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  • James 13:53 on June 1, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , heaven, immortality, killing, omnipotence, poem, power, , , , , through the eyes of a sociopath   

    Psychopath’s Heaven – a poem 

    Image result for all-powerful

    Power.
    Power.
    Power.
    How I crave after it. How I desire it. How I lust for it.
    Power over what?
    Power over something.
    Power over anything.
    Power over EVERYTHING.
    The power over life and death, to be able too look into the eyes of a man, look into them. And take life from them. To see it leave their eyes. The light in their eyes, I want the power to turn their eyes dark.
    I want to be invincible. To stare at death in the face, and laugh.
    I want to be immortal. To live for eons on end, never aging, never weakening. Only gaining power
    The power of destruction. To destroy entire cities with a thought. To hold countries ransom to my whims.
    Pure power.
    No responsibility.
    Absolute. Power

    © Wajahat Mahmood, 2015. See the original post here.

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    • Kim Kabar 18:11 on June 25, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Dominate.
      Last two lost.
      Tsk. Tsk.
      One is in jail
      The other is dead.
      No pity from me.
      Do you play chess?
      The last one asked.
      No, I replied.
      My bad. I failed to clarify.
      Board chess or life chess.
      The later, I will win.
      Pity, pity.
      They picked wrong woman.

      Liked by 1 person

  • GeneticPsychosMom (Tina) 10:55 on September 23, 2015 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , power, , , , , , , , , ,   

    The Sneaky Bastard’s (Sociopath) Playbook 

    The Sociopath's PlaybookExcerpt from BOOK REVIEW: The 48 Laws of Power By Ox Drover

    Many times on Lovefraud, bloggers have joked with me that a particular phrase or behavior “came out of the ‘Psychopath’s play book,’“ the kind of book in which a football team would write all their usual plays.

    I recently bought a book entitled, The 48 Laws of Power, by Robert Greene, because it sounded like an interesting book. But the more I got into it, I realized that the heretofore-thought-mythical “Psychopathic Play book” does exist, and this is it!

    Robert Greene, by the way, also wrote The Art of Seduction.

    Here’s what the jacket blurb on the back of The 48 Laws of Power says about its content:

    The best-selling book for those who want POWER, watch POWER, or want to arm themselves against POWER. Amoral, cunning, ruthless and instructive, this piercing work distills three thousand years of the history of power into forty-eight well explicated laws. As attention-grabbing in its design as in its content, this bold volume outlines the laws of power in their unvarnished essence, synthesizing the philosophies of Machiavelli, Sun Tzu, Carol Von Clausewitz and other great thinkers. Some laws require prudence, some stealth, some total absence of mercy, but like it or not, all have applications in real-life situations. Illustrated through the tactics of Queen Elizabeth I, Henry Kissinger, P. T. Barnum, and other famous figures who have wielded, or been victimized by power, these laws will fascinate any reader interested in gaining, observing, or defending against ultimate control.

    The 48 laws are listed in the contentsWolf in Sheep's Clothing

    Law 1: Never outshine the master

    Law 2: Never put too much trust in friends, learn how to use enemies

    Law 3: Conceal your intentions

    Law 4: Always say less than necessary

    Law 5: So much depends on reputation—guard it with your life

    Law 6: Court attention at all cost

    Law 7: Get others to do the work for you, but always take the credit

    Law 8: Make other people come to you—use bait if necessary

    Law 9: Win through your actions, never through argument

    Law 10: Infection: avoid the unhappy and unlucky

    Law 11: Learn to keep people dependent on you

    LiesLaw 12: Use selective honesty and generosity to disarm your victim

    Law 13: When asking for help, appeal to people’s self-interest, never to their mercy or gratitude

