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  • James 08:42 on May 5, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: antisocial, ASPD, , , , , DSM, , , , ICD, intelligence, just testing to see if you're reading these, myths and legends, personality disorders, prison, , , , reality check, , workplace   

    Mythbusting psychopathy (part 1) 

    There are far too many common myths about psychopaths out there that I am sick of reading about. Here is a list of the most irritating, along with a hearty dose of reality. Note the links, which are my citations.

    Which one surprises you the most? Let me know in the comments. 

     

    MYTH: Psychopaths don’t know they’re psychopaths.

    Oh really? While some psychopaths (particularly very young or uneducated ones) may not know the specific term “psychopath”, or that it applies to them, all psychopaths of at least young adulthood are fully cognisant of their difference from others. What’s more, in this age of near-universal internet access, I’d be very surprised to come across an adult psychopath without some understanding of their psychopathy, though I expect back in the pre-web days many lived their whole lives without ever finding out why they were different. Most couldn’t be happier to be what they are; that is to say, most are fucking arrogant pricks.

     

    MYTH: Psychopaths are ‘worse’ than sociopaths; psychopaths are born, sociopaths are made; psychopaths and sociopaths are different things.

    Actually, neither psychopath nor sociopath are medical terms. The official term covering both in the latest versions of the Diagnostic Statistical Manual (DSM – 5) and the International Classification of Diseases (ICD – 10) is antisocial personality disorder (ASPD).

    The terms “psychopath” and “sociopath” have been used for the various theoretical explanations for the condition, with specialists using “psychopath” preferring a biological or neurological explanation (e.g. a psychopathic gene, brain damage) and researchers using “sociopath” more interested in social causes (e.g. childhood abuse, poor parenting). Modern consensus among psychologists and neuroscientists points toward a combination of the two, and most researchers in the field prefer the use of “psychopath” over the now rather dated and pop-sciencey “sociopath”. Osteopaths and homeopaths are something else entirely…

    Yes, Bob Hare’s famous PCL-R Checklist is a slightly different beast, but since it is only administered to dickheads locked up in prison, I would argue it focuses too strongly on criminality (and how an individual should be treated by the justice system) for it to be considered a legitimate diagnosis. I will concede that Hare himself does not like psychopathy being lumped in with ASPD. However, the British National Health Service and the American MedlinePlus medical encyclopedia both consider psychopathy to be a severe form of ASPD. Wait, this is stupid.

    So in actual fact, it seems nobody can agree on what, if anything, is the difference between these three terms: psychopathy, sociopathy and ASPD. Abandon hope and run to the hills.

     

    MYTH: Psychopaths have no empathy.

    Psychopaths have little or no warm empathy; that is to say they do not typically share the emotions of others or care about how other people feel. They are unsympathetic and lacking in compassion toward others. Psychopaths are quite capable of cold empathy, however; that is to say understanding how other people think and feel. They deliberately mimic facial expressions and behaviour that they see in others. Autistic people (in the broadest sense of what is a very broad spectrum) are kind of the opposite of this: they care about others’ feelings and share emotions, but are usually very bad at working out what other people are thinking or reading facial expressions.

    Recent research has also suggested psychopaths are capable of warm empathy when they actively try to empathise with other people, and that they can activate it like a switch when asked to do so.

     

    MYTH: All evil in the world is psychopaths’ fault.

    This barely warrants an answer. Every human being is capable of evil, but non-psychopaths mostly use their morality, their political ideals or shudder their religion as justification for their wrongdoing. The infamous Milgram experiments on obedience demonstrated that average Joe is more than happy to electrocute someone to death when told to do so by an authority figure.

    Yes, psychopaths do bad things if they feel like it. I’d say that’s a hell of a lot more honest than, for instance those who claim to believe in equality but still want a strong border to keep out the people with dark skin, or those oh-so-pious liberal saints who ignore Hobo Bill every day to get their morning Starbucks, or the followers of the Religion of Peace™ who blow themselves to kingdom come for a sniff of virgin. Ask most psychopaths, they will say the same. We are sick of taking the blame for everything, and laugh at the hypocrisy of those who assign said blame.

     

    Pic #2 - This is what happens when a psychopath gets access to coloring pages

    MYTH: Psychopaths actively wish harm on others. They hate everyone else. 

