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  • GeneticPsychosMom (Tina) 09:26 on October 20, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , dark triad, ego, , , , , , , ,   

    A Narcissist, a Psychopath, and a Machiavellian Walk into a Bar… 

    The bartender asks, ‘who has the darkest personality out of you three?’ The Narcissist says ‘me’, the Psychopath says, ‘I don’t care’ and the Mach says ‘it’s whoever I want it to be’.

    All embarrassing jokes aside, the Dark Triad of Personality rather ominously named, is an area of Psychological research which is attracting significant attention. It is however only a young field, in fact, it was just over a decade ago that Paulhus and Williams (2002) coined the term ‘Dark Triad’. It’s an area of research that seems to intrigue Organisational, Clinical and Forensic Psychologists alike and of course, has important implications for society as a whole. However, is there any real merit, use and/or empirical rigour in the study of these traits? I was inspired to delve a little deeper into the Dark Triad after last month’s blog on office politics, which touched on certain characteristics which fall within the remit of these traits i.e. manipulating others for self gain.

    So what does the Dark Triad consist of?

    Narcissism: characterised by grandiosity, entitlement, dominance, and superiority (Corry, Merritt, Mrug, & Pamp, 2008). The scale largely used to measure this trait is the Narcissistic Personality Inventory (NPI; Raskin & Hall, 1979).

    Psychopathy: characterised by high levels of impulsivity and thrill-seeking along with low levels of empathy (Hare, 1985). It has been described as the most ‘malevolent’ of the Dark Triad (Rauthmann, 2012). The scale which is largely used in the literature to measure Psychopathy is the Self-Report Psychopathy (SRP) scale, version III forthcoming (Paulhus, Neumann, & Hare). It was modelled on the Psychopathy Check List (Hare, 1991), which is largely seen as the ‘‘gold standard’’ for the measurement of forensic Psychopathy.

    Machiavellianism: characterised as being cynical, unprincipled and using manipulation of others for self-gain and life success (Jones & Palhaus, 2009). The scale which is most used to measure this construct is the Mach IV (Christie & Geis, 1970).

    Global measures of the triad have recently been created such as the Dirty Dozen, a 12 item scale (Jonason & Webster, 2010) and the Short Dark Triad, a 27 item scale (SD3; Jones & Paulhus, forthcoming).

    Both Narcissism and Psychopathy have migrated from the clinical literature as personality disorders found in DSM-IV, whilst Machiavellianism has been distilled from the philosophy and tactics of Nicolo Machiavelli. In this instance, they have been applied to the sub-clinical population in much the same way as the Big Five personality factors. It is suggested that there are extreme personalities in our communities, which cross the boundary over into subclinical Dark Triad territory. In fact, a recent TED talk* highlighted the fact that as many as 1% of ‘normal people’ could be classed as a Psychopath, rising to 4% in CEO’s and business leaders.

    Much of my research into the Dark Triad was precipitated by an excellent new review of the literature by Furnham, Richards & Paulhus (2013). Hence please refer to this for a more detailed account of this area. They do a particularly good job at highlighting the major outcomes which the Dark Triad predict, across the workplace, educational and evolutionary literature.

    Focussing on workplace behaviours, they cite research which shows that while leaders who are high in such traits can be successful in navigating their way to the top (when coupled with high IQ and attractiveness, apparently), most eventually fall or derail in the end (Furnham, 2010). They are described by Hogan (2007) as being able to ‘get ahead’ but not ‘get along’ – which eventually comes back to haunt them. Specific behaviours include Narcissists’ softer methods of manipulation, while Psychopaths use harder, more direct methods and Machs are able to be flexible and switch between both methods (Jonason, Slomski, & Partyka, 2012). With extremely successful publications such as Snakes in Suits raising awareness of Dark Triad traits and behaviours, leadership derailment and management style are more relevant and important than ever.

    In terms of specifics, research indicates that Psychopaths tend to make negative impressions in short meetings (Rauthman, 2012), while Machs have the most questionable morals and are most cynical towards others (Rauthman, 2012). Lastly, Narcissists believe themselves to be good leaders, with high emotional intelligence even though they are perceived negatively by those around them (Petrides et al, 2011). Globally, however, all three Dark Triad traits exhibit a drive for ruthless self-advancement (Zuroff, Fournier, Patall, & Leybman, 2010).