    Law 14: Pose as a friend, work as a spy

    Law 15: Crush your enemy totally

    Law 16: Use absence to increase respect and honor

    Law 17: Cultivate an air of unpredictability

    Law 18: Do not built fortresses to protect yourself, isolation is dangerous

    Law 19: Know who you’re dealing with—do not offend the wrong person

    Law 20: Do not commit to anyone

    Law 21: Play a sucker to catch a sucker—seem dumber than your mark

    Law 22: Use the surrender tactic: Transform weakness into power

    Law 23: Concentrate your forces

    Law 24: Play the perfect courtier

    Get a makeoverLaw 25: Re-create yourself

    Law 26: Keep your hands clean

    Law 27: Play on people’s ‘need to believe’ to create a cult-like following

    Law 28: Enter action with boldness

    Law 29: Play all the way to the end

    Law 30: Make your accomplishments seem effortless

    Law 31: Control the options: Get others to play with the cards you deal

    Law 32: Play to people’s fantasies

    Law 33: Discover each man’s thumb screw

    Law 34:Be royal in your own fashion: Act like a king to be treated like a king

    Law 35: Master the art of timing

    Law 36: Disdain things you cannot have: Ignoring them is the best revenge

    Amazing spectacleLaw 37: Create compelling spectacles

    Law 38: Think as you like but behave like others

    Law 39: Stir up waters to catch fish

    Law 40: Despise the free lunch

    Law 41: Avoid stepping into a great man’s shoes

    Law 42 Strike the shepherd and the sheep will scatter

    Law 43: Work on the hearts and minds of others

    Law 44: Disarm and infuriate with the mirror effect

    Law 45: Preach the need for change, but never reform too much at once

    Law 46: Never appear too perfect

    Law 47: Do not go past the mark you aimed for; in victory, learn when to stop

    Law 48: Assume formlessness

    Perfect advice for psychopaths

    The preface of the book gets right down to business:

    No one wants less power, everyone wants more … in the world today, however, it is dangerous to seem too power hungry, to be overt with your power moves. We have to seem fair and decent. So we need to be subtle—congenial yet cunning, democratic, yet devious.

    This game of constant duplicity most resembles the power dynamic that existed in the scheming world of the old aristocratic court(s).

    The author, Greene, then goes on to perfectly describe the psychopath’s ways, without naming him such “…those who make a show or display of innocence are the least innocent of all.” What else but a psychopath could “recognize…by the way they flaunt their moral qualities, their piety, their exquisite sense of justice … but (they) are merely throwing dust in our eyes distracting us from their power plays with their air of moral superiority….you will see they are often the ones most skillful at indirect manipulation, …and they greatly resent any publicizing of the tactics they use.”

    Emotions

    In directing his readers how to master the most important skills in acquiring power, Greene tells them that the most important foundation is to “master your emotions.” He states that an emotional response is the single greatest barrier to gaining power. In this particular thing, I totally agree with him, because if we are emotional about a situation, we lose sight of the ultimate goal, and as he says, “cannot prepare for and respond to it with any degree of control.”

    Greene goes on to say that anger is the most destructive of emotional responses, and “clouds your vision the most.” Again, I totally agree with Greene in this statement, but then he goes on to add what I would think is directed more toward the vengeful psychopath than to less pathological people, “If you are trying to destroy an enemy who has hurt you, far better to keep him off-guard by feigning friendliness than showing your anger.”

    The mask

    Psychopaths have been described by many writers as “wearing a mask” or even “the mask of sanity.” Greene seems to be very aware of this “masking” when he advises his readers that, “You cannot succeed at deception unless you take a somewhat distanced approach to yourself—unless you can be many different people, wearing the mask that the day and moment require.”

    Psychopaths tend to project blame for their behavior on to other people, to refuse to assume responsibility for any of the things they have done. They lie “when the truth would fit better.” Greene says, “Power requires the ability to play with appearances. To this end you must learn to wear many masks and keep a bag full of deceptive tricks.” He goes on to say, “Playing with appearances and mastering arts of deception are among the aesthetic pleasures of life. They are also the key components in the acquisition of power.”

    Green does not seem to view deception or the acquisition of power as anything immoral, and he actually says, “Power is essentially amoral…power is a game…and in games you do not judge your opponents by their intentions but by the effect of their actions.” He goes on to advise the reader to not be caught by assuming that someone has good intentions, or that their good intentions matter. Greene advises his readers that some sets of moral judgments are “really an excuse for the accumulation of power.” I can definitely agree with that last statement. Frequently, religion and moral judgments are used as justification for a power stance that has no other legitimacy, and does great harm to the victims.