    You’re thinking of sadists and misanthropes. There is certainly a lot of overlap between sadism and psychopathy, but the true psychopathic attitude toward others is indifference. Everything I do is to benefit me; you do not come into the equation. If in the process of taking care of number 1, I make you laugh, cry, smile or squeal, well that was just incidental. You’re welcome / sorry / I don’t care.

     

     

    MYTH: Psychopaths are all active criminals or behind bars.

    It is true that as much as 25% of the American prison population may be psychopathic, and that some of the worst serial killers and mass murderers in history were psychopaths. What’s more, probably every psychopath out there has committed a crime at one point or other in their life (who hasn’t?) and clever ones are likely to get away with them for longer. Taking my whole life into account, I am guilty of physical assault, fraud, theft and petty vandalism (oh and probably “psychological abuse”, which my country in its infinite wisdom has recently made a crime. Talk about discriminating against my lifestyle!) These are not regular occurrences in my life though, and I am not known to the police.

    It is simply not the case that every psychopath is a hardened career criminal. Many, indeed probably most, psychopaths have never killed or seriously hurt another person. These ‘socialised’ psychopaths live normal lives, going to work, walking the dog, paying taxes, washing up, beating up prostitutes in back alleys… Psychopaths are found in all walks of life, more often than not with good, stable jobs and at a high or upwardly-mobile point on the social hierarchy. Which means that yes, some are drug lords, mafia bosses and terrorist leaders. But most are… well, see below.

     

    Image result for i'll kill you i'll kill all of you especially those of you in the jury

    MYTH: Psychopaths are a horrible scourge and a drain on our society.

    Just look at the list of the top 10 jobs with the most psychopaths:

    1. Corporate executive
    2. Lawyer
    3. Broadcast media
    4. Salesperson
    5. Surgeon
    6. Print or web journalist
    7. Police officer
    8. Member of the clergy
    9. Chef
    10. Civil servant

    So your society would likely collapse without psychopaths running your shit for you.

     

    MYTH: Psychopaths are more intelligent than non-psychopaths

    Psychopathy does not affect intelligence. There are some psychopathic geniuses, and many who are borderline retarded. Most lie somewhere in between, just like the general population. I would describe myself as well above average intelligence, but not (yet!) at the level of a genius. Bearing in mind my own “inflated self-worth” and “arrogance”, you may wish to adjust that estimate slightly lower.

    Keep your eyes peeled for part 2 next week. Stay in touch.

     
    • nowve666 10:10 on May 5, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      I’ve got a new one, kinda related to “All the Evil in the World” being our fault. Psychopaths are regularly blamed for the economic meltdown. I think the right-wing had something to do with it. And, as you pointed out, NTs are capable of evil. I’m frankly shocked that emotional “abuse” can be prosecuted as a crime. These things are so subjective. How does a prosecutor prove someone isolated his/her partner? Maybe they just found the other person’s friends more interesting or something. I guess you have “criminal versatility” but no drugs? Never? Do you think, as does PsychoMom, a brain scan can reveal a psychopath?

      Like

      • James 14:08 on May 5, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        I don’t know how psychological abuse can be proven. There’s no physical evidence like with wife beating or sexual assault, but maybe the police have phone-tapping powers or something typically underhand to gather evidence.

        Brain scans can definitely reveal psychopaths; have you heard of James Fallon?

        If you’re asking if I’ve taken drugs, I have, but I don’t really like things which take me out of myself. LSD doesn’t appeal, nor do any hallucinogenics really. I rarely drink enough to get drunk, but I like many kinds of alcoholic drink. I have found both weed and tobacco to be good about half the time, but otherwise disappointing, so both seem like a waste of money. Coke is the best I’ve tried, but I can’t afford to make a habit of it, and it is quite moreish.

        Like

  • GeneticPsychosMom (Tina) 09:38 on April 10, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: antisocial, , , , , , , , , , , , Republicans, ,   

    Dear Kentucky, Mitch McConnell Might Be a Psychopath 

    Mitch McConnell Contradiction in facial expression - a smile with a frown - smirk and dead eyes

    Contradiction in facial expression – a smile with a frown – smirk and dead eyes

    McConnell: ‘Winners make policy, losers go home” and more quotes on “Stuff Psychopaths Say.”

    “No majority leader wants written on his tombstone that he presided over the end of the Senate,” the minority leader said.