    A word of warning; whereas Psychopaths react aggressively to physical threat, Narcissists do so to ego-threat (Jones & Palhaus, 2010). However, Machs are more deliberate and cautious as to how they react and respond as they don’t give into temptation as easily as the other two typically do (Williams, Nathanson & Paulhus, 2010). Therefore, when thinking about corporate crime, Jones et al (2012) suggest that it is the Mach who is unhindered by the impulsivity of the Psychopath, and displays of hedonism of the Narcissist to be the most successful perpetrator of white-collar crimes.

    All jokes aside, the next time you face an aggressive bully, you could be dealing with a Psychopath. The next time you face an overtly arrogant manager, you could be dealing with a Narcissist. And finally, the next time you find yourself manoeuvred out of an opportunity, you may have just been made a victim of a Mach’s manipulation. The Dark Triad does exist, perhaps in all of us. However, in the vast majority of us, they do so to a much lesser extent than that 1% of the population that they truly manifest themselves in.

    Written by Raj Chopra, TPF committee member.

    Follow me on Twitter: @Raj_Chopra24, follow TPF on Twitter: @TPF_UK.

    References

    Christie, R. C., & Geis, F. L. (1970). Studies in Machiavellianism. New York: Academic press.

    Corry, N., Merritt, R. D., Mrug, S., & Pamp, B. (2008). The factor structure of the Narcissistic Personality Inventory. Journal of Personality Assessment, 90, 593–600.

    Furnham, A. (2010). The Elephant in the Boardroom: The Causes of Leadership Derailment. Basingstoke: Palgrave MacMillan.

    Furnham, A., Richards, S.C. & Paulhus, D.L. (2013) The Dark Triad of Personality: A 10 Year Review. Social and Personality Psychology Compass, 7/3, 199–216,

    Hare, R. D. (1985). Comparison of procedures for the assessment of psychopathy. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 53, 7–16.

    Hare, R. D. (1991). The Hare Psychopathy Checklist-Revised. Toronto: Multi-Health Systems.

    Hogan, R. (2007). Personality and the Fate of Organizations. Mahwah, NJ: Erlbaum.

    Jonason, P. K., Slomski, S., & Partyka, J. (2012). The Dark Triad at work: How toxic employees get their way. Personality and Individual Differences, 52, 449–453.

    Jonason, P. K., & Webster, G. D. (2010). The Dirty Dozen: A concise measure of the Dark Triad. Psychological Assessment, 22, 420–432.

    Jones, D. N., & Paulhus, D. L. (2009). Machiavellianism. In M. R. Leary & R. H. Hoyle (Eds.), Handbook of Individual Differences in Social Behavior (pp. 93–108). New York: Guilford.

    Jones, D. N., & Paulhus, D. L. (2010). Different provocations trigger aggression in narcissists and psychopaths. Social Psychological and Personality Science, 1, 12–18.

    Jones, D. N., & Paulhus, D. L. forthcoming. Introducing the Short Dark Triad (SD3): A brief measure of dark personalities. Manuscript under review.

    Paulhus, D. L., Neumann, C. S., & Hare, R. D. forthcoming. Manual for the Self-Report Psychopathy (SRP) Scale. Toronto: Multi-Health Systems.

    Paulhus, D. L, & Williams, K. M. (2002). The Dark Triad of personality: Narcissism, Machiavellianism, and psychopathy. Journal of Research in Personality, 36, 556–563.

    Petrides, K. V., Vernon, P. A., Schermer, J. A., & Veselka, L. (2011). Trait emotional intelligence and the Dark Triad of personality. Twin Research and Human Genetics, 14, 35–41.

    Raskin, R. N., & Hall, C. S. (1979). Narcissistic Personality Inventory. Psychological Reports, 45, 590.

    Rauthmann, J. F. (2012). The Dark Triad and interpersonal perception: Similarities and differences in the social consequences of narcissism, Machiavellianism, and psychopathy. Social Psychological and Personality Science, 3, 487–496.

    Williams, K. M., Nathanson, C., & Paulhus, D. L. (2010). Identifying and profiling scholastic cheaters: Their personality, cognitive ability, and motivation. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Applied, 16, 293–307.

    Zuroff, D. C., Fournier, M. A., Patall, E. A., & Leybman, M. J. (2010). Steps toward an evolutionary personality psychology: Individual differences in the social rank domain. Canadian Psychology, 51, 58–66.