    Chapter One

    For each of the 48 laws of power, Green has a short chapter that consists of the name of the law, the first being, “Never Outshine the Master.”  Then he has a section called “Judgment,” in which he explains more fully the named law of power. The first law is reasonably self-explanatory and makes sense, really, because if you show your boss you are superior to him/her, then he/she will resent you.

    After giving several good examples of using this law, or failing to use this law, Greene finishes up Chapter One by saying, “You cannot worry about upsetting every person you come across, but you must be selectively cruel. If your superior is a falling star, there is nothing to fear in outshining him. Do not be merciful—your master had no such scruples in his own cold-blooded climb to the top. Gauge his strength. If he is weak, discreetly hasten his downfall: Outdo, outcharm, outsmart him at key moments.”

    While this book seems aimed at the “amoral-wannabe-politician on the way up,” rather than the psychopathic “wannabe-gang-banger thug” on the corner who is illiterate, I think that those of us who have had or even will have associations with psychopaths, or “Snakes in Suits” (to highjack the name of the book as a noun), should read this to learn how to discern when we are being played by the power-seeker. If we can recognize the masks for their deceptive cover, we can avoid the consequences of being played, or possibly turn the play back on to the player.

    Disturbing, but necessary, reading

    Frankly, this book made me uncomfortable while I was reading it, I think possibly by showing me “red flags” of power plays that I had experienced in the past, but had not quite recognized at the time I was being played. However, I do think the knowledge I gained by reading this book is well worth the slight discomfort. It isn’t a book that you can “zip through” quickly, but one that must, like the textbook that it is, read and ponder, and even re-read, and ponder again.

    The most personally disturbing part of the book was one in which he was discussing the siege of Troy, and he said, “Image: The Trojan Horse. Your guile is hidden inside a magnificent gift that proves irresistible to your opponent. The walls open. Once inside, wreak havoc.”

    We must learn to protect ourselves from those power-players who have no conscience, the power players who will use calculated acts of kindness or proffered gifts to earn our trust. Selective kindness can be the biggest part of the arsenal of deception. “Aimed for the heart, it corrodes the will to fight back.”

    The 48 Laws of Power is available on Amazon.com.

    Source:  BOOK REVIEW: The 48 Laws of Power, by Ox Drover, December 2010

    Photos courtesy Ged Carroll, Kris Krug, Mary Doodles

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    Psychopath Test Politicians

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  • GeneticPsychosMom (Tina) 09:35 on May 11, 2015 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , , , , , , , pedophiles, , power, , , , , , , ,   

    The prevalence of #psychopaths and their power over society 

    There are many people whose behaviour and perceptions of others places them squarely in the category of antisocial personality disorder but they go their entire life without being assessed in psychiatric units or put in prison. We may live close to them, work with them or see them in the media. Many of us will have a strong sense that their character is flawed, their actions are damaging or their attitude to other people makes them dangerous. However, for a variety of reasons, we may suppress our intuitions. One reason for doing so is, if we were to dwell on these perceptions, it could shatter our sense of security and comfort.

    Sheep Then and Now cartoon picWhen we live in societies where ruthlessness in business and politics is rewarded and prized, the problem of identifying and curtailing genuine psychopaths becomes more challenging. As our search for the psychopath strays from prisons and psychiatric units to banks, trading floors, media companies and political parties, we become aware that society’s ability to challenge and control them has been limited.

    In fact, we may tolerate psychopathic qualities in politicians, television and film stars, sportsmen and captains of industry more readily than we do in our neighbours. Glib charm and callousness can, unfortunately, appear attractive qualities in celebrities, politicians and tycoons. It may be amusing to watch them on the television, but it should be remembered that those people are real when they are off the screen and have real impacts on real people.

    It is not surprising that other institutions and society itself struggles to identify them and respond to them adequately. After something terrible comes to light, members of communities often find it hard to accept that someone they liked could have committed such an atrocity. Others will say they had suspicions all along.

