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  • James 19:42 on September 9, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , chips and gravy, Ecky thump, motto, Narcissistic Personality Disorder, , , , Put t'wood in t'oil!, , , , We're right you're wrong - Yorkshire Yorkshire Yorkshire, Yorkshire   

    A motto for psychopaths? 

    Ey up, me duck. ‘Ow do?

    Image result for whitby dracula

    I spend part of my time living in Yorkshire, the largest county in England. Which is to say, it’s not very large, because England isn’t very large; but it’s still bigger than all the other counties. Yorkshire is the stereotypical ‘North’, home of grim industrial towns, bleak and desolate moors, green sheep-peppered dales, and flat cap-wearing locals with a love of whippets and clog dancing. Yorkshire has given the world stainless steel, Wensleydale cheese, annoying yappy dogs, club football (proper football, not that hand-egg nancy sport played by the Yanks), rugby league, ferret legging (look it up), Yorkshire pudding, white roses, Robin Hood, all three Brontë sisters and Sean Bean. That accent all the miserable northern bastards in Game of Thrones use? That there’s a Yorkshire accent. The eerie town Count Dracula first makes landfall in Britain at? Whitby, in fucking Yorkshire. Naturally.

    Basically, the world owes an enormous debt to Yorkshiremen, and don’t they know it! The tongue in cheek motto for all Yorkshire folk between the Pennines and the sea, from Sheffield all the way up to Staithes is:

    Image result for wallace and gromit wensleydale

    ‘Ear all, see all, say nowt;
    Eyt all, sup all, pay nowt;
    And if ivver tha does owt fer nowt –
    Allus do it fer thissen.

    For those of you who don’t speak ‘God’s Own Tongue’, the English translation:

    Hear everything, see everything, say nothing;
    Eat everything, drink everything, pay nothing;
    And if you ever do anything – always do it for yourself.

    Now, I don’t know about you, but that to me sounds like a pretty great philosophy to live by. It boils down to take as much as you can without giving in return. Travel the world, and sample as many of its experiences as possible, but don’t sweat the small stuff and get bogged down in pleasing other people. Live for yourself, because nobody else matters. And on the odd occasions when prudence demands you give a little back – to save face, to flatter, to make sure everybody else keeps dancing your tune, then do so without taking your eyes off the ball. Do it for yourself.

    So the humble Yorkshire tyke is really just advocating a form of philosophical psychopathy.

    Flippin’ ‘Eck!

     

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    • nowve666 20:39 on September 9, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Dracula and the three Brontë sisters? Sounds like a cool place.

      Liked by 1 person

    • nowve666 22:10 on September 9, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Psychopathy means never having to say you’re sorry. Like love.

      Like

      • James 06:15 on September 10, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        I disagree. Sometimes we all have to say sorry, whether lovers, psychopaths or anybody else. But it’s just a word; it doesn’t cost anything and can have big pay-offs.

        Like

    • Amaterasu Solar 12:20 on September 10, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Ah, the philosophy of psychopaths. Well, I do everything for Self-satisfaction. That caring for Others is what gives Me Self-satisfaction is what divides Me (and most of Humanity) from the psychopaths. I care very deeply for Others, but try very hard not to be taken advantage of by psychopaths because of that. Mostly I succeed. [smile]

      Like

      • James 13:22 on September 10, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        Indeed, you (and the Humanity you presume to speak for) are living proof that there is no such thing as altruism. If helping others gave you no satisfaction, you would not do it.

        Liked by 1 person

        • Amaterasu Solar 13:50 on September 10, 2017 Permalink | Reply

          LOL! I only “presume” based on the fact that primary psychopathy is about 1% of Humans, and secondary psychopathy 5-9%. The rest of Us are not psychopaths and DO gain satisfaction from caring for Others. But You are indeed correct. I too have argued that “altruism” does not exist. Everything We choose to do is Self-motivated, and if most of Us could not gain that Self-satisfaction from caring, society would not function. [smile]

          Like

  • GeneticPsychosMom (Tina) 09:15 on March 19, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , Narcissistic Personality Disorder, ,   

    The Cruel Reign of Donald the Wicked 

    King Donald the Wicked

    The theme that unites all of Trump’s initiatives so far is their unnecessary cruelty.

