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  • GeneticPsychosMom (Tina) 08:21 on December 15, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , , , greed, , , , , , , , ,   

    Kakistocracy: You Asked for It 

    Ajit Pai Unmasked Psychopath?

    FCC Chair Ajit Pai Unmasked Psychopath?

    Many have accused FCC Chairman Ajit Pai of being a telecom shill between his background as a former Verizon lawyer and his determination to ignore all public input (not to mention complaints about comment bots) as he kills net neutrality. And apparently, his attempts at joking about it are only reinforcing those views. Gizmodo has obtained video of Pai trying to roast himself at the Federal Communications Bar Association’s annual event, including a pre-recorded skit where an actual Verizon executive (senior VP Kathy Grillo) talks about wanting to “brainwash and groom a Verizon puppet” to become the FCC chairman, with Pai responding that it sounds like an “awesome” idea.

    Aside from the jokes falling flat, there are all kinds of problems with the routine. To start, FCC officials shouldn’t be joking about being shills. Whether or not they have industry backgrounds (like former Chairman Tom Wheeler), they’re supposed to take corruption allegations seriously instead of turning them into comedy sketches. The humor fails in part because there’s a painful degree of truth to it — it wouldn’t have come up if Pai weren’t pursuing the exact deregulation policies that major telecoms want. And crucially, telecom executives shouldn’t ever be involved. If anything, Grillo’s inclusion in the skit supports accusations that Pai is on the take, since he’s clearly cozy enough with Verizon to recruit one of its VPs for a gag.

    For that matter, why would a Verizon executive agree to appear in a skit that makes light of corruption, especially knowing that the video might become public and damage the company’s reputation?

    Excerpt from “FCC Chairman Ajit Pai ‘jokes’ about being a Verizon shill” by Joe Fingas, December 9, 2017

     

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    • nowve666 10:15 on December 15, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      What an arrogant little pup! But that’s life under Trump. You probably think Ajit is acting like a typical psychopath. To which, I would reply not all bad behavior is indicative of psychopathy. This whole regime is like an alternate “reality,” a dystopian nightmare (or is that a double negative). Thank gods, we still have recourse to legal challenges. That can delay implementation long enough for a new government. Jones’ election in Alabama is a sign the tables are turning. And that arrogant pup, Moore, refusing to concede has got to be for the purpose of letting McConnell delay seating Jones so he can push through that dreadful tax bill before he is seated. I read that a sizeable group of Trump supporters are evangelicals who think Trump was chosen by “God” to bring about Armageddon. So the worse Trump does, the happier they are. They want the world to end. If that isn’t psychotic, it’s pretty damned close. Which is an excellent opportunity for me to point out that people who aren’t psychopaths can do things politically that are as bad if not worse than what a psychopath could do. Instead of testing politicians for psychopathy, maybe we should be testing voters for insanity. (I say this tongue-in-cheek as I know what an impossibly bad idea it would be to test voters. I haven’t forgotten the literacy tests under Jim Crow. I wish I could really think of a way to protect ourselves from crazy voters but, as someone said, “Democracy is a bad form of government but all the others are so much worse.”)

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      • GeneticPsychosMom (Tina) 10:22 on December 15, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        Anyone can be antisocial and corrupt. It is not necessarily the antisocial political moves that raise my suspicion of psychopathy. It is Ajit Pai’s gloating and glee over his foul actions that appear to be psychopathic.

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        • James 13:26 on December 19, 2017 Permalink | Reply

          You’re probably right there. Non-psychopathic politicians tend to be embarrassed by their own destructive actions. Makes you question what embarrassment / guilt is for when it doesn’t prevent moral shittery.

          Happy Christmas to you both and / or happy hanukkah to Fran.

          Liked by 1 person

        • TypicalCritter 11:01 on December 27, 2017 Permalink | Reply

          I agree.

          Non-psychopathic politicians often see a world that’s heavily colored by their own ideology, then add the fact that people who are good at lying, are also often even better at believing the lies they tell themselves. Behavioral brakes like embarrassment / guilt can be useful to have, but they are even more useful if people take the time to reflect over their own actions sometimes.

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          • GeneticPsychosMom (Tina) 17:54 on December 27, 2017 Permalink | Reply

            I think that the atmosphere of the political parties makes it into a gang or mafia type of expected loyalty situation. Nobody wants to be outcast, because they will be minimized and their voice will not be heard. The worst people then gain control of the best people in groups like that.