    He continued: “Breaking the rules to change the rules is un-American. I just hope the majority leader thinks about his legacy, the future of his party, and, most importantly, the future of our country before he acts.”

    Are these the words of Minority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-N.Y.) as the Republican majority changed Senate rules this week to do away with filibusters of Supreme Court nominations?

    Actually, they were uttered in 2013, by then-Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.), when Democrats pushed through a similar filibuster change for lesser nominations.

    That McConnell did a 180 on the topic — going from the institutional defender of the filibuster to the man who destroyed it — is unsurprising. He has frequently shifted his views to suit the needs of the moment. But in this case McConnell was correct in 2013, and what he just did this week was even more ruinous than what he accused the Democrats of doing then.

    By rights, McConnell’s tombstone should say that he presided over the end of the Senate. And I’d add a second line: “He broke America.” No man has done more in recent years to undermine the functioning of U.S. government. His has been the epitome of unprincipled leadership, the triumph of tactics in service of short-term power.

    After McConnell justified his filibuster-ending “nuclear option” by saying it would be beneficial for the Senate, Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.) said this: “Whoever says that is a stupid idiot.”

    McConnell is no idiot. He is a clever man who does what works for him in the moment, consequences be damned.

    Back in 1994, McConnell lamented to the conservative Heritage Foundation that Republicans hadn’t used the filibuster enough: “I am a proud guardian of gridlock. I think gridlock is making a big comeback in the country.”

    For the next quarter-century, he made sure of it. Back then he was fighting all attempts at campaign-finance reform and spending limits, championing disclosure of contributions as the antidote. But when the Supreme Court allowed unlimited “dark money” in campaigns without disclosure, McConnell reversed course and has fought all attempts to enact disclosure.

    McConnell famously declared in 2010: “The single most important thing we want to achieve is for President Obama to be a one-term president.”

    ProPublica’s Alec MacGillis, author of a McConnell biography, “The Cynic,” reports former Republican senator Robert Bennett’s account of what McConnell told fellow Republicans after Obama’s election: “Mitch said, ‘We have a new president with an approval rating in the 70 percent area. We do not take him on frontally. We find issues where we can win, and we begin to take him down, one issue at a time. We create an inventory of losses, so it’s Obama lost on this, Obama lost on that.’ ”

    And that’s what he did. By 2013, for example, 79 of Obama’s nominees had been blocked by filibusters, compared with 68 in the entire previous history of the Republic.

    After Justice Antonin Scalia’s death was confirmed last year, it took McConnell less than an hour to say that the vacancy should be filled by the next president. He called keeping Obama’s nominee off the court “one of my proudest moments.”

    While other Republicans have at times been willing to criticize President Trump’s outrages, McConnell has been conspicuously quiescent. Although his predecessors at least attempted collegiality, McConnell practices no such niceties (recall his “nevertheless, she persisted” silencing of Massachusetts Democratic Sen. Elizabeth Warren). But most characteristic of McConnell is his tendency to shift his views to suit current exigencies (on the minimum wage, withdrawal from Iraq, earmarks, abortion, labor and civil rights) and his adroitness at gumming up the works: forcing clerks to spend hours reading a bill aloud on the floor; opposing immigration legislation he’d encouraged; asking for a vote on a debt-ceiling proposal and then trying to filibuster it; urging the Obama administration to support a bipartisan debt commission and then voting against it.

    Now comes the filibuster’s demise. In the current cycle of partisan escalation, it’s only a matter of time before the filibuster is abolished for all legislation, killing the tradition of unlimited debate in the Senate dating back to 1789. The Founders did this so minority rights would be respected and consensus could be formed — and McConnell is undoing it.

    Two years ago, when a Democrat was in the White House, McConnell said he would only abolish filibusters of Supreme Court justices if there were 67 votes for such a change. This week, he employed a maneuver to do it with 51 votes. It suited his momentary needs, but the damage will remain long after McConnell’s tombstone is engraved.

    Excerpt from “Mitch McConnell, the man who broke America“, by Dana Milbank, April 7, 2017

    Image courtesy The Conversation US

     

    Habits of Highly Psychopathic People Pic

     

    Psychopath TEST Politicians

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    • nowve666 09:59 on April 10, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Much as I hate the GOP, I have a grudging respect for them because of their ruthless pursuit of having their way. At the same time, I have a reluctant contempt for weak-kneed Democrats who let them get away with it. Perfect case in point, when the Repugs refused to do their jobs in the process of confirming (or denying) Obama’s Supreme Court appointment. They just don’t give a damn. They’re like Honey Badgers. Everyone shakes his head and says how wrong it was and the GOP just goes ahead and does it anyway. Result? They now have that seat. Too bad the GOP agenda is everything I’m against. I would love to see that ruthlessness used in favor of an agenda I would like.