    1. His new budget comes down especially hard on the poor – imposing unprecedented cuts in low-income housing, job training, food assistance, legal services, help to distressed rural communities, nutrition for new mothers and their infants, funds to keep poor families warm, even “meals on wheels.”

    These cuts come at a time when more American families are in poverty than ever before, including 1 in 5 children.

    Why is Trump doing this? To pay for the biggest hike in military spending since the 1980s. Yet the U.S. already spends more on its military than the next 7 biggest military budgets put together.

    1. His plan to repeal and “replace” the Affordable Care Act will cause 14 million Americans to lose their health insurance next year, and 24 million by 2026.

    Why is Trump doing this? To bestow $600 billion in tax breaks over the decade to wealthy Americans. This windfall comes at a time when the rich have accumulated more wealth than at any time in the nation’s history.

    The plan reduces the federal budget deficit by only $337 billion over the next ten years – a small fraction of the national debt, in exchange for an enormous amount of human hardship.

    1. His ban on Syrian refugees and reduction by half in the total number of refugees admitted to the United States comes just when the world is experiencing the worst refugee crisis since World War II.

    Why is Trump doing this? The ban does little or nothing to protect Americans from terrorism. No terrorist act in the United States has been perpetrated by a Syrian or by anyone from the six nations whose citizens are now banned from traveling to the United States. You have higher odds of being struck by lightning than dying from an immigrant terrorist attack.

    1. His dragnet roundup of undocumented immigrants is helter-skelter – including people who have been productive members of our society for decades, and young people who have been here since they were toddlers.

    Why is Trump doing this? He has no compelling justification. Unemployment is down, crime is down, and we have fewer undocumented workers in the U.S. today than we did five years ago.

    Trump is embarking on an orgy of cruelty for absolutely no reason. This is morally repugnant. It violates every ideal this nation has ever cherished. We have a moral responsibility to stop it.

    Excerpt from: Robert Reich: 4 Reasons the Trump Administration Is Unspeakably Cruel, March 17, 2017

    Robert B. Reich has served in three national administrations, most recently as Secretary of Labor under President Bill Clinton. His latest book is “Saving Capitalism: For the Many, Not the Few.” His website is http://www.robertreich.org.

    Photo courtesy https://twitter.com/kingdonaldtrum1

     

    Psychopath TEST Politicians

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    • Amaterasu Solar 11:33 on March 20, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      I wish I could post a graphic here… I have one I have been tweeting out that says:

      Cut the military
      Feed the poor
      I do not
      Consent to war!

      Yes, Grump is another psychopath puppet for the psychopaths in control, and again, I suggest We withdraw Our consent from systems that promote psychopaths. My latest article:

      I AM anti-New World Order – A Better Way
      http://tapyoureit.boards.net/thread/99/anti-new-world-order

      Like

      • James 15:21 on March 20, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        You’re still an author here, so you should be able to put any image you like in a new post (as long as it’s of a certain common type supported by WordPress – .jpg, .png, .gif etc). I certainly can.

        Like

  • GeneticPsychosMom (Tina) 10:55 on September 23, 2015 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , Narcissistic Personality Disorder, , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,   

    The Sneaky Bastard’s (Sociopath) Playbook 

    The Sociopath's PlaybookExcerpt from BOOK REVIEW: The 48 Laws of Power By Ox Drover

    Many times on Lovefraud, bloggers have joked with me that a particular phrase or behavior “came out of the ‘Psychopath’s play book,’“ the kind of book in which a football team would write all their usual plays.

    I recently bought a book entitled, The 48 Laws of Power, by Robert Greene, because it sounded like an interesting book. But the more I got into it, I realized that the heretofore-thought-mythical “Psychopathic Play book” does exist, and this is it!

    Robert Greene, by the way, also wrote The Art of Seduction.