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  • GeneticPsychosMom (Tina) 09:04 on September 16, 2016 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , , greed,   

    Green Criminal Activity 

    trash dumping

    Crime statistics often present a distorted view of crime because they fail to include the large volume and scope of crime and harm that ecological disorganization produces. In short, green criminologists often reference this harm in comparison to traditional ‘street’ crimes that the state records for statistical purposes for crimes such as murder, rape, robbery, assault, larceny and motor vehicle theft. Green crimes easily surpass the volume and number of victims reported in crime statistics that are kept by the state. There are a wide variety of green crimes, and the victims of green crimes include non-traditional victims whom criminologists do not ordinarily examine. In addition to human victims, green crimes also have non-human victims including animals, plants, and ecosystems. Green crimes do not outnumber the crimes reported by the police such as murder, rape, assault, larceny, burglary and motor vehicle theft simply because there are more categories of victims. For instance, green-harms often victimize larger numbers of human victims in a single incident compared with typical street crimes.

    A single green crime may produce hundreds, thousands or even millions of human victims. Some of those victims suffer repeated victimization as green crimes can also unfold over long periods of time and have a duration not typically associated with street crimes. Each of these factors increases the scope, intensity, and numbers of green victimizations, making these forms of victimization quite different from the typical street crime victimization incident. Green harm and crime are important conceptually and theoretically as well because they have the ability to cause forms of ecological damage that change the very nature of the world.

    These green harms can also make the world uninhabitable. Abandoned towns and communities exist because of the health hazards posed by toxic pollutants and other related environmental disasters that are counted among green crimes. In the United States, for example, these locations include: Times Beach, Missouri (due to dioxin pollution); Centralia, Pennsylvania (due to underground mining fires); Love Canal, Niagara Falls, NY (due to widespread disposal of toxic waste); Pitcher, Oklahoma (due to concentrations of lead and zinc pollution); Treece, Kansas (due to lead pollution). These cities, and others around the world, stand as monuments to the tremendous harms green crimes can produce. In addition to these abandoned cities, there are currently 1,163 Superfund sites that are portions of cities, towns, and communities in the United States listed as containing sufficient levels of ground pollution to require remediation.

    The environmental impacts of the international capitalist economy include escalated carbon dioxide pollution and other hazardous pollutants. As some researchers note, corporations fail to consider how their behaviours impact ecological disorganization because they externalize the costs of ecological harms—ecological problems that are produced by corporations become social problems which the government, rather than the private firms that create those problems, must address. This shifts the expense of anti-environmental practices to the state, which must tax citizens to generate the funds for remedies. Corporations benefit from the combination of weak environmental regulations and a pseudo-free market which enables the corporations to externalize costs to the state. This, in turn, facilitates private-sector accumulation by transferring corporate costs to individual tax-payers.

    Exerpts from “IS IT A CRIME TO PRODUCE ECOLOGICAL DISORGANIZATION?” by Michael J. Lynch, Michael A. Long, Kimberly L. Barrett and Paul B. Stretesky. BRIT. J. CRIMINOL. (2013) 53, 997–1016

    Photo courtesy CoastalCare.org

     

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    • nowve666 10:26 on September 16, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      I wouldn’t call this “green crime.” Civil disobedience in protest of pollution such as the activists who are trying to stop the pipelines through Native American lands or the disgusting desecration of our marine life committed by BP can be called a green “crime.” Harming the ecology isn’t “green.” I’m not trying to be a word-nazi. But this terminology confused me until I read the whole article.

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    • Narcissism alert 00:42 on September 27, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      It is a green crime because it desecrates God’s green earth. It is another example of how laws have to be toughened in every arena to stop sociopaths from befouling everything sacred and important to the livelihood and sustainability of others. If not, they always game the system.

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  • GeneticPsychosMom (Tina) 11:16 on May 2, 2016 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , , greed, , , , , , ,   

    Psychopaths in Workplaces 

    A mannequin, like a psychopath, doesn't care about you.

    Psychopathy in the Workplace is a serious issue as, although psychopaths typically represent only a small percentage of the staff, they are most common at higher levels of corporate organizations and their actions often cause a ripple effect throughout an organization, setting the tone for an entire corporate culture. Examples of detrimental effects are increased bullying, conflict, stress, staff turnover and absenteeism; reduction in productivity and social responsibility. Ethical standards of entire organisations can be badly damaged if a corporate psychopath is in charge.

    Academics refer to psychopaths in the workplace individually variously as workplace psychopaths, executive psychopaths, corporate psychopaths, business psychopaths, successful psychopaths, office psychopaths, white collar psychopaths, industrial psychopaths, organizational psychopaths or occupational psychopaths.

