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  • James 15:23 on April 23, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: A Current Affair, adventure, airport, Aussie, Australia, Bali, boy, , , , clever kids, current affairs, , funny story, G'day mate, genius kid, Indonesia, , , , Nine Network, Perth, plane, police, psycho, , , , , runaway, Sydney, The Merry Old Land of Aus,   

    A young psychopath? 

    “It was great. Cos I wanted to go on an adventure.” – the kid

    “He just doesn’t like the word no.” – Mum

    Take a look at this story: a 12 year old Australian boy steals his mother’s credit card, cons his grandmother into handing over his passport, then catches a flight from Sydney to Bali, in Indonesia, by himself, lying and charming people all along the way. A psychopath in the making? See what you think:

    The clip, uploaded to YouTube by Screen Tower 2, is from an Australian programme called A Current Affair, broadcast on the Nine Network on 23 April 2018.

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    • nowve666 16:00 on April 23, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Spunky kid. He certainly had his charm on too. I had a friend who was hitch-hiking in the South at the age of 14. He was busted for truancy. They put him on a chain gang. The bitch of the thing was that when they let him go after he completed his term, the cops came along and busted him all over again. He said they would just act like they had never seen him before. And there were old men who had fallen for this scam. Chuck cut through the woods to escape.

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      • James 13:15 on April 24, 2018 Permalink | Reply

        Lol, spunk mean semen in the UK. So “spunky kid”, uhhh…

        Liked by 1 person

    • Critter 16:52 on April 27, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Very good observation. That kid does not have many behavioral brakes, not to mention a fairly practical way to approach to things. He is pretty much cream of the crop, con man material, lol.

      Liked by 1 person

      • James 21:52 on April 27, 2018 Permalink | Reply

        What’s a behavioural brake? The thing that cemented it for me was not the kid himself, but the relatives. Dad didn’t even appear, despite being part of the story. Mum deflects blame to “the system” which let her son do what he wants. And granny, when she says that he’s a good kid, is lying. “Ah no, there’s no problem with him. He’s just…” (eyes go up to the right as speech falters) “…too intelligent for himself at the moment.”

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        • Critter 21:20 on April 28, 2018 Permalink | Reply

          If he’s half as intelligent as they give him credit for then surely, he wont have any problem anticipating his parents reaction if he run off with their credit card and passport. He tested their reaction twice before when they picked him up at the airport before, lol. He knows they will be pretty angry, probably stressed out and generally upset for a good while afterwards. None of that seem to bother him and any potential threat of punishment is not a problem either. Judging from the interview it doesn’t seem like he feel guilty or shameful for what he did. In short, he doesn’t seem have much respect for other people.

          He’s good at finding the answers the interviewer will like, even though the guy doesn’t even try to hide his scepticism. The tv host compared him to Frank Abagnale a famous con man, that’s a bit manipulative of him. That’s a bit like suggesting the kid only managed to pull it off because he has the same abilities, not necessearily true, there could be more to that story.

          The relatives come off as a bit shallow, hard to disagree on that. Granny is exaggerating the positive stuff, “he’s kind, he’s generous, he’s got a heart of gold and..Eh..Uhm.. Nah, there is no problem with him. He’s just.. He’s just… Too intelligent for his own self at the moment” she is excusing him and it doesn’t even make sense. She avoids saying anything that can be interpreted as negative. She knows he’s a selfish brat alright.

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          • James 09:56 on May 1, 2018 Permalink | Reply

            I agree with all of that, except I think the reporter and host were both taken in by his charm. Sure, they still saw what he had done, but sometimes that doesn’t matter compared to how someone makes you feel. Of course, there’s always more to the story, that we will never know (it would have been easier for me to make a judgment if I had got a look at the boy’s face, but that’s neither here nor there…)

            Tell me, what do you think of the boy saying that when he watched his parents walking towards him everything slowed down? That struck me as fake as fuck, taken right from some soppy movie (possibly one of the Home Alones!), but then I don’t know whether ‘slow motion’ is actually a thing people experience.

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            • Critter 12:31 on May 2, 2018 Permalink | Reply

              The reporter does seem pretty captivated, he wasn’t hiding that. His face and voice give me the impression that there is an element of conflict between what the knows and what he wants to believe, lol. He looks like he recognise the behavior.