    Here’s what the jacket blurb on the back of The 48 Laws of Power says about its content:

    The best-selling book for those who want POWER, watch POWER, or want to arm themselves against POWER. Amoral, cunning, ruthless and instructive, this piercing work distills three thousand years of the history of power into forty-eight well explicated laws. As attention-grabbing in its design as in its content, this bold volume outlines the laws of power in their unvarnished essence, synthesizing the philosophies of Machiavelli, Sun Tzu, Carol Von Clausewitz and other great thinkers. Some laws require prudence, some stealth, some total absence of mercy, but like it or not, all have applications in real-life situations. Illustrated through the tactics of Queen Elizabeth I, Henry Kissinger, P. T. Barnum, and other famous figures who have wielded, or been victimized by power, these laws will fascinate any reader interested in gaining, observing, or defending against ultimate control.

    The 48 laws are listed in the contentsWolf in Sheep's Clothing

    Law 1: Never outshine the master

    Law 2: Never put too much trust in friends, learn how to use enemies

    Law 3: Conceal your intentions

    Law 4: Always say less than necessary

    Law 5: So much depends on reputation—guard it with your life

    Law 6: Court attention at all cost

    Law 7: Get others to do the work for you, but always take the credit

    Law 8: Make other people come to you—use bait if necessary

    Law 9: Win through your actions, never through argument

    Law 10: Infection: avoid the unhappy and unlucky

    Law 11: Learn to keep people dependent on you

    LiesLaw 12: Use selective honesty and generosity to disarm your victim

    Law 13: When asking for help, appeal to people’s self-interest, never to their mercy or gratitude

    Law 14: Pose as a friend, work as a spy

    Law 15: Crush your enemy totally

    Law 16: Use absence to increase respect and honor

    Law 17: Cultivate an air of unpredictability

    Law 18: Do not built fortresses to protect yourself, isolation is dangerous

    Law 19: Know who you’re dealing with—do not offend the wrong person

    Law 20: Do not commit to anyone

    Law 21: Play a sucker to catch a sucker—seem dumber than your mark

    Law 22: Use the surrender tactic: Transform weakness into power

    Law 23: Concentrate your forces

    Law 24: Play the perfect courtier

    Get a makeoverLaw 25: Re-create yourself

    Law 26: Keep your hands clean

    Law 27: Play on people’s ‘need to believe’ to create a cult-like following

    Law 28: Enter action with boldness

    Law 29: Play all the way to the end

    Law 30: Make your accomplishments seem effortless

    Law 31: Control the options: Get others to play with the cards you deal

    Law 32: Play to people’s fantasies

    Law 33: Discover each man’s thumb screw

    Law 34:Be royal in your own fashion: Act like a king to be treated like a king

    Law 35: Master the art of timing

    Law 36: Disdain things you cannot have: Ignoring them is the best revenge

    Amazing spectacleLaw 37: Create compelling spectacles

    Law 38: Think as you like but behave like others

    Law 39: Stir up waters to catch fish

    Law 40: Despise the free lunch

    Law 41: Avoid stepping into a great man’s shoes

    Law 42 Strike the shepherd and the sheep will scatter

    Law 43: Work on the hearts and minds of others

    Law 44: Disarm and infuriate with the mirror effect

    Law 45: Preach the need for change, but never reform too much at once

    Law 46: Never appear too perfect

    Law 47: Do not go past the mark you aimed for; in victory, learn when to stop

    Law 48: Assume formlessness

    Perfect advice for psychopaths

    The preface of the book gets right down to business:

    No one wants less power, everyone wants more … in the world today, however, it is dangerous to seem too power hungry, to be overt with your power moves. We have to seem fair and decent. So we need to be subtle—congenial yet cunning, democratic, yet devious.

    This game of constant duplicity most resembles the power dynamic that existed in the scheming world of the old aristocratic court(s).

    The author, Greene, then goes on to perfectly describe the psychopath’s ways, without naming him such “…those who make a show or display of innocence are the least innocent of all.” What else but a psychopath could “recognize…by the way they flaunt their moral qualities, their piety, their exquisite sense of justice … but (they) are merely throwing dust in our eyes distracting us from their power plays with their air of moral superiority….you will see they are often the ones most skillful at indirect manipulation, …and they greatly resent any publicizing of the tactics they use.”