      As for the nuclear option, I wanted Obama to use it to pass the health care bill. I’m glad someone finally got rid of the filibuster although I don’t like what they did it for. Maybe now, when our idiot country finally wakes up and kicks these fascists out of office and we have a Democratic Congress, they will be able to actually pass legislation.

      Don’t Psychopath test politicians. We need a good progressive psychopath in government to make his ideas actually work.

      Like

    • Amaterasu Solar 15:54 on April 12, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      All high-up politicians are psychopaths. Maybe a few are puppets of psychopaths. Maybe. The psychopaths in control do NOT let Any get high up in politics unless They are on board with the psychopaths’ agenda.

      Like

  • GeneticPsychosMom (Tina) 09:15 on March 19, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , antisocial, , , , , , , , , , , , , ,   

    The Cruel Reign of Donald the Wicked 

    King Donald the Wicked

    The theme that unites all of Trump’s initiatives so far is their unnecessary cruelty.

    1. His new budget comes down especially hard on the poor – imposing unprecedented cuts in low-income housing, job training, food assistance, legal services, help to distressed rural communities, nutrition for new mothers and their infants, funds to keep poor families warm, even “meals on wheels.”

    These cuts come at a time when more American families are in poverty than ever before, including 1 in 5 children.

    Why is Trump doing this? To pay for the biggest hike in military spending since the 1980s. Yet the U.S. already spends more on its military than the next 7 biggest military budgets put together.

    1. His plan to repeal and “replace” the Affordable Care Act will cause 14 million Americans to lose their health insurance next year, and 24 million by 2026.

    Why is Trump doing this? To bestow $600 billion in tax breaks over the decade to wealthy Americans. This windfall comes at a time when the rich have accumulated more wealth than at any time in the nation’s history.

    The plan reduces the federal budget deficit by only $337 billion over the next ten years – a small fraction of the national debt, in exchange for an enormous amount of human hardship.

    1. His ban on Syrian refugees and reduction by half in the total number of refugees admitted to the United States comes just when the world is experiencing the worst refugee crisis since World War II.

    Why is Trump doing this? The ban does little or nothing to protect Americans from terrorism. No terrorist act in the United States has been perpetrated by a Syrian or by anyone from the six nations whose citizens are now banned from traveling to the United States. You have higher odds of being struck by lightning than dying from an immigrant terrorist attack.

    1. His dragnet roundup of undocumented immigrants is helter-skelter – including people who have been productive members of our society for decades, and young people who have been here since they were toddlers.

    Why is Trump doing this? He has no compelling justification. Unemployment is down, crime is down, and we have fewer undocumented workers in the U.S. today than we did five years ago.

    Trump is embarking on an orgy of cruelty for absolutely no reason. This is morally repugnant. It violates every ideal this nation has ever cherished. We have a moral responsibility to stop it.

    Excerpt from: Robert Reich: 4 Reasons the Trump Administration Is Unspeakably Cruel, March 17, 2017

    Robert B. Reich has served in three national administrations, most recently as Secretary of Labor under President Bill Clinton. His latest book is “Saving Capitalism: For the Many, Not the Few.” His website is http://www.robertreich.org.

    Photo courtesy https://twitter.com/kingdonaldtrum1

     

    Psychopath TEST Politicians

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    • Amaterasu Solar 11:33 on March 20, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      I wish I could post a graphic here… I have one I have been tweeting out that says:

      Cut the military
      Feed the poor
      I do not
      Consent to war!

      Yes, Grump is another psychopath puppet for the psychopaths in control, and again, I suggest We withdraw Our consent from systems that promote psychopaths. My latest article:

      I AM anti-New World Order – A Better Way
      http://tapyoureit.boards.net/thread/99/anti-new-world-order

      Like

      • James 15:21 on March 20, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        You’re still an author here, so you should be able to put any image you like in a new post (as long as it’s of a certain common type supported by WordPress – .jpg, .png, .gif etc). I certainly can.

        Like

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