    Robert D. Hare reports that about 1 percent of the general population meets the clinical criteria for psychopathy. Hare further claims that the prevalence of corporate psychopaths is higher in the business world than in the general population. Figures of around 3–4% have been cited for more senior positions in business. However, even with this small percentage, corporate psychopaths can do enormous damage when they are positioned in senior management roles.

    General

    Oliver James identifies psychopathy as one of the dark triadic personality traits in the workplace, the others being narcissism and Machiavellianism.

    Workplace psychopaths are often charming to staff above their level in the workplace hierarchy but abusive to staff below their level.

    Hare considers newspaper tycoon Robert Maxwell to have been a strong candidate as a corporate psychopath.

    Differentiation is made between:

    • successful psychopaths – corporate high climbers who tend to have had a relatively privileged background with little risk of legal penalties

    • unsuccessful psychopaths – involved in regular crime who tend to have had less privileged backgrounds and much higher risk of legal penalties.

    The organizational psychopath

    The organizational psychopath craves a god-like feeling of power and control over other people. They prefer to work at the very highest levels of their organizations, allowing them to control the greatest number of people. Psychopaths who are political leaders, managers, and CEOs fall into this category.

    Organizational psychopaths generally appear to be intelligent, sincere, powerful, charming, witty, and entertaining communicators. They quickly assess what people want to hear and then create stories that fit those expectations. They will con people into doing their work for them, take credit for other people’s work and even assign their work to junior staff members. They have low patience when dealing with others, display shallow emotions, are unpredictable, undependable and fail to take responsibility if something goes wrong that is their fault.

    Careers with the highest proportion of psychopaths

    According to Dutton, the ten careers that have the highest proportion of psychopaths are:

    1. CEO

    2. Lawyer

    3. Media (TV/radio)

    4. Salesperson

    5. Surgeon

    6. Journalist

    7. Police officer

    8. Clergy

    9. Chef

    10. Civil servant

    Behavioural patterns

    The workplace psychopath may show a high number of the following behavioural patterns. The individual behaviours themselves are not exclusive to the workplace psychopath; though the higher number of patterns exhibited the more likely he or she will conform to the psychopath’s characteristic profile:

    • Public humiliation of others (high propensity of having temper tantrums or ridiculing work performance)

    • Malicious spreading of lies (intentionally deceitful)

    • Remorseless or devoid of guilt

    • Frequently lies to push his/her point

    • Rapidly shifts between emotions – used to manipulate people or cause high anxiety

    • Intentionally isolates persons from organizational resources

    • Quick to blame others for mistakes or for incomplete work even though he/she is guilty

    • Encourages co-workers to torment, alienate, harass and/or humiliate other peers

    • Takes credit for other people’s accomplishments

    • Steals and/or sabotages other persons’ works

    • Refuses to take responsibility for misjudgements and/or errors

    • Threatens any perceived enemy with job loss and/or discipline in order to taint employee file

    • Sets unrealistic and unachievable job expectations to set employees up for failure

    • Refuses or is reluctant to attend meetings with more than one person

    • Refuses to provide adequate training and/or instructions to singled out victim

    • Invades personal privacy of others

    • Has multiple sexual encounters with junior and/or senior employees

    • Develops new ideas without real follow-through

    • Very self-centered and extremely egotistical (often conversation revolves around them – great deal of self-importance)

    • Often borrows money and/or other material objects without any intentions of giving it back

    • Will do whatever it takes to close the deal (no regards for ethics or legality)

    How a typical workplace psychopath climbs to and maintains power

    The authors of the book Snakes in Suits: When Psychopaths Go to Work describe a five-phase model of how a typical workplace psychopath climbs to and maintains power:

    1. Entry – psychopaths may use highly developed social skills and charm to obtain employment into an organisation. At this stage it will be difficult to spot anything which is indicative of psychopathic behaviour, and as a new employee one might perceive the psychopath to be helpful and even benevolent.

    2. Assessment – psychopaths will weigh one up according to one’s usefulness, and one could be recognised as either a pawn (who has some informal influence and will be easily manipulated) or a patron (who has formal power and will be used by the psychopath to protect against attacks)

    3. Manipulation – psychopath will create a scenario of “psychopathic fiction” where positive information about themselves and negative disinformation about others will be created, where one’s role as a part of a network of pawns or patrons will be utilised and will be groomed into accepting the psychopath’s agenda.

    4. Confrontation – the psychopath will use techniques of character assassination to maintain their agenda, and one will be either discarded as a pawn or used as a patron

    5. Ascension – one’s role as a patron in the psychopath’s quest for power will be discarded, and the psychopath will take for himself/herself a position of power and prestige from anyone who once supported them.

    Why psychopaths readily get hired

    Leading commentators on psychopathy have said that companies inadvertently attract employees who are psychopaths because of the wording of their job advertisements and their desire to engage people who are prepared to do whatever it takes to be successful in business. Corporate psychopaths are thus recruited into organisations because they make a distinctly positive impression on first meeting. They appear to be alert, friendly and easy to get along with and talk to. They look like they are of good ability, emotionally well adjusted and reasonable, and these traits make them attractive to those in charge of hiring staff within organisations. Other researchers confirm that psychopaths can present themselves as likeable and personally attractive. Companies often rely on interview performance alone and do not conduct other checks such as taking references. Being accomplished liars helps psychopaths obtain the jobs they want.

    Why psychopaths readily get promoted

    Corporate psychopaths within organizations may be singled out for rapid promotion because of their polish, charm, and cool decisiveness. They are also helped by their manipulative and bullying skills. They create confusion around them (divide and rule etc.) using instrumental bullying to promote their own agenda.

    Bad consequences

    Boddy identifies the following bad consequences of workplace psychopathy (with additional cites in some cases):

    • workplace bullying of employees

    • employees lose their jobs

    • legal liabilities

    • shareholders lose their investments

    • capitalism loses some of its credibility

    • wasted employee time

    • sub-optimal employee performance

    • increased workload

    • difficult working conditions

    • poor levels of job satisfaction

    • lower perceived levels of corporate social responsibility

    • raised staff turnover

    • absenteeism

    • heightened level of workplace conflict – arguments, yelling, rudeness, divide and conquer

    • counterproductive work behavior

    Counterproductive work behavior

    Boddy suggests that because of abusive supervision by corporate psychopaths, large amounts of anti-corporate feeling will be generated among the employees of the organisations that corporate psychopaths work in. This should result in high levels of counterproductive behaviour as employees give vent to their anger with the corporation, which they perceive to be acting through its corporate psychopathic managers in a way that is eminently unfair to them.

    Jail Not Bail for BankersCorporate psychopath theory of the global financial crisis

    Boddy makes the case that corporate psychopaths were instrumental in causing the 2007–08 global financial crisis. He claims that the same corporate psychopaths who probably caused the crisis by self-seeking greed and avarice are now advising the government on how to get out of the crisis.

    Psychologist Oliver James has described the credit crunch as a “mass outbreak of corporate psychopathy which resulted in something that very nearly crashed the whole world economy.”

    Screening

    From an organizational perspective, organizations can insulate themselves from the organizational psychopath by taking the following steps when recruiting:

    • conduct behavioural type interview

    • verify information contained in the curriculum vitae

    • conduct reference checks

    • obtain work samples

    • carry out criminal reference checks.

    The following tests could be used to screen psychopaths:

    • Psychopathy Checklist: Screening Version (PCL:SV)

    • Psychopathy Measure – Management Research Version (PM-MRV)

    • Business-Scan (B-SCAN) test.

    There have been anecdotal reports that at least one UK bank was using a psychopathy measure to actively recruit psychopaths.

    Workplace bullying overlap

    Narcissism, lack of self-regulation, lack of remorse and lack of conscience have been identified as traits displayed by bullies. These traits are shared with psychopaths, indicating that there is some theoretical cross-over between bullies and psychopaths. Bullying is used by corporate psychopaths as a tactic to humiliate subordinates. Bullying is also used as a tactic to scare, confuse and disorient those who may be a threat to the activities of the corporate psychopath Using meta data analysis on hundred of UK research papers, Boddy concluded that 36% of bullying incidents was caused by the presence of corporate psychopaths. According to Boddy there are two types of bullying:

    • predatory bullying – the bully just enjoys bullying and tormenting vulnerable people for the sake of it

    • instrumental bullying – the bullying is for a purpose, helping the bully achieve his or her goals.

    A corporate psychopath uses instrumental bullying to further his goals of promotion and power as the result of causing confusion and divide and rule.

    People with high scores on a psychopathy rating scale are more likely to engage in bullying, crime and drug use than other people. Hare and Babiak noted that about 29 percent of corporate psychopaths are also bullies. Other research has also shown that people with high scores on a psychopathy rating scale were more likely to engage in bullying, again indicating that psychopaths tend to be bullies in the workplace.

    A workplace bully or abuser will often have issues with social functioning. These types of people often have psychopathic traits that are difficult to identify in the hiring and promotion process. These individuals often lack anger management skills and have a distorted sense of reality. Consequently, when confronted with the accusation of abuse, the abuser is not aware that any harm was done.

    Excerpt from “Psychopathy in Workplace” by Assignment Point

    Photos courtesy Chris Sheppard, CODEPINK

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