    Reblogged from: A Narcissist, a Psychopath and a Machiavellian Walk into a Bar…  by Raj Chopra, June 23, 2013

     

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    • nowve666 09:47 on October 20, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      I think Machiavellianism is a strategy, not a personality characteristic in itself as if Narcissism and Psychopathy. Both Narcs and ‘Paths can be Machiavellian to achieve their ends. An NT can also use Machiavellian tactics at times. But it’s a technique, not a personality “disorder.” Therefore, I don’t think “the dark triad” should be treated as a “thing.” Three people might have walked into the bar but the third one can be a Narc or a ‘Path or an NT.

      Liked by 1 person

  • GeneticPsychosMom (Tina) 09:45 on October 12, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , , , , , ,   

    A Psychopathic Friend Indeed 

    Some people can NEVER be trusted. There are roughly 12 million psychopaths in the U.S. alone – could be your family, friends, coworkers, or politicians. They do not belong in policymaking positions. I am running psychopathy awareness campaigns to teach people how to quickly spot a psychopath.

    WHY???

    Psychopaths do not care about the consequences of their actions on other people. If you are unlucky enough to be associated with one, you have a good chance of being stomped on. A psychopath has no problem smearing your name, slandering you, abandoning you, cheating you, tricking you, or otherwise causing your downfall.

    As if to prove my point – here is an example of my “friend” James posting his disordered drivel to my ad on Facebook.

    James the ugly troll

    “I’ve known Tina a long time; she’s a con artist, and this is a confidence trick.”

     

    Psychopath TEST Politicians

     

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    • Amaterasu Solar 10:02 on October 12, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      I might point out that We can’t keep Them out of the corporation Most call “government…” Psychopaths OWN that corporation (and ALL the “governments” on Our planet), and WE have no say in who THEY SElect for the offices of that corporation. They create the ILLUSION that We have any say. This is why I advocate not consenting to Their rule. As long as We have top-down controlminds, psychopaths WILL find a way to be in control of Us. Far better is to reclaim Our personal sovereignty on OUR planet (stolen from Us by the psychopaths in control through “trusts” and deceit) and consent to ways of operating Human society that promote the CARING Ones to take care of things…

      Like

    • nowve666 11:17 on October 12, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      You CAN trust psychopaths — to be psychopaths. That said, I expect politicians to act on their own self-interest. Let your representative know you won’t vote for hir unless s/he votes the way I want. The problem is people who vote against their own self-interest like working-class folk who voted for Reagan. Since working people outnumber the rich, if we all voted our self-interest, we’d be better off.

      Like

      • Amaterasu Solar 11:49 on October 12, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        Even if We ALL “voted” for a good Individual, THEY (the owners of the corporation They indoctrinate Us into thinking is Our “government”) will TELL Us We “voted” for the One(s) THEY SElected. Just saying…

        Like

    • nowve666 12:35 on October 12, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      They can’t indoctrinate us unless we let them. Psychopaths are very hard to brainwash or indoctrinate so we are likely to vote more rationally than most. I know they have the whole system rigged but our votes still count as long as we can stop them from gerrymandering too much. With Citizens United, deep pockets have an enormous advantage of financing campaigns. Still, those of us who are still capable of rational thought are not going to zombie-like vote for whoever has the greatest number of commercials. Too much television and a tendency to allow emotions to rule is one of the biggest problems. Of course, the Democratic Party is also partially to blame. The stupid, cynical politicians are their own (and our) worst enemies. They don’t have the guts to trust their own ideology and they keep coming on like Republican-lite. And voters are too hung up on personalities. How else could intellectually bankrupt slogans like “crooked Hillary” have so much power? If Bernie Sanders had been the candidate of the Democratic Party, he would be president today. But Democrats are too busy wresting defeat from the jaws of victory. Sigh! Just don’t trust psychopaths for that.

      Like

      • Amaterasu Solar 19:22 on October 12, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        nowve, first, have You noticed that THEY give Us the candidates We “choose” from? Ever wonder why every “election,” so Many are trying to decide between the lesser of two evils? WE have no say.

        Like

    • James 18:58 on October 12, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Liked own comment to try and keep it here. My rationale is that when I try to approve others’ comments, and it doesn’t let me, liking and replying seems to override the system and approve the comment by default.

      Liked by 1 person

      • James 18:59 on October 12, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        Shite, it didn’t work.