              To me time dilation or slow motion type of experiences is more like something I reccon people would experience in critically dangerous situations (or possibly when certain drugs are involved). For him to experience everything slowing down when his parents show up simply sounds like an incredibly weird reaction. Even wierder when considering all the other stuff he managed to pull off without much restraint. I find that claim difficult to take seriously. It’s like something a drunken sailor would say to flesh out a story, or any teenager to impress his/her friends. He’s mother and granny were exaggerating stuff too, so he probably picked got that habit from home.

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              • James 14:30 on June 13, 2018 Permalink | Reply

                Have you experienced time dilation? I have stepped in front of moving vehicles more times than I should’ve – nothing remotely interesting happened, apart from the people around me getting scared. A couple of times, I said “my life flashed before my eyes”, because I’ve heard others use that one before.

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                • Critter 10:03 on June 22, 2018 Permalink | Reply

                  Can’t say I have experienced anything close to “slow motion”, but time definitively feel like it moves slower if fear is involved. Which can be pretty usefull, for slow people like me, lol.

                  It’s not that I’m the type of person that takes most/everything people say literally, but phrases like “my life flashed before my eyes” kind of sound a bit overly dramatic. Then again some people just have a lot of dramatic stories, which can have entertainment value without having to be 100% believable.

                  Liked by 1 person

    • Critter 11:09 on August 27, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Have you seen this talk by Frank Abagnale?

      He did most of his crazy stuff when he was in his late teens to early twenties. That guy has a “grifty” intuition like few others. He talks swiftly and fairly highly articulated, what parts of his story do you find believeable and which parts do you think he added because they make people get a better/useful impression of him?

      Just to be clear, I haven’t concluded anything about Frank Abagnales personality.

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      • James 09:03 on August 28, 2018 Permalink | Reply

        Haven’t got time to spend an hour watching that right now, but thanks for sharing. I enjoyed the film adaptation of his life with Leo DiCaprio.

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  • James 21:10 on January 12, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: aura, , crying, Discard - the final frontier, , , , , , , No Psychos - now with more boobs, , psycho, , , , , tears,   

    No need to cry about it 

    What is your problem?

    I’ve always found it odd that very young children cry. I think “What have you got to cry about? You have no responsibilities. You can play all day. You’re intellectually a simpleton, so there’s little chance of getting bored and the littlest things can keep you entertained. You have no concept of morality, and the normals haven’t even infected you with the misery they live with yet, so you can quite literally do whatever you want. Compared to this, the rest of your life is going to be a disaster zone. Wait until high school! Wait until mortgages and bill repayments and supermarkets and annoying coworkers. Wait until you’re mopping up the sick and poo of your own child, and wondering why they’re always fucking crying. Wait until you’re old, and your body and mind both start decaying before you’ve finished using them, and you keep putting baking soda in your tea and your cat in the dishwasher. These, your carefree days of childhood, are the good times. It’s all down hill from here. And yet, there you are – bawling like a, well, like a baby.”

    Then someone was kind enough to point out: “they have no other way of communicating.” Of course! It’s obvious. Silly me. But that is true primarily of babies, and it does beg the question as to why psychopathic babies (God, is that even a thing? A little cherub from hell come to devour your life savings and personal freedom.) don’t cry. Psychopaths are good communicators, or at least they’re good at communicating their needs to others and getting those others to provide for them, so why don’t they cry? That’s not rhetorical. Hey, I don’t have all the answers!

    Still, once we get into late toddlerhood, most kids have been talking for a couple of years and are getting quite good at it, and especially at asking questions. And we’re still in “Everything in life is great” territory, so what’s with the crying? Note that we’re talking genuine tears here, not tantrums or other such manipulations. Why do they cry with emotion?

    Now, having met and spoken with at least one person claiming to be an “empath”, the answer to this puzzle might be teased. I am still skeptical as to the existence of empaths, i.e. people with an abnormally heightened empathy such that they can almost read minds (or certainly hearts, if hearts be the organ of emotion). To me, it all sounds a bit Star Trek, a bit Deanna Troi. But I’ve met and spoken with a self-proclaimed empath, and since I’m the one claiming to be something most people believe only exists in slasher films, who am I to judge?

    Worst counsellor ever.

    According to the empath, most people are noisy. She doesn’t mean that they’re loudmouths (although I would attest to that also being the case), but that they’re emotionally noisy. Apparently, most people give off a kind of aura of emotion and for this empath at least the aura manifests itself as noise. Maybe the ‘noise’ is just metaphorical and other empaths choose to use more visual or tactile descriptors of auras, or maybe it’s all bullshit. I don’t know, but what I do know is that I am apparently not noisy. I am very quiet. Being around me, says the empath, is calming. Being around me is like when she’s alone. She can just be who she is, and focus on her own mind and her own emotions, without a constant onslaught coming from other people.

    I have never denied that I have emotions; all humans are by their nature emotional beings. But I have noticed over the years that mine are more level and altogether less bumpy than others’. I don’t get wound up easily, I don’t jump with fright, I don’t go to pieces under stress – indeed if anything adverse circumstances excite me and get me fired up. Knowing this about myself, and have it be recognised by this empath unprompted, does give a clue as to why, even in infancy, a psychopath may be far less prone to crying than others. The frequent crying of even children old enough to speak may not be nearly as much of a puzzle to others as it is to me; and indeed, given the apparently different emotional worlds we inhabit, this, I suppose, is to be expected.

     
    • nowve666 23:15 on January 12, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      ROTFLMAO!!! So you didn’t cry as a baby? Do you remember? Have you asked your mother what you were like then? One reason babies cry is physical discomfort. They get things like colic. They wake up hungry with wet diapers. They get diaper rash. And they might get lonely if they are left alone in their crib. They cry when they are startled with loud sounds. And I understand they need their mothers to “mirror” their facial expressions and get upset if their mothers don’t do it. Also, I understand most babies have empathy. So if another baby outs crying, the baby who hears it can start crying out of empathy. Obviously, we didn’t do that, I guess. Why do you call babies little psychopaths?

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      • James 05:42 on January 13, 2018 Permalink | Reply

        I don’t remember being a baby, but there are videos of me. I didn’t call babies little psychopaths; I was referring to babies who are psychopaths later in life, and was wondering if they already were psychopaths even as a baby.

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    • nowve666 09:01 on January 13, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Oh. OK. I read this very late at night. I don’t blame babies for crying a lot. After all, finding themselves thrust into this world. They don’t even known where their bodies end and the world begins. They can’t coordinate their arms and legs or even see in the beginning. They suddenly depend on an outside person, the mother, usually. She controls when they eat, when they are warm or cold, when their diapers change, etc. Then they begin crawling and then walking. Everything is really difficult. Fortunately, it’s not in the nature of a baby to be a quitter. They keep trying until they succeed. As for “the normals haven’t even infected you with the misery they live with yet,” I knew at an early age that adults were full of shit. I assumed most of what they told me was a lie. One of my earliest memories was distrusting what I was told. It’s not that they were necessarily lying. But they seemed to be deceiving themselves. I distrusted even things that later turned out to be true. For example, I was told New York, my hometown, was the biggest city in the world and the Empire State Building was the tallest building in the world. I immediately thought, “I’ll bet everyone says that about the city they live in.” I was also told over and over that childhood was the best time in my life, just like you are saying. I thought, “I don’t believe it.” Guess what. I grew up and discovered that childhood was not the best time in my life. I enjoyed adulthood much more. Sure, there are hassles. But there is also more freedom.

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    • Christopher Flore 15:30 on January 13, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Their parents’ struggle. I’ve always been interested about them crying, i figure sometimes they are born and don’t cry and other times they cry into the world, the other part is if the birth itself isn’t smooth but the two go hand in hand sometimes. There is a need to cry when there is sometimes btw and it takes the sadness out of you.

      Liked by 1 person

      • James 10:55 on January 14, 2018 Permalink | Reply

        Good point. Thanks for your comment, Christopher.

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    • Critter 07:51 on February 14, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      “…And we’re still in “Everything in life is great” territory, so what’s with the crying? Note that we’re talking genuine tears here, not tantrums or other such manipulations. Why do they cry with emotion?…”

      Crying with emotion over seemingly trivial stuff just happens to be a useful way for a developing brain to find ways to make those emotional responses be useful by the time they reach adulthood. That behavior is just a sign of impulse control and emotional regulation developing in a young brain. Good thing that process starts early isn’t it?

      “According to the empath, most people are noisy. She doesn’t mean that they’re loudmouths (although I would attest to that also being the case), but that they’re emotionally noisy. Apparently, most people give off a kind of aura of emotion and for this empath at least the aura manifests itself as noise. Maybe the ‘noise’ is just metaphorical and other empaths choose to use more visual or tactile descriptors of auras, or maybe it’s all bullshit.”

      I honestly don’t belive in the whole empath consept. Although to her credit, people probably do have the neurological equivalent of both a signal amplifier and noise filter, both somewhat adjustable, otherwise it would be extremely hard for people to adapt to different social environments. If that happens to be the way the brain does works, then empaths probably has a noise filter dialed to minimum and an amplifier dialed to max. In that sense, I would have to compromise and agree to empaths being ~ 50% right, lol.

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      • James 09:59 on February 14, 2018 Permalink | Reply

        Hi, welcome back (assuming you’re ‘Typical Critter’ from before)

        The noise filter concept definitely seems intuitively like it must exist. If you had the same level of focus in a large crowd as you did in a small group of people or in a one-to-one exchange, the stimuli would likely be overwhelming. As it is, a lot of people find large crowds stressful, but it must help a lot not having to listen to everyone’s conversations or keep track of what everyone in the crowd looks like, smells like, what they’re doing, what they’re wearing, various non-verbal cues such as body-language, expression, gait etc.The fact that we mostly don’t do this would strike me as evidence of a filter in action. Indeed, people I know who are most on edge in crowds (generally there is a past trauma behind that) report that they’re unable to tune everyone out; if they’re in a restaurant, they have to keep an eye on all the customers, staff and anyone else who comes through the door.

        “That behavior is just a sign of impulse control and emotional regulation developing in a young brain. Good thing that process starts early isn’t it?” Is that rhetorical? I don’t see much or indeed any use for crying over spilt milk or dead puppies. The emotional responses are not useful, they’re wasteful. While weak neurotypicals waste time leaking salty water out of their faces and grimacing, psychopaths (and indeed pragmatic neurotypicals) are working out how to solve the problem they’re faced with. So I would have to say that no it is not a good thing children learn how to be emotional wrecks from a very young age.

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        • Critter 17:39 on February 15, 2018 Permalink | Reply

          I have one anecdote when it comes to people who claim to be empaths, they seem to have a tendency to overinterpret things when it comes to other peoples emotional responses.

          “…While weak neurotypicals waste time leaking salty water out of their faces and grimacing, psychopaths (and indeed pragmatic neurotypicals) are working out how to solve the problem they’re faced with…”

          Most adults don’t get an emotional breakdown every time life throws shit at them, lol. Teaching children the basics for how to sort out their problems by themselves is kind of what parents are supposed to do. Kids aren’t as emotionally stable as adults because that makes it easier for their brains to develop. Pragmatic neurotypicals are just people who have figured out how to overcome fear, not give in to anger, not take themselves too seriously and especially not take everything people say too seriously either, but rather pay attention to their behavior in the longer term.

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  • James 08:00 on December 1, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , psycho, , psychopaths in song, , reader participation, , , spotify,   

    Songs about psychopaths – Spotify playlist now available! 

    Howdy, gentle readers. 
    Terrifying, dead shark eyes: Check. - THE COVER OF SWIFT'S "BAD BLOOD" SINGLE

    “Love’s a game. Want to play?”

    Long time followers of this blog may remember a post from 2015, Psychopaths in Song. It lists an ever-growing number of songs that I (and plenty of other readers) have discovered seem to be about psychopaths.  This is not, and has never been a list of my favourite songs, nor of those that others like. But there are a hell of a lot of great songs from From Frank Sinatra’s smoothly crooned promises, to Taylor Swift’s cycle of destructive relationships, each track has been picked for its illumination of one or more of the aspects of the psychopathic condition.
    Now, our humble list has been turned into a Spotify playlist! It has over 140 songs spanning practically every genre and era of the past sixty plus years of popular music, so give it a listen here.
    My thanks go to the many people who have contributed song ideas since the post was first published. The continued interest in the article means a lot to me. Of course, if there are any songs you know that really should be on the list but have been missed, do get in touch.
     
    • nowve666 10:22 on December 1, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      The wide range and diversity of these songs suggests that the great Dionysus needs psychopathy to be properly creative. What would people sing about if not for that?

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      • James 18:00 on December 1, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        I’m just intrigued. What has Dionysus got to do with this?

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        • nowve666 19:40 on December 1, 2017 Permalink | Reply

          Dionysus is the god of music. Ever read Nietsche’s The Birth of Tragedy?

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          • James 07:49 on December 2, 2017 Permalink | Reply

            That was supposed to be a reply to you.

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    • James 07:48 on December 2, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Right. I knew he was the god of wine, but I guess he wouldn’t be much of a god if he couldn’t multitask. I haven’t read any Nietzsche in full.

      Liked by 1 person

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