    Emotions

    In directing his readers how to master the most important skills in acquiring power, Greene tells them that the most important foundation is to “master your emotions.” He states that an emotional response is the single greatest barrier to gaining power. In this particular thing, I totally agree with him, because if we are emotional about a situation, we lose sight of the ultimate goal, and as he says, “cannot prepare for and respond to it with any degree of control.”

    Greene goes on to say that anger is the most destructive of emotional responses, and “clouds your vision the most.” Again, I totally agree with Greene in this statement, but then he goes on to add what I would think is directed more toward the vengeful psychopath than to less pathological people, “If you are trying to destroy an enemy who has hurt you, far better to keep him off-guard by feigning friendliness than showing your anger.”

    The mask

    Psychopaths have been described by many writers as “wearing a mask” or even “the mask of sanity.” Greene seems to be very aware of this “masking” when he advises his readers that, “You cannot succeed at deception unless you take a somewhat distanced approach to yourself—unless you can be many different people, wearing the mask that the day and moment require.”

    Psychopaths tend to project blame for their behavior on to other people, to refuse to assume responsibility for any of the things they have done. They lie “when the truth would fit better.” Greene says, “Power requires the ability to play with appearances. To this end you must learn to wear many masks and keep a bag full of deceptive tricks.” He goes on to say, “Playing with appearances and mastering arts of deception are among the aesthetic pleasures of life. They are also the key components in the acquisition of power.”

    Green does not seem to view deception or the acquisition of power as anything immoral, and he actually says, “Power is essentially amoral…power is a game…and in games you do not judge your opponents by their intentions but by the effect of their actions.” He goes on to advise the reader to not be caught by assuming that someone has good intentions, or that their good intentions matter. Greene advises his readers that some sets of moral judgments are “really an excuse for the accumulation of power.” I can definitely agree with that last statement. Frequently, religion and moral judgments are used as justification for a power stance that has no other legitimacy, and does great harm to the victims.

    Chapter One

    For each of the 48 laws of power, Green has a short chapter that consists of the name of the law, the first being, “Never Outshine the Master.”  Then he has a section called “Judgment,” in which he explains more fully the named law of power. The first law is reasonably self-explanatory and makes sense, really, because if you show your boss you are superior to him/her, then he/she will resent you.

    After giving several good examples of using this law, or failing to use this law, Greene finishes up Chapter One by saying, “You cannot worry about upsetting every person you come across, but you must be selectively cruel. If your superior is a falling star, there is nothing to fear in outshining him. Do not be merciful—your master had no such scruples in his own cold-blooded climb to the top. Gauge his strength. If he is weak, discreetly hasten his downfall: Outdo, outcharm, outsmart him at key moments.”

    While this book seems aimed at the “amoral-wannabe-politician on the way up,” rather than the psychopathic “wannabe-gang-banger thug” on the corner who is illiterate, I think that those of us who have had or even will have associations with psychopaths, or “Snakes in Suits” (to highjack the name of the book as a noun), should read this to learn how to discern when we are being played by the power-seeker. If we can recognize the masks for their deceptive cover, we can avoid the consequences of being played, or possibly turn the play back on to the player.

    Disturbing, but necessary, reading

    Frankly, this book made me uncomfortable while I was reading it, I think possibly by showing me “red flags” of power plays that I had experienced in the past, but had not quite recognized at the time I was being played. However, I do think the knowledge I gained by reading this book is well worth the slight discomfort. It isn’t a book that you can “zip through” quickly, but one that must, like the textbook that it is, read and ponder, and even re-read, and ponder again.

    The most personally disturbing part of the book was one in which he was discussing the siege of Troy, and he said, “Image: The Trojan Horse. Your guile is hidden inside a magnificent gift that proves irresistible to your opponent. The walls open. Once inside, wreak havoc.”

    We must learn to protect ourselves from those power-players who have no conscience, the power players who will use calculated acts of kindness or proffered gifts to earn our trust. Selective kindness can be the biggest part of the arsenal of deception. “Aimed for the heart, it corrodes the will to fight back.”

    The 48 Laws of Power is available on Amazon.com.

    Source:  BOOK REVIEW: The 48 Laws of Power, by Ox Drover, December 2010

    Photos courtesy Ged Carroll, Kris Krug, Mary Doodles

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    Psychopath Test Politicians

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