        Pasted from before:

        I am hopeless at computers, but does anyone know why my comments keep disappearing?

        This is my fourth attempt:

        Did I do this right, Tina? I agree with what you said; it will be interesting to see how people on Facebook react. My theory is that the negative attention from a known liar and deviant individual (myself) would work as a kind of reverse psychology, and spur more people to click the link, and donate money.

        Like

  • James 19:42 on September 9, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , chips and gravy, Ecky thump, motto, , , , , Put t'wood in t'oil!, , , , We're right you're wrong - Yorkshire Yorkshire Yorkshire, Yorkshire   

    A motto for psychopaths? 

    Ey up, me duck. ‘Ow do?

    Image result for whitby dracula

    I spend part of my time living in Yorkshire, the largest county in England. Which is to say, it’s not very large, because England isn’t very large; but it’s still bigger than all the other counties. Yorkshire is the stereotypical ‘North’, home of grim industrial towns, bleak and desolate moors, green sheep-peppered dales, and flat cap-wearing locals with a love of whippets and clog dancing. Yorkshire has given the world stainless steel, Wensleydale cheese, annoying yappy dogs, club football (proper football, not that hand-egg nancy sport played by the Yanks), rugby league, ferret legging (look it up), Yorkshire pudding, white roses, Robin Hood, all three Brontë sisters and Sean Bean. That accent all the miserable northern bastards in Game of Thrones use? That there’s a Yorkshire accent. The eerie town Count Dracula first makes landfall in Britain at? Whitby, in fucking Yorkshire. Naturally.

    Basically, the world owes an enormous debt to Yorkshiremen, and don’t they know it! The tongue in cheek motto for all Yorkshire folk between the Pennines and the sea, from Sheffield all the way up to Staithes is:

    Image result for wallace and gromit wensleydale

    ‘Ear all, see all, say nowt;
    Eyt all, sup all, pay nowt;
    And if ivver tha does owt fer nowt –
    Allus do it fer thissen.

    For those of you who don’t speak ‘God’s Own Tongue’, the English translation:

    Hear everything, see everything, say nothing;
    Eat everything, drink everything, pay nothing;
    And if you ever do anything – always do it for yourself.

    Now, I don’t know about you, but that to me sounds like a pretty great philosophy to live by. It boils down to take as much as you can without giving in return. Travel the world, and sample as many of its experiences as possible, but don’t sweat the small stuff and get bogged down in pleasing other people. Live for yourself, because nobody else matters. And on the odd occasions when prudence demands you give a little back – to save face, to flatter, to make sure everybody else keeps dancing your tune, then do so without taking your eyes off the ball. Do it for yourself.

    So the humble Yorkshire tyke is really just advocating a form of philosophical psychopathy.

    Flippin’ ‘Eck!

     

     
    • nowve666 20:39 on September 9, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Dracula and the three Brontë sisters? Sounds like a cool place.

      Liked by 1 person

    • nowve666 22:10 on September 9, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Psychopathy means never having to say you’re sorry. Like love.

      Like

      • James 06:15 on September 10, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        I disagree. Sometimes we all have to say sorry, whether lovers, psychopaths or anybody else. But it’s just a word; it doesn’t cost anything and can have big pay-offs.

        Like

    • Amaterasu Solar 12:20 on September 10, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Ah, the philosophy of psychopaths. Well, I do everything for Self-satisfaction. That caring for Others is what gives Me Self-satisfaction is what divides Me (and most of Humanity) from the psychopaths. I care very deeply for Others, but try very hard not to be taken advantage of by psychopaths because of that. Mostly I succeed. [smile]

      Like

      • James 13:22 on September 10, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        Indeed, you (and the Humanity you presume to speak for) are living proof that there is no such thing as altruism. If helping others gave you no satisfaction, you would not do it.

        Liked by 1 person

        • Amaterasu Solar 13:50 on September 10, 2017 Permalink | Reply

          LOL! I only “presume” based on the fact that primary psychopathy is about 1% of Humans, and secondary psychopathy 5-9%. The rest of Us are not psychopaths and DO gain satisfaction from caring for Others. But You are indeed correct. I too have argued that “altruism” does not exist. Everything We choose to do is Self-motivated, and if most of Us could not gain that Self-satisfaction from caring, society would not function. [smile]

          Like

    • Mark Hodgson 03:27 on October 8, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Nice post…

      Like

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