    The above was illustrated by the case of the disc jockey and serial child abuser Jimmy Savile, who used his larger-­than-­life character to gain entry into the BBC. Savile was already a paedophile before joining the BBC but, once secure within the institution, he was able to amass so much influence over people that he abused children with little challenge. There is even the compelling and sickening suggestion that he managed to avoid incarceration because he procured children for members of the British Establishment.

    After hundreds of accusations of sexual abuse of children and hospital patients came to light in 2012, a year after his death, some people attempted to defend Savile’s reputation. Even at the start of 2013 there were still people on social media defending his ‘honour’ and saying that because he could not contest the accusations in court the matter should be dropped. Fortunately, however, we live in an era of transparency, where society and the media are happy to slay degraded ‘heroes’ – and where victims of abuse can find a stronger voice than they had previously.

    The Savile case and the resultant splitting of views across society is a vivid illustration of how devious psychopaths operate and how they manage to shield themselves by creating tension between other people. It also serves as a useful illustration of how the personality of the psychopath may be revealed more by their impact on others than what they say.

    A forensic examination of the life of a psychopath can be like examining the damage caused by a cluster bomb. In the case of child abusers, the primary harm is secretly done to vulnerable individuals – some of whom may have little ability at the time to articulate what happened. Other abusers are drawn in and become part of the paedophile’s web, while some victims may subsequently and tragically become abusers themselves.

    The Savile case also helps us examine one of the key concerns of this book, whether the world we live in has become more psychopathic – more ruthless, cold, exploitative and antisocially individualistic. If so, we have to consider what processes and institutions are allowing and encouraging this to happen – and how we may all be allowing it to happen. The case illustrates how various organisational cultures and society itself can be infected and corrupted by the psychopathy of an individual, or small number of individuals.

    It seems quite possible that Savile used charity work as a way of insulating or immunising himself against accusations of paedophilia. Perhaps a shared understanding that accusations against him could harm the income and credibility of charitable organisations gave him power over some of those who felt dependent on his ‘support’. If this is the case, Savile made probably well­-meaning people complicit in his activities.

    By definition ‘successful psychopaths’ are people who avoid being identified as such. A murderer or a rapist does not only become a murderer or rapist when they are convicted – and a psychopath does not only become a psychopath when formerly diagnosed. Pathology precedes diagnosis.

    When we come into contact with people with psychopathic qualities we are often overcome by a sense of confusion, deep mistrust and also worry about being led astray by fantasies infecting our minds. We may suspect we are being drawn into danger but we may not be sure. Questions like “Did they really do that?”, “Am I being conned?”, “Am I just imagining this?” and “Can they really be that bad?” and “Maybe I am just being paranoid?” tend to flood our minds.

    These questions are difficult and divisive enough for experienced psychiatric teams to contend with, let alone family members who need to believe that a person cares about them, colleagues or children in need of approval and safety. It is testament to the persuasiveness of psychopaths and the smokescreens they create that the vast majority of the British public were taken in by a patently creepy man who surrounded himself with vulnerable children.

    Whether or not Savile consciously did charity work as a way to shield himself from accusations, the status and work certainly gave him unrestricted access to children. It is well known that paedophiles seek out positions where they have access to vulnerable children, and it becoming clearer that non­paedophile psychopaths similarly seek power. Unfortunately, while psychopaths are imagined as the knifewielding killers of Hollywood, not enough attention is given to the possibility that many more psychopaths quietly secure positions within society where they can exert maximum control.

    Studies of prisoners have helped us understand the minds of psychopaths but they do not reveal the predominance of psychopathic traits within the wider population. Psychiatrists cannot simply turn up to banks, parliaments and media companies and demand that people undergo mental health assessments and brain scans. Nevertheless, in recent years good evidence has been emerging that psychopathic qualities are far from the exclusive domain of prisoners and patients in secure psychiatric units. Those qualities are also found among well paid people in positions of power and within key occupations that society depends upon.

    Only by understanding how psychopaths operate within various areas of society can we understand how they help to create and maintain what I term psychopathic cultures.

    Excerpt from the Introduction in “Psychopathic Cultures and Toxic Empires” by Will Black

    photo courtesy of NakedPastor

     

    Psychopath TEST Politicians

     
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