet Whitaker do a stirling job on the red benches. They are of course not alone and many others could be listed. It seems that we need to find a way of applauding their hard work, just as we need a way of dismissing those who take unreasonable advantage of their position in our nation and bring the roles into disrepute.

    ianchisnall

    TrumpIf we were watching a satirical TV series in which the President of the USA re-tweeted deeply offensive messages without checking their veracity or source, the ability to switch off the screen or choose a different programme might make the events seem like a poorly written script. Because the show would have been poking fun at the so called leader of the free world in an extremely far-fetched manner, some of us might enjoy the programme despite its absurdity. If the programme gained enough popularity, the real life President might even be asked if he had ever been tempted to tweet something outrageous and no doubt the real President would turn that into a joke and move on to the much more important issues such as how to deal with poverty and healthcare, how to ensure that all US citizens feel equal despite the colour of the skin or their…

    View original post 636 more words

     
  • James 17:00 on November 13, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , drones, enemies of the people, , , , , , Jewishness, , muslims, , , politics, racism, robots, slaughterbots, ,   

    Slaughterbots 

    Some exciting tech news!

    Pretty wonderful, eh? Never mind all the exterminated terrorists, just think of all the defectives we could get rid of with a team of beautiful drones, using facial recognition software and a smart analysis of the data trails everyone leaves behind.

    Self-confessed psychopaths for instance; all those pricks with blogs and quora accounts and Facebook groups who have outed themselves online. Find their IP address, discover their real social media account, learn their name, what they look like and where they live, then send out the drones. Boom! If they have any children, chances are they also carry the evil gene, so it would be prudent to kill them too. Callous unemotional? Oppositional defiant? Conduct disorder? Boom! Now they’re all dead.

    Why stop there? Send the tracking bots onto websites where paedophiles share kid porn, or where racists swap jokes about Jews, then repeat the same process. IP, geolocate, face recon, boom! There really is no end to the problems we could solve with the help of our flying executioners.

    You could send them after real estate agents, for example. Nobody really likes them, do they? The drones would be fulfilling a public service. “An exciting opportunity has arisen in an up-and-coming neighbourho-” Boom! Those nasty beggars on the street who pester you for a handout? Drone ’em. “Excuse me sir, could you spare a-” Boom! Urgh, the Kardashians, yuck. Boom!

    While we’re at it, let’s take care of bankers, lawyers and politicians. Well, only some politicians. Naturally, the drones will be in the hands of the politicians that matter, the good kind of politician in our sweet and benevolent governments. No, the politicians we can make the chopper-bombs destroy will be those with dangerous ideas about equality and wealth redistribution. Now we can finally put an end to these monsters once and for all. Democratic accountability? Boom! Anti-government protests? Boom! Online petitions? Boom!

    Fuck it, I hate lazy scroungers, disabled wasters and trade unionists. Boom, boom, boom! Gays, trans people and other sexual degenerates? Thanks to wide societal acceptance, we know who you all are! Boom! Find all self-confessed Muslims, Jews and other deviant devil-worshippers on the census, and fucking boom them in the head! In fact, forego that. Just send the drones into mosques, synagogues, temples, monasteries and religious schools. Boom! Black people will be piss easy to locate with omnipresent facial recognition software. Racial purity, here we come, not with a bang but with a boom! Statistics say that one in four adults suffer from mental illness. They also say that one in four adults has just had their head exploded!

    Boom! Fucking BOOM!

    If like me, you can’t wait for the day when all of society’s enemies can be destroyed mercilessly, leave a like and a comment, and don’t forget to share the good news with all of your friends 🙂

     
  • GeneticPsychosMom (Tina) 09:38 on April 10, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , , , , , , politics, , , Republicans, ,   

    Dear Kentucky, Mitch McConnell Might Be a Psychopath 

    Mitch McConnell Contradiction in facial expression - a smile with a frown - smirk and dead eyes

    Contradiction in facial expression – a smile with a frown – smirk and dead eyes

    McConnell: ‘Winners make policy, losers go home” and more quotes on “Stuff Psychopaths Say.”

    “No majority leader wants written on his tombstone that he presided over the end of the Senate,” the minority leader said.

    He continued: “Breaking the rules to change the rules is un-American. I just hope the majority leader thinks about his legacy, the future of his party, and, most importantly, the future of our country before he acts.”

    Are these the words of Minority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-N.Y.) as the Republican majority changed Senate rules this week to do away with filibusters of Supreme Court nominations?

    Actually, they were uttered in 2013, by then-Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.), when Democrats pushed through a similar filibuster change for lesser nominations.

    That McConnell did a 180 on the topic — going from the institutional defender of the filibuster to the man who destroyed it — is unsurprising. He has frequently shifted his views to suit the needs of the moment. But in this case McConnell was correct in 2013, and what he just did this week was even more ruinous than what he accused the Democrats of doing then.

    By rights, McConnell’s tombstone should say that he presided over the end of the Senate. And I’d add a second line: “He broke America.” No man has done more in recent years to undermine the functioning of U.S. government. His has been the epitome of unprincipled leadership, the triumph of tactics in service of short-term power.

    After McConnell justified his filibuster-ending “nuclear option” by saying it would be beneficial for the Senate, Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.) said this: “Whoever says that is a stupid idiot.”

    McConnell is no idiot. He is a clever man who does what works for him in the moment, consequences be damned.

    Back in 1994, McConnell lamented to the conservative Heritage Foundation that Republicans hadn’t used the filibuster enough: “I am a proud guardian of gridlock. I think gridlock is making a big comeback in the country.”

    For the next quarter-century, he made sure of it. Back then he was fighting all attempts at campaign-finance reform and spending limits, championing disclosure of contributions as the antidote. But when the Supreme Court allowed unlimited “dark money” in campaigns without disclosure, McConnell reversed course and has fought all attempts to enact disclosure.

    McConnell famously declared in 2010: “The single most important thing we want to achieve is for President Obama to be a one-term president.”

    ProPublica’s Alec MacGillis, author of a McConnell biography, “The Cynic,” reports former Republican senator Robert Bennett’s account of what McConnell told fellow Republicans after Obama’s election: “Mitch said, ‘We have a new president with an approval rating in the 70 percent area. We do not take him on frontally. We find issues where we can win, and we begin to take him down, one issue at a time. We create an inventory of losses, so it’s Obama lost on this, Obama lost on that.’ ”

    And that’s what he did. By 2013, for example, 79 of Obama’s nominees had been blocked by filibusters, compared with 68 in the entire previous history of the Republic.

    After Justice Antonin Scalia’s death was confirmed last year, it took McConnell less than an hour to say that the vacancy should be filled by the next president. He called keeping Obama’s nominee off the court “one of my proudest moments.”

    While other Republicans have at times been willing to criticize President Trump’s outrages, McConnell has been conspicuously quiescent. Although his predecessors at least attempted collegiality, McConnell practices no such niceties (recall his “nevertheless, she persisted” silencing of Massachusetts Democratic Sen. Elizabeth Warren). But most characteristic of McConnell is his tendency to shift his views to suit current exigencies (on the minimum wage, withdrawal from Iraq, earmarks, abortion, labor and civil rights) and his adroitness at gumming up the works: forcing clerks to spend hours reading a bill aloud on the floor; opposing immigration legislation he’d encouraged; asking for a vote on a debt-ceiling proposal and then trying to filibuster it; urging the Obama administration to support a bipartisan debt commission and then voting against it.

    Now comes the filibuster’s demise. In the current cycle of partisan escalation, it’s only a matter of time before the filibuster is abolished for all legislation, killing the tradition of unlimited debate in the Senate dating back to 1789. The Founders did this so minority rights would be respected and consensus could be formed — and McConnell is undoing it.

    Two years ago, when a Democrat was in the White House, McConnell said he would only abolish filibusters of Supreme Court justices if there were 67 votes for such a change. This week, he employed a maneuver to do it with 51 votes. It suited his momentary needs, but the damage will remain long after McConnell’s tombstone is engraved.

    Excerpt from “Mitch McConnell, the man who broke America“, by Dana Milbank, April 7, 2017

    Image courtesy The Conversation US

     

    Even Mr. McConnell’s fellow Republicans say somewhat admiringly that he can be a secretive and coldly calculating tactician with an eye for political openings, someone more consumed by political strategy than ideology or philosophy.

     

    Habits of Highly Psychopathic People Pic

     

    Psychopath TEST Politicians

    .

    .

     
    • nowve666 09:59 on April 10, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Much as I hate the GOP, I have a grudging respect for them because of their ruthless pursuit of having their way. At the same time, I have a reluctant contempt for weak-kneed Democrats who let them get away with it. Perfect case in point, when the Repugs refused to do their jobs in the process of confirming (or denying) Obama’s Supreme Court appointment. They just don’t give a damn. They’re like Honey Badgers. Everyone shakes his head and says how wrong it was and the GOP just goes ahead and does it anyway. Result? They now have that seat. Too bad the GOP agenda is everything I’m against. I would love to see that ruthlessness used in favor of an agenda I would like.

      As for the nuclear option, I wanted Obama to use it to pass the health care bill. I’m glad someone finally got rid of the filibuster although I don’t like what they did it for. Maybe now, when our idiot country finally wakes up and kicks these fascists out of office and we have a Democratic Congress, they will be able to actually pass legislation.

      Don’t Psychopath test politicians. We need a good progressive psychopath in government to make his ideas actually work.

      Like

    • Amaterasu Solar 15:54 on April 12, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      All high-up politicians are psychopaths. Maybe a few are puppets of psychopaths. Maybe. The psychopaths in control do NOT let Any get high up in politics unless They are on board with the psychopaths’ agenda.

      Like

c
Compose new post
j
Next post/Next comment
k
Previous post/Previous comment
r
Reply
e
Edit
o
Show/Hide comments
t
Go to top
l
Go to login
h
Show/Hide help
shift + esc
Cancel
%d bloggers like this: