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  • GeneticPsychosMom (Tina) 11:04 on November 18, 2016 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , stock market,   

    The Corporate Psychopath’s Arsenal 

    An adult having a childish tantrum = psychopathy

    An adult having a childish tantrum = psychopathy

    Psychopathy, often confused with sociopathy, is typically defined as a personality disorder with symptoms of persistent antisocial behaviour such as frequent violence; impaired or nil empathy and remorse, and brash, disinhibited, egotistical personas. Whilst the term is often used by the media to describe the psychotic and mentally ill, Professor Robert Hare, the creator of the ‘Psychopathy Checklist’, explains that psychopaths are not disorientated with reality and suffering from hallucinations or extreme distress but rather are very rational and have a high awareness of their behaviour and environment. All of their resulting actions are made out of choice and are freely exercised.

    The Psychopathy Checklist, the most valid and reliable psychopathy measuring tool, points to three recurring observable characteristics of psychopathy: boldness, disinhibition and meanness. Psychopaths are well-known for their lack of empathy, coupled with predatory and parasitic behaviour. They are found in 1% of the general population but the number rises to 3.5% at the management level in corporate organisations.

    The Corporate Psychopath’s Behaviour

    Corporate Psychopaths are too often successful in organisations and the workplace. They are very career orientated but behaviourally they are ruthless, unethical, manipulative and extremely exploitative in order to quickly climb the corporate ladder. Some behavioural trademarks are:

    • Superficial charisma
    • Emotionally shallow
    • Pathological lying and manipulation
    • Lack of empathy, remorse or guilt
    • Promiscuous sexual behaviour
    • Grandiose sense of self-worth
    • Constant impulsive and irresponsible behaviour
    • Lack of realistic long term goals

    Psychopathic behaviour differs when exposed in different environments. At an organisational level or within the workplace environment, these behaviours would typically result in scenarios such as:

    • Frequent temper tantrums to cause high anxiety amongst peers
    • Ridiculing or blaming others for bad work performance
    • Intentionally spreading malicious lies for their benefit
    • Stealing credit for the accomplishments of others or sabotaging others
    • Refusing to take responsibility for behaviour or errors
    • Doing whatever it takes to close a deal with no regards for ethics or legality
    • Often taking the belongings of others without any intention of returning

    Research shows that there are more instances of corporate psychopathic behaviour at the management level when compared to the general population, the reported scenarios are as such:

    • Setting unrealistic and unachievable expectations to set employees up for failure
    • Reluctance or refusal outright to attend meetings with more than one person
    • Threatens perceived opponents with dismissal or discipline in order to taint employee profile
    • Refusal to provide sufficient training or instructions to victim
    • Invasion of personal privacy of employees
    • Multiple sexual encounters with junior and/or senior employees
    • Developing new ideas without real follow through
    • Public humiliation of others and even encouraging of peers to torment or humiliate others

    Havens for Corporate Psychopathy

    Corporate Psychopaths are attracted to organisations and positions where they can easily gain power, influence, position, prestige and money typically in the financial services, media and legal sector. Other less known sectors include the civil services (e.g. the military, police, government and even the clergy). Clive Boddy’s paper on “The Corporate Psychopaths Theory of the Global Financial Crisis” comprehensively explains and illustrates how corporate psychopathy when left to flourish at the top hierarchy of companies, specifically Wall Street Banks, were the main culprits of the Financial Crisis of 2007-08 in America. None of the biggest culprits were prosecuted and they got away scot-free with their ill-gotten gains. What was most revealing was their behaviour: their total lack of empathy for the chaos and massive suffering they had caused to individuals, economies and countries.

    There are measures to identify, prevent and monitor instances of corporate psychopathic behaviour in the workplace. The dilemma is the reluctance to use them due to company policies, data protection and confidentiality clauses. In our next article in this series, we will delve deeper into details concerning workplace norms, employment cases, legal implications and penalties of corporate psychopathy from a British perspective.

    Excerpt from “The Corporate Psychopath’s Arsenal” By C.H.I. Talent Assessment, Nov 8 2016

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  • GeneticPsychosMom (Tina) 10:21 on February 22, 2016 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , corporate crime, , , , , , fraud, , , , , , , , , , stock market,   

    Psychopathy and Corporate Crime 

    Psychopathic Personality Diagnostic Checklist

    Psychopathic Personality Diagnostic Checklist

    INTRODUCTION

    The relationship between psychopathy and violent street-level offenses has been well established.  However, psychopathic characteristics and behaviors have been normalized, tolerated, and even valued among corporate offenders. There is a paucity of research that explores the relationship between psychopathy and forms of elite deviance, and the connection between psychopathy and corporate crime warrants further academic attention.

    Psychopathy is characterized by glib/superficial charm, impression management, a grandiose sense of self-worth, pathological lying, conning/manipulativeness, lack of empathy, lack of guilt or remorse, shallow affect, and failure to accept responsibility. Impression management is indicated by efforts put forth by individuals in order to be viewed by others in a socially desirable or favorable manner. Grandiosity is typified by an excessive need for admiration, arrogance, sense of entitlement, envy, and exploitative tendencies towards others. Pathological lying is marked by a long history of frequent and repeated lying. Manipulativeness is characterized by charm, deceit, risk-taking, and carelessness about rules and conventions. Empathy has been defined as “the ability to detect accurately the emotional information being transmitted by another person”. Guilt “refers to the private feelings of a troubled conscience caused by a personal wrongdoing or by disadvantaging a valued other”. Although they are capable of concealing their emotional deficits, psychopaths are not capable of experiencing or appreciating everyday emotions, demonstrating a shallow affect. Psychopaths tend to rationalize and justify their behavior, often blaming others rather than accepting responsibility for their own actions.

    While there has been little research conducted on psychopathy and corporate offending, personality traits such as interpersonal competitiveness, positive extroversion, agreeableness, and neuroticism have emerged as principal personality correlates of white-collar offending. Interpersonal competitiveness is defined as extreme competition in which individuals are motivated to avoid loss and to defeat their rival counterparts. Positive extroversion is characterized by individuals who are talkative and spontaneous. In contrast, the disagreeable businessman is defined by characteristics such as bitterness, having condescending attitudes towards co-workers, and being easily angered or frustrated at unplanned circumstances and inconsistencies with order, rules, and corporate customs. Neuroticism is defined by traits such as anxiety, insecurity, sloppiness, and low self-esteem. While these traits explain corporate offending, other characteristics, such as those typical of psychopathy, can be extended to many of the traits and behaviors of elite criminals. As this thesis demonstrates, corporate behaviors illustrate several traits that are consistent with psychopathy.Monopoly. Big means you don't have to share

    CORPORATE CRIME

    In contrast to street level offenses, acts of elite deviance may fall beyond the scope of codified criminal law. Furthermore, many acts of elite deviance do not actually violate the law, but still have multiple adverse consequences for society. In fact, elite offenses cause significantly greater harm than street level offenses. For example, corporate and white-collar property crimes cause an estimated $404 billion in damages, while street level property damages are estimated to only cost $20 billion. Still, crimes committed by elites are rarely targeted under the current Crime Control Model.

    Elite deviance is characterized by illegal and/or unethical behavior, the maintenance or increase in profit and/or power for economic and political organizations, the open or covert assistance and support from elites who oversee such organizations, and the participation of elite and/or employees that work for people who are wealthy and/or powerful. Elite deviance encompasses a wide variety of behaviors, such as white-collar crime, corporate crime, corporate violence, occupational crime, governmental deviance, crimes of the state, crimes of privilege, profit without honor, and crimes by any other name.

    There has been a great deal of definitional ambiguity surrounding the conceptualization of white-collar and corporate crime.  A more recent definition describes white-collar crime as “illegal or unethical acts that violate fiduciary responsibility or public trust, committed by an individual or organization, usually during the course of legitimate occupational activities, by persons of high or respectable social status for personal or organizational gain”.

    Corporate crime has been defined as wrongdoing committed by corporate officials for the benefit of their corporation and offenses of the corporation itself. In addition to violations of the existing law, corporations may commit acts that, while legal, have many negative social consequences. For this reason, definitions of corporate crime should include any harmful actions caused by negligent, reckless, or intentional behaviors that are both lawful and illegal. Frank and Lynch (1992, p. 17) defined corporate crime as, “socially injurious and blameworthy acts, legal or illegal, that cause financial, physical, or environmental harm, committed by corporations and businesses against their workers, the general public, the environment, other corporations and businesses, the government, or other countries.”

    Examples of Corporate Wrongdoing

    In The Corporation: The Pathological Pursuit of Profit and Power, Joel Bakan (2004) discusses several examples of corporate wrongdoing. For instance, American corporations such as Nike, The Gap, Kathy Lee Gifford’s clothing line, and Walmart, often exploit impoverished countries for cheap and easy labor. Twenty-two separate operations take place to produce one Nike shirt. Five steps involve cutting the material, 11 steps involve sewing, and six steps involve attaching labels, hang tags, and packaging. The estimated maximum time to manufacture one shirt was 6.6 minutes, which cost $0.08 in labor and sold for $22.99. Typical sweatshop conditions are harsh and inhumane. Aside from receiving very little pay, employees in these situations are often humiliated and abused. Young girls are forced to take pregnancy tests and are fired if the results are positive. These facilities are usually located in secret, guarded locations and surrounded by barbed wire. Further, employees are often housed in substandard living conditions by the corporations they work for.

    In 1938, President Franklin Roosevelt passed the Fair Labor Standards Act, which banned sweatshops, child labor, and industrial homework. However, the act is routinely violated by the garment industry and many sweatshops remain in operation both domestically and abroad. Only 33% of the garment industry is in compliance with the law. According to Charles Kernaghan, director of the National Labor Committee, sixty-five percent of clothing operations in New York City are sweatshops. Many sweatshops in the United States employ illegal immigrants.

    Monsanto does not have my consent to use my body as a science experimentMany state statutes label individuals with four convictions as “habitual criminals”. In his study, Sutherland (1949, 1983) used the records of court decisions and administrative commissions regarding 70 of the largest manufacturing, mining, and mercantile corporations in the United States. His analysis focused on violations such as restraint of trade, misrepresentation in advertising, infringement of patent, trademarks and copyrights, unfair labor practices, rebates, financial fraud and violation of trust, violations of war regulations, and other miscellaneous offenses. He found that a total of 980 decisions were made regarding the 70 corporations with an average of 14 decisions for each one.

    There are countless other examples of corporate wrongdoing. Robinson and Murphy (2009) discuss several different types of corporate violations, including fraud, deceptive advertising, defective products, and deadly products. Fraud is defined as a form of theft in which the consumer is deprived of their money or property through deceit, trickery, or lies. Fraud occurs across a wide array of industries in a variety of contexts, such as consumer fraud, insurance fraud, credit card and check fraud, cellular phone fraud, health care fraud, Medicare and Medicaid fraud, telemarketing fraud, securities and commodities fraud, and automotive fraud. Quackery is a form of fraud that advertises worthless medical products, such as drugs, devices, and nutritional products.

    Institutional Anomie Theory

    The cultural element of Institutional Anomie Theory is centered around the notion of the American Dream, which leads to pressure for economic success and anomie. The term anomie, coined by sociologist Émile Durkheim, refers to “a weakening of normative order in society”. The American Dream is defined as “a broad cultural ethos that entails a commitment to the goal of material success, to be pursued by everyone in society, under conditions of open, individual competition”. The American Dream socializes people to seek out economic success and to believe that their chances of achieving economic success are relatively high. This facilitates the ongoing pursuit of rarely-achieved aspirations and material gains. This focus on material success undermines the importance of noneconomic structures, such as those related to education, family, and politics. The universal acceptance and pursuit of the American Dream creates a number of obstacles for people since the reality is that the existing social structure creates economic inequality.

    The four basic value foundations of the American Dream are (1) achievement, (2) individualism, (3) universalism, and (4) materialism. Individual self-worth is often evaluated on the basis of achievement. American society emphasizes individualism, as Americans are deeply dedicated to individual autonomy and individual rights. Universalism is described as the universal acceptance of cultural goals and values, as virtually everyone is socialized to achieve and to evaluate themselves and others using this criteria for success. Materialism is a focus on monetary success and material accumulation. All of these factors function in a way that emphasizes material gain while diminishing the importance of legitimate means to attain economic success.

    These cultural values, the devaluation of noneconomic institutions, and the portrayal of economic institutions and economic success of utmost importance can contribute to the commission of both street and elite crimes. In the context of corporations, seeking the American Dream, and the values associated with it, can motivate individuals to increase their gains at any costs necessary.

    Maximization is defined as “the concomitant utilization of legitimate and illegitimate means to achieve the goals associated with the American Dream”. This form of behavior involves simultaneously obeying the law and violating the law. Maximizers simultaneously engage in both conformity and innovation, such that the boundaries between law-abiding behaviors and criminal behaviors become distorted or disregarded. This is especially likely to occur in corporate settings where there is added pressure to achieve financial success and immoral, harmful legitimate and illegitimate means are normalized. Maximizers view their actions as justifiable. Crime and deviance have become normal in corporations, and maximization is the primary way corporations have achieved greater wealth.

    Differential Association Theory

    The culture of competition within the subculture of organizations also creates criminogenic conditions in which illegal and amoral acts are incorporated into organizational norms. The competitive struggle for personal gain and advancement is viewed as a positive individual strength rather than as negative or selfish. Any social inequality is viewed as legitimate and fair. The poor are stigmatized and labeled incompetent and lazy, while the rich and successful are admired, creating a strong desire for success and a fear of failure.

    PSYCHOPATHY

    Psychopathy is fascinating because it is a form of antisocial behavior disguised by a veil of normalcy. Indeed, psychopaths are so proficient in their conning and manipulative qualities that they can easily gain the trust of those who surround them. Seemingly impervious to the common plights of other psychological disturbances, psychopaths are generally well-liked by others and perceived as well-meaning.

    Cleckley (1941) formed the foundation for the pathological condition we now know as psychopathy. His work identified several criteria including superficial charm, lack of anxiety, lack of guilt, undependability, dishonesty, egocentricity, failure to learn from punishment, poverty of emotions, and lack of insight into the impact of one‟s behavior on others.

    The PCL-R four-factor model of psychopathy identifies several personality characteristics. Among these are conning/manipulativeness, impression management, pathological lying, lack or remorse of guilt, callousness/lack of empathy, stimulation seeking, impulsivity, and criminal versatility. Personality can be defined as “the set of psychological traits and mechanisms within the individual that are organized and relatively enduring and that influence his or her interactions with, and adaptations to, the intrapsychic, physical, and social environments” (Larson & Buss, 2005, p. 4).

    Other personality traits relevant to corporate violence that are not identified by the PCL-R are also explored. Among these are desire for control and openness/intellect. Desire for control can be defined as an urge to exercise control over everyday life events. Openness/intellect, sometimes referred to as culture, imagination, or fluid intelligence, is illustrated by an openness to new experiences, intellectual ability, and creativity.

    Psychopathy and Street Crime

    Those with higher PCL-R scores received reduced sentences and were able to appeal the sentences of higher courts successfully. This demonstrates the ability of psychopaths to continue impression management and manipulative behaviors during the course of criminal proceedings, ultimately deceiving the criminal justice system.

    Such capabilities are certainly relevant to extending this analysis to the exploration of psychopathic corporate crime. Psychopathic features such as callousness, grandiosity, and manipulativeness, are relevant to making persuasive arguments and potentially harmful decisions, while features such as impulsivity, irresponsibility, and poor behavioral controls are relevant to poor decision making and performance.

    Psychopathy and Elite Crime

    Lack of Remorse or Guilt - A lack of feelings or concern for the losses, pain, and suffering of victimsBabiak, Neumann, and Hare (2010) explain that our limited knowledge about corporate psychopathy is largely due to the difficulty in obtaining the cooperation of business organizations. They were presented with a unique opportunity to explore psychopathy and its correlates in a sample (N=203) of corporate professionals from various companies.

    PCL-R scores were not significantly related to the level of management held by participants. However, the authors noted that of the nine participants who scored 25 or higher, two were vice presidents, two were directors, two were managers or supervisors, and one held some other type of managerial position. Performance appraisals and 360-degree assessments indicated that psychopathy was associated with strong communication skills, strategic thinking skills, creativity/innovation, poor management style, and not being perceived as team oriented.

    According to Bakan (2004), corporations were initially conceived as public institutions intended to serve national interests and advance public goods. They are creations of the state, which granted them rights such as legal personhood and limited liability, and are viewed as independent persons. Bakan also argues that corporations are psychopathic and interviewed Dr. Robert Hare, creator of the PCL-R, on the subject. Hare points out several psychopathic qualities of corporations, including irresponsibility, manipulativeness, lack of empathy, lack of guilt or remorse, and superficiality.

    Hare explains that corporations are often irresponsible since they attempt to satisfy their goals by putting others at risk. They attempt to manipulate public opinion and display grandiosity by their persistence in establishing their position as “number one” and “the best”. Lack of concern shown for those that they have harmed and could potentially harm demonstrates their lack of empathy. Lack of guilt or remorse is illustrated by the fact that corporations often continue to commit the same violations after being caught and paying fines that are often trivial in comparison to their profits. Hare also argues that corporations are superficial in their relations since they attempt to present themselves in a positive light to the public, which is not representative of what they are in reality. Similar to the way in which a human psychopath uses manipulation and charm to “mask” themselves as normal, corporations present themselves as socially responsible, compassionate, and concerned about others. However, in reality, and as displayed in their behaviors, they are not.

    Excerpted from “PSYCHOPATHY AND CORPORATE CRIME A Thesis by ANGELA DAWN PARDUE“, August 2011

    Images courtesy Christopher Dombres, William Murphy, Dr. Rex, CountyOfLiars.com

     

    Psychopath TEST Politicians

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  • GeneticPsychosMom (Tina) 09:46 on December 28, 2015 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , stock market, , terrorists!!!?, ,   

    The Sky is Falling!!! TERRORIST Propaganda 

    Overreaction to terrorism is the true threat

    The TERRORISTS are Falling!!!?

    Terrorism is a passing phenomenon. It is not likely to become a permanent fact of American life. Nonetheless, it is a threatening part of today’s reality, and society must find ways to respond. The greatest danger is not complacency. Worse is the prospect that in our panic over terrorism, we willingly surrender some of the values that make our society worth defending. The true threat to our democracy is not terror, but our reaction to it.

    Since the 2001 attacks on the Pentagon and World Trade Center, about two dozen Americans have died as the result of terror attacks inside the United States. During that period, more than 100,000 Americans were shot to death [here]. Four times that many perished in car crashes. One hundred Americans die every day from opiate overdoses. Forty thousand commit suicide every year. Yet terrorism is the threat that galvanizes us.

    Part of the reason is that although guns, highway crashes, overdoses, and suicide take many more lives than terrorism, most of those deaths seem like private tragedies. They unfold as if inexorable. Terrorist attacks are the opposite: shocking public spectacles that rivet our attention with bloody mega-theater. As a result, the epidemics that truly devastate our society have faded into the background of national life. We are infinitely more determined to “fight” terrorism than we are to fight far deadlier scourges.

    Terrorism is frightening because it is an attack on a community, a nation, even a way of life. One of its modern variants, the sort carried out by Muslim militants, seems especially scary. Behind every act of Islamic terror, some see the stirrings of a global army that can rise to destroy our country and civilization.

    This is the way most Americans saw Communism during the 1950s. Politicians and the press portrayed it as an ultimate evil, capable of wiping away humanity and liable to do so at any moment. In retrospect, we can see Americans’ embrace of Cold War fears as a form of collective hysteria. Yet today we are panicking in much the same way.

    We are told, that to deal with the threat of terrorism, we must profoundly reshape our approach to privacy, security, surveillance, and criminal justice. Many “counter-terrorism” projects are designed and run in secret, so, informed debate about them is difficult. They are “on autopilot,” as Secretary of State John Kerry has said. Politicians clamor to support obscure and costly security measures rather than risk being portrayed as weak after the next attack.

    Some Americans, driven by a high-energy news culture and instinctively suspicious of the outside world, seem to delight in conjuring mortal dangers that they imagine threaten the United States. Last year the arrival of child refugees from Central America set off national alarm; now it is forgotten. Later we were scared into fearing that the Ebola outbreak in West Africa would poison us. Our over-reaction to those stories, however, was relatively harmless. When we overreact to the threat of terrorism, we risk irretrievably changing our society.

    The next bombing or shooting will not erode our liberties. Only we, ourselves can do that. The true threat of terror is that grotesque provocations will lure us into self-defeating choices. If we react by creating a surveillance state, abandoning the due process of law, and intensifying our military campaigns in the Middle East, we give terrorists victories they can never win on their own.

     

    Excerpt from “Reject the surveillance state” by By Stephen Kinzer, Jan 2015

    Photo courtesy: Sub Sonix

     

    Psychopath TEST Politicians

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    • James 12:12 on December 28, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      “Terrorism is a passing phenomenon” – okay then, nice interpretation of history. Typical American ignorance to think the very first act of terrorism occurred on September 11, 2001.

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      • James 12:18 on December 28, 2015 Permalink | Reply

        Ignorance and arrogance, I should say. The terrorist threat is real and ongoing, but we are only terrorised if we allow ourselves to be. In that sense, I agree with the writer here.

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        • @GeneticPsycho (Tina) 16:35 on December 28, 2015 Permalink | Reply

          The real terrorists are right here in the U.S. Death by cop is far more likely than death by foreigners. And we do nothing about that. We just keep pouring money into a war that the corrupt system doesn’t really want to win. The politicians just line their pockets with lobbyist money from weapons manufacturers. Terrorists are bullshit compared to our real problems.

          Liked by 2 people

          • James 19:02 on December 28, 2015 Permalink | Reply

            I agree. Though terrorists cause more harm internationally than your police officers do (let’s not forget who arms them though)

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            • @GeneticPsycho (Tina) 22:25 on December 28, 2015 Permalink | Reply

              Sure terrorists have always been in existence, and the white people killed the Indians, etc, etc, etc, terrorism forever.No white country cares about African wars. People are evil everywhere. My main position is that “terrorism” is in the news every day and people put “terrorists” into every conversation, and the fear of terrorists around every corner for 15 years and into eternity is ridiculous. Nobody’s getting rid of terrorists. People will always suck. The propaganda is used to take rights away and keep the citizens in the dark as to our real reasons for conducting illegal warfare. I understand your desire to keep “fighting”. Another psychopath I know just wants to go Genghis Khan. Well, psychopaths just want to “win”. Whatever that means. But he didn’t know that we already conducted over 8000 airstrikes this year alone. Which should have wiped them off the map, except for the corruption and suspected expenditure of bomb drops into empty desert. It’s a scam.

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              • Amaterasu Solar 11:13 on December 29, 2015 Permalink | Reply

                I will agree that SOME People everywhere are psychopathic/evil, but MOST of Humanity choose to behave Ethically. The psychopaths in control do things and then blame “Human nature,” as if society could function if even half of Us behaved as They do. Humans do NOT “suck” as a rule.

                And is it possible that the 8000 air strikes (at least a large number) are REPORTED but never really happened? Like the ISIS BS? (In Aleppo, a reporter interviewed many “Humans on the street” asking about ISIS/Daesh. Though We are TOLD that city was “overrun” by ISIS, every single One said, “Nope. No Daesh…” So clearly We cannot take a single thing We are told by the (now legalized) propaganda/psychopathis control machine.)

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                • @GeneticPsycho (Tina) 15:22 on December 29, 2015 Permalink | Reply

                  Humans do not suck as a rule, but enough of them are antisocial, if they aren’t psychopathic. There are numerous hate groups in the world. Take this website as an example: http://www.dailystormer.com/an-explanation-as-to-why-we-should-all-support-donald-trump/

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                  • Amaterasu Solar 17:08 on December 29, 2015 Permalink | Reply

                    Yes, there are hate groups – fomented by and promoted by the psychopaths in control – but… The percentage of Humans that fall into such groups is really quite small. The perception that “everyOne” is hateful is pushed in the media, but again, that is what the psychopaths want Us to believe, for it dispirits Us.

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                    • @GeneticPsycho (Tina) 17:12 on December 29, 2015 Permalink | Reply

                      I think hate comes from ignorance and lack of exposure to a different culture -perpetuated by insecure people, not always psychopaths.

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                      • Amaterasu Solar 17:18 on December 29, 2015 Permalink

                        While I agree that those are factors, and that the psychopaths are not ALWAYS involved, the focus in the “news” on such groups IS deliberate and serving Them. And many groups are specifically fomented, or infiltrated and diverted in such directions, or otherwise created (some completely fabricated for the “news,” no doubt).

                        Liked by 1 person

              • James 09:52 on December 31, 2015 Permalink | Reply

                Umm, I have no desire to keep fighting. I am too cowardly and selfish to be a soldier and have no desire for others to continue to risk their lives in pointless middle eastern wars. And if the west does eventually ‘win’, then that is not my win anyway. So you’re barking up the wrong tree.

                But I agree, paranoia and fear about terrorism is the real enemy. It is used, by terrorists themselves and more importantly by our own governments, to control the population. IS is Emmanuel Goldstein made flesh.

                Liked by 1 person

                • Amaterasu Solar 10:21 on December 31, 2015 Permalink | Reply

                  Few see the Goldstein element… Yes, indeed. But ALL the “terrorists” are governments, whether directly, fomented, or in the case of ISIS/ISIL/IS/Daesh, fully manufactured.

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            • @GeneticPsycho (Tina) 22:28 on December 28, 2015 Permalink | Reply

              Isn’t it obvious to anyone else that the U.S. took over where the Nazis left off?

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              • Amaterasu Solar 11:15 on December 29, 2015 Permalink | Reply

                It’s VERY obvious to Me…

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              • James 09:54 on December 31, 2015 Permalink | Reply

                Perhaps…

                Though the two regimes don’t resemble each other much, except for massive militaries and world domination.

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                • Amaterasu Solar 10:30 on December 31, 2015 Permalink | Reply

                  Once One looks past the superficial trappings, the heart is identical – what They are aiming for here is for the US to look like WWII germany. It’s not there yet, but wow, They are working on it. One “national emergency” and the pres will contend all those executive orders have power and He (or She) will become dictator and steal everything from Us. (Do take a look at the exec orders O has made! Truly ugly.)

                  Like

                  • James 17:28 on December 31, 2015 Permalink | Reply

                    We’ll see. But he’ll have to hurry it up, Obama’s getting kicked out in 10 months.

                    Like

                  • James 17:28 on December 31, 2015 Permalink | Reply

                    And you’ll be left with Trump or Clinton

                    Like

    • Amaterasu Solar 10:15 on December 29, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      Indeed, “terrorism” is a passing thing. When the psychopaths in control get what They want from Us They will stop manufacturing the “terrorists.” The fact that it rather suddenly appeared in the quantity the “news” reports is one clue that it is manufactured. ISIS is manufactured – and what is REALLY there, in anything, is the Israeli Secret Intelligence Service. The psychopaths recently (re)legalized propagandizing Us here in the US. Do We suppose They are not using this power? And 9/11 was done by the psychopaths, and ALL of the “about two dozen Americans [that] have died as the result of terror attacks” in the US since that false flag have either been complete fraud (no One died at Sandy Hook), or sacrifices if anyOne died…which even in both Paris attacks, is unlikely based on the evidence.

      Indeed We should not “overreact.” We should clutch Our freedoms all the more tightly and call out the true terrorists: Those who would wrest those freedoms from Us through the fraud, false, propaganda the “news” now feeds Us full of.

